The Constant Gardener and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading The Constant Gardener on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Constant Gardener [Paperback]

John Le Carre
3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (111 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 19.00
Price: CDN$ 13.72 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 5.28 (28%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Usually ships within 1 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

July 27 2010

LOVE. AT ANY COST.

NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE FROM FOCUS FEATURES, STARRING RALPH FIENNES AND RACHEL WEISZ

Tessa Quayle-young, beautiful, and dearly beloved to husband Justin-is gruesomely murdered in northern Kenya. When Justin sets out on a personal odyssey to uncover the mystery of her death, what he finds could make him not only a suspect but also a target for Tessa's killers.

A master chronicler of the betrayals of ordinary people caught in political conflict, John le Carré portrays the dark side of unbridled capitalism as only he can. In The Constant Gardener he tells a compelling, complex story of a man elevated through tragedy as Justin Quayle-amateur gardener, aging widower, and ineffectual bureaucrat-discovers his own natural resources and the extraordinary courage of the woman he barely had time to love.


 

 


Frequently Bought Together

The Constant Gardener + The Mission Song + Our Game
Price For All Three: CDN$ 41.16

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

  • The Mission Song CDN$ 13.72
  • Our Game CDN$ 13.72

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

From Amazon

There were those who feared that the end of the Cold War would deal a fatal blow to the creativity of many first-rate thriller writers who specialised in this territory. In the case of John le Carré, this would have meant the loss of not only Britain's finest thriller writer, but a serious novelist of quite as much literary gravitas as any of his mainstream contemporaries. Certainly, The Spy Who Came In From The Cold remains as utterly compelling today as when it was written, whereas such post-cold war le Carré themes as financial double-dealing seemed to inspire him less than the world of shifting identity he had dealt in so skilfully. But with The Constant Gardener, we have the author once again firing on all cylinders. The characterisation is as elegant and expressive as ever, the prose as limpid and forceful. But, most of all, le Carré has found a theme quite as pregnant as any he has handled in the past: the malign, deceptively ameliorative world of global pharmaceuticals. In the new novel, the customary themes of betrayal and danger are explored in a narrative that exerts a total grip throughout its considerable length. His protagonist, Justin Quayle, is an unreflective British diplomat whose job in the British High Commission in Nairobi suggests one of Graham Greene's dispossessed protagonists trying to survive in the sultry corruption of foreign climates. President Arap Moi's Kenya is a country in the grip of AIDS, while political machinations maintain a deadly status quo. When Quayle's wife (who has taken more interest in what is happening around her than her husband) is killed, his investigation of her murder leads him into a murky web of exploitation involving Kenyan greed and a major pharmaceutical company eager to promote its "wonder cure" for tuberculosis. As Quayle looks deeper into the company which his wife had been investigating, all he has carefully built around him begins to crumble. The steady accumulation of tension and rigorous delineation of character is emblematic of le Carré at his finest, and it is a tremendous pleasure to find the author so resolutely back on form, fired with a real sense of anger at the duplicity of the modern world:
"Specious, unadulterated, pompous Foreign Office bullshit, if you want its full name... trade isn't making the poor rich. Profits don't buy reforms. They buy corrupt government officials and Swiss bank accounts".
--Barry Forshaw (This Review refers to the hardback edition of this title) --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From Publishers Weekly

