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The Confession: A Novel Mass Market Paperback – Jul 19 2011


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Dell; Reprint edition (July 19 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440245117
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440245117
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 3 x 19 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #36,239 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

“[A] grab-a-reader-by-the-shoulders suspense story.”—The Washington Post

“[John Grisham] is a master at pacing. . . . The book starts fast and finishes faster.”—Los Angeles Times

“Packed with tension, legal roadblocks and shocking revelations.”—USA Today

About the Author

John Grisham is the author of twenty-two novels, one work of nonfiction, a collection of stories, and a novel for young readers.  He is on the Board of Directors of the Innocence Project in New York and is the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Mississippi Innocence Project at the University of Mississippi School of Law. He lives in Virginia and Mississippi.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Nov. 11 2010
Format: Hardcover
"And though they found no cause for death in Him, they asked Pilate that He should be put to death." -- Acts 13:28 (NKJV)

If you ask most people whether they favor the death penalty, you'll get an opinion that's largely unrelated to the practical issues involved. The crusading death-penalty skeptic in John Grisham comes out in this novel, much as the social reformer in Charles Dickens can be found in David Copperfield and Oliver Twist.

If you are familiar with death penalty legal practice, you'll be impressed with the accuracy of the fictional portrayal here. Grisham knows what he's writing about.

If you read this book, you'll learn how easy it is for an innocent person to be convicted of murder in Texas, how expensive it is to put someone to death, and the various sordid agendas that can play out in death-penalty cases. As such, this book is a pretty good substitute for reading a nonfiction book on the same subject . . . the risk of the innocent being condemned to death. If you doubt that can happen, check out some Web site that shows how many convicted "murderers" have been found innocent through DNA testing, many years after the fact of false incarceration and much suffering.

But that's probably not why you pick up a John Grisham novel about the law. You probably want to read great stuff about how corrupt lawyers are. There's definitely some legal malpractice here, but there's also some unselfish legal practice. All in all, the book won't satisfy most people who want to see lawyers discredited.

I also didn't find that the book contained enough suspense to keep my interest at a high level. It seemed to me that the twists and turns of the plot were thoroughly telegraphed well in advance.
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Format: Hardcover
Less than a week before the scheduled execution of Donté Drumm, convicted ten years ago for a murder he did not commit, the real killer steps forward. Travis Boyette, a convicted serial rapist on parole, approaches Keith Schroeder (a Christian minister) in Topeka and confesses to the murder. Boyette has an inoperable brain tumour, and feels bad about sending an innocent man to his death.

Reluctantly, Keith Schroeder agrees to drive Boyette to the town where the murder occurred in the hope that a confession will stop the scheduled execution of Drumm. Keith Schroeder joins forces with Donté Drumm's defence lawyer, Robbie Flak in the hope that they can at least halt the scheduled execution until Boyette's story is checked.

I enjoyed the first two thirds of this novel. While character development was sketchy, the urgency of the situation kept me turning pages. The facts about the case, the flimsy `evidence' upon which Donté Drumm was convicted all heightened the tension, especially when one of the witnesses admitted that he had falsely testified and as Boyette's claims are tested.

But then the narrative changed. The fiction became a vehicle against the death penalty and thriller became propaganda. This diminished the impact of the story, reduced my enjoyment of it and is reflected in my rating.

Jennifer Cameron-Smith
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sam9999 on Nov. 12 2010
Format: Hardcover
The Confession was an interesting read but it was so well padded, you would think John Grisham was being paid by the word
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Deena on Feb. 16 2011
Format: Hardcover
Really liked this book. Its been a while since I read Grisham books, and I remember why I liked them. The Confession is a great read, highly recommend if you are a JG fan.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By S. Russell Schumacher on April 7 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a book about which John Grisham clearly felt deeply - perhaps because he has recently become concerned about wrongful convictions, and the treatment of that theme here has a very passionate edge. Although Grisham has dealt with the countdown to an execution before in The Chamber, a similar plot device here has produced even more focused results. Grisham has translated his thoughts about what the real killer might be thinking and doing into an unsettling narrative, as the last hours of life ebb away for an innocent mann. The real killer's identity is given away at the beginning of The Confession.

Texas at the end of the last century: Travis Boyette is a deeply unpleasant man, unhappy with his worthless life. He is seduced by the thought that some small measure of comfort may be snatched by terrorising and subjugating another human being. His victim is to be a popular girl, a high-school student. He abducts, rapes and murders her before hiding her body.

But any fears that he might harbour about being tried for the crime vanish when an innocent man, Donté Drumm (where does Grisham find his names?), is arrested. Drumm, a local football star, finds himself the prime suspect and is convicted. Nine years pass on death row, and the stays of execution for Drumm are exhausted. He is to die in four days. The wretched killer, Boyette, has had a change of heart: a brain tumour and his own imminent death have persuaded him that he must make a clean breast of the murder. But is it too late?

The Confession is an airing for the beliefs of the author, but it is also a page-turner. Grisham is careful never to preach.
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