As the world seems to move ever further beyond the comparatively clear-cut choices of the Cold War into a moral morass in which greed and cynicism seem the prime movers, le Carr 's work has become increasingly radical, and this is by far his most passionately angry novel yet. Its premise is similar to that of Michael Palmer's Miracle CureDcynical pharmaceutical firm allied with devious doctors attempts to foist on the world a flawed but potentially hugely profitable drugDbut the difference is in the setting and the treatment. Le Carr has placed the prime action in Africa, where the drug is being surreptitiously tested on poor villagers. Tessa Quayle, married to a member of the British High Commission staff in corruption-riddled contemporary Kenya, gets wind of it and tries in vain to blow the whistle on the manufacturer and its smarmy African distributor. She is killed for her pains. At this point Justin Quayle, her older, gentlemanly husband, sets out to find out who killed her, and to stop the dangerous drug himselfDat a terrible cost. Le Carr 's manifold skills at scene-setting and creating a range of fearsomely convincing English characters, from the bluffly absurd to the irredeemably corrupt, are at their smooth peak here. Both The Tailor of Panama and Single & Single were feeling their way toward this wholehearted assault on the way the world works, by a man who knows much better than most novelists writing today how it works. Now subject and style are one, and the result is heart-wrenching. (Jan. 9) Forecast: Admirers of the author who may have found some of the moral ambiguities and overelaborate set pieces of his last two books less than top-drawer le Carr will welcome a return to his best form. There is a wonderfully charismatic and idealistic heroine, which will bolster female readership, and the appearance of the book shortly after the release of a movie of Tailor (starring Jamie Lee Curtis) is bound to create an extra rush of media attention. Be prepared for the biggest le Carr sales in years.
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
The news hit the British High Commission in Nairobi at nine-thirty on a Monday morning. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Not a Thriller March 16 2002
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I'm not sure what le Carre was going for here. Some read him for suspense. Others enjoy the riveting psychological portraits of his characters. I was looking for a bit of both and was also interested to see his take on Africa, since the book is set in Kenya. In the end, I felt cheated on all three counts. The storyline is banal, with none of the plot twists one might expect. The characters are mostly one-dimensional, with the possible exception of the protagonist. And Africa is little more than a stage prop. The few marginal African characters are either corrupt thugs or saintly sufferers.
It seems that le Carre intended some sort of moral message here -- something along the lines of "big multinational drug companies are bad . . . really, really bad" -- and decided to wrap a story around his outrage. If that was indeed his intent, he failed on that score, too, because he just isn't convincing. The conspiracies he describes are a bit too over the top in their evilness and are filled with cartoonish bad guys, straining credulity. Those who already believe the worst about international corporations and their government co-conspirators will probably find validation in this book. But those looking for a good, old-fashioned thriller or a compelling character sketch are likely to be disappointed.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Another Cold War Jan. 4 2002
Format:Hardcover
John leCarre of Cold War espionage fame has over the years widened his scope, while still giving us the insider's look into the worlds of diplomats and spies--which turn out not to be so separate at all. I need not rehash the plot, other than to say that this is intelligently written and suspenseful, a great read as most of LeCarre's books are. The author raises many ethical issues that are hard to resolve, but bear considering. The major issue in the book, testing of a drug that is still unsafe on an unsuspecting poor population, and a cover up of the bad results, is clearly abhorrent. But LeCarre raises more subtle issues.What are the developed world's obligations to the third world in the case of pharma companies? How far must we go in protecting their patent rights if the result is denying access to the poor? Is exclusive protection in rich nations sufficient reward, and should we let generics be developed much more quickly where they are needed? LeCarre raises issues about the basic morality and efficacy of a simple issue like food aid--should we continue it if doing so requires making deals with the very governments which pursue a fruitless civil war that causes the famine in the first place? And of course LeCarre brilliantly paints the world of diplomacy and its compromises.
If all this profound thinking scares you away, don't let it. LeCarre includes an unprobable, doomed love story, a mystery to unravel, and a few surprises along the way as characters slowly reveal their true selves. This one is an intelligent page turner of high quality.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Le carre jolts your conscience! Dec 12 2001
Format:Mass Market Paperback
John Le Carre is back with another great book. This time however, there is a change in the subject as well as technique. It is not one more espionage-spy thriller which has been the forte of Le Carre, but rather a subject which has been Robin Cook's domain. Yet, Le Carre has done full justice to the subject in his own inimitable style and has come out with a winner.
Le Carre's hallmarks of seamless narration, manipulation of the suspense, exquisite prose, investigative process, immaculate detailing, depth of understanding are all there. What is most appealing and touching is the passion. The plot:
British High Commission- Nairobi. The news comes to the chief of the administration Sandy that Tessa Quayle 25, the young and beautiful social activist wife of 40 year old Justin Quayle, the first secretary in the embassy has been murdered in a remote corner of Africa, alongwith her driver. Her companion -cum-Guru, Dr, Bluhm, A Nigerian doctor also an aid worker has gone missing. Tessa was a fiercely independent minded, jolly, daring aid worker affiliated to an UN agency. Tessa had strong opinions and didn't mind calling a spade a spade.
Justin Quayle, a mild mannered, simple-minded gentleman is shocked at the sudden death of his beloved wife. Justin had given full freedom and autonomy to Tessa who was half his age and had never bothered to find out what she was up to, and never interfered in her personal or professional life.
Justin is disturbed by the happenings around him. His colleagues and seniors, while expressing their deep sympathy and understanding are subtly questioning him to elicit some unknown information. Newspapers and local rags are printing all kinds of nonsensical stories: Tessa was in love with Dr.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Brave Cold World Dec 9 2001
Format:Mass Market Paperback
When I turned the last page of Le Carre's latest novel, it occurred to me that it symbolized the dawn of a new millennium the way that Tom Wolfe's, "The Bonfire of the Vanities"(that journalistic presentation of a fictionalized circus)epitomized the eighties; and to a large extent how Martin Amis', "London Field's", in a more metaphysical tone heralded the future of the nineties and beyond.
Sandy, Alison, sir Bernard, Donohue, represent the careerist-minded oxbridge? establishment. The type, who comfortably nurtured, inculcated, and educated; and adequately(if not overly so) clever enough for everyone's good, could begin to sort out some of this planet's most obviously stickier problems.
I understand that the cocktail party circuit, to some extent, makes living in Washington D.C. bearable unless you can afford a penthouse in NYC and scoot up for the weekends. It is very easy to imagine any normally decent social climber with influence in the dualistic quandary of deciding between the ethical and the expediant, without making those careful calculations behind their eyelids as how many guest lists they might be written off of. Maybe we should commiserate with the Clintons', who successfully made the leap from Little Rock to the Georgetown/Upper East Side/Westchester County/Martha's Vineyard circles through much flack. Hurray for them.
"The Constant Gardener" speaks for itself. As with the two aforementioned novels by Amis and Wolfe, it is suggested necessary reading to understand our current political age. Le Carre delivers a definitive update to the classic cold war spy story.
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Most recent customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars A fictionalized version of unethical drug company practices
Fiction is not my cup of tea. I simply don't care what a person looked like, what he thought or felt, and whom he loved, least of all when that person never really existed. Read more
Published on Aug. 8 2011 by Mira de Vries
1.0 out of 5 stars Very weak and unfocused.
Like a few others, this was the first, and last Le Carre book I'll read.
I just finished reading the book, and I have to say I thought that it was extremely weak. Read more
Published on Nov. 24 2008 by Jessie Michael Lange
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant; LeCarre's a craftsman
This is a brilliant book. This is not just 'a great read'. This is actually literature, it's so well written. The story is crafted, it does not hurry but it is not at all slow. Read more
Published on March 9 2007 by musicartlit
3.0 out of 5 stars Decent airplane reading
This is a decent book for reading on a plane or when you're tired; well written enough not to be irritating, but still in the totally undemanding "popcorn" category. Read more
Published on June 11 2004 by Bortukan
3.0 out of 5 stars Secrets
This book poses Le Carre's view of the world - that is, people get stuck in a web of lies but only a few dare to break out and do something about it. Read more
Published on April 30 2004 by tessa
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting...But, not a treasure.
Enjoyed most of the story, the plot depth and the up-to-date scenario, but the ending was rather unimaginative and trivial. Read more
Published on April 13 2004
2.0 out of 5 stars Not a feel-good experience
This was my first Le Carre book, and likely my last. If you're in the mood for an honest by hopeful message, this book isn't for you. Read more
Published on June 6 2002
1.0 out of 5 stars Bloody awful
I left this book angry that I had invested so much time in it.
Published on May 18 2002
1.0 out of 5 stars a bee in his bonnet doesn't make for good reading
So I'm staring down the barrel of a 36-hour plane ride, and wouldn't you know it, I left my book at the hotel. Read more
Published on April 28 2002 by Olly Buxton
5.0 out of 5 stars spectacular book
John Le-Carre is one of the most important writers of our time, to my opinion. He gives us the tools to understand the milieu of international relations in the world we live in -... Read more
Published on April 25 2002
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback