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The Dark Path [Mass Market Paperback]

Walter H. Hunt
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

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Book Description

July 29 2004 Dark Wing (Book 2)
Walter Hunt's debut novel, The Dark Wing was favorably compared to Ender's Game, Babylon 5, Honor Harrington, and C. S. Forester . . . and the story isn't over yet!

Man and zor, once sworn enemies engaged in a mutual campaign of xenocide, now live side by side.

The war is over, and Admiral Marais, the legendary "Dark Wing"--both Angel of Death and Species Savior--is long dead, though some of his companions and participants in that great war still survive and have even chosen to live among the zor.

Now a mystery from the past has become a threat to the present when an unholy menace jeopardizes both humans and zor alike.

Whole space fleets have disappeared, with survivors stricken mad.

And now man and zor alike must join forces to meet this adversary head on. . . .

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From Publishers Weekly

In this gripping sequel to The Dark Wing (2001), Hunt does a better job of depicting character and handling zor mythology and interspecies relations than in his debut novel. Humanity and the winged zor are now staunch allies, but the lurking alien menace hinted at in The Dark Wing, the shape-changing, mind-controlling vulh, now roars on stage red in tooth and claw. In the best tradition of Honor Harrington, Commodore Jacqueline Laperriere, commander of an outpost on the planet Cicero, breaks the rules to save some of her troops and warn others. Later Jackie must re-enact the quest of Qu'u, the legendary zor hero, on the Plain of Despite, seeking an ancient weapon that holds the key to defeating the vulh. While the ending may be a trifle rushed, it offers plenty of surprises.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

This fine sequel to Hunt's Dark Wing (2001) reads somewhat like a collaboration of David Weber and Orson Scott Card. It sports a valiant space navy, represented by Commodore Jacqueline Lapierre, an officer well suited to sit at the same table as Weber's Honor Harrington. And it includes the implacable vuhl, a shape-changing, mind-controlling, insectoid enemy race that recalls the original foes of Card's Ender Wiggin. The alien zor, formerly implacable enemies of humanity, are now staunch allies against the vuhl. Lapierre and her zor exec, Ch'ke'te, elude an early vuhl attack, after which they must play roles out of zor legend to retrieve a legendary talisman that holds the key to their common survival. Imaginative twists include the facts that the human and zor quest team employs the telepathic assistance of Ch'ke'te's dead mate, Th'an'ya, and that some human POWs are finding out how to penetrate vuhl disguises. Gripping stuff that, fortunately, presages a further book. Roland Green
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars Great . . . Except for the Ending Dec 6 2003
Format:Hardcover
For the first 95% of this book, I would have to say it is one of the most entertaining sci-fi books I have ever read, and very well-crafted. The end, however, was a total disappointment. It was as if the author suddenly got tired of writing and had to tie up some loose ends in the last 25 or so pages (King's "The Stand" comes to mind in this regard). Even assuming that this was not the real ending (i.e. there will be a sequel) it wasn't a customary pre-sequel ending, keeping the reader in suspense on what might happen next -- it just kind of fizzles out. I just found it odd in such an otherwise wonderful piece of writing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not just another sci-fi yarn Feb. 26 2003
Format:Hardcover
If I didn't know Walter Hunt personally, I would wonder what kind of deranged mind could conjure up not just one, but at least two entirely alien races, complete with their own unique mythologies and philosophies. But I do know Mr. Hunt, and I know that these aliens have inhabited his imagination for many, many years, perhaps since his high school days.
Drawing on his expert writing techniques -- he has been writing at least that long -- he draws these aliens for us readers with such meticulous care that we experience them exactly as he sees them, full of foreign emotion and consistent motivation. He has not taken leave of his senses. Rather, he employs them with art and skill. His human characters inhabit a world that rings as true as any that a hard-core science fiction reader can find published today. The depth of detail, the intensity of emotion, and complexity of his plots involve the reader so completely that comparison seems ludicrous. While he might have many influences, the prose that Walter Hunt writes is inimitably his own.
The Zor are winged bipeds whose culture blends hard science with a spirituality as real to them as their daily meals. They communicate not just by words, but by gestures whose very meaning is lost on most humans. Over eighty standard years have passed since the Zor Wars (see Mr. Hunt's first novel THE DARK WING), and they are now staunch allies of the human empire. But even as the two species remain at peace, prejudice and distrust lurk among the human population, while confusion and misunderstanding dwell among the zor. Yet this merely serves as the backdrop for THE DARK PATH. The action comes fast and furious, involving a new, perhaps unbeatable threat. And Mr.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great storytelling! Feb. 10 2003
Format:Hardcover
Set in the universe that Hunt introduced in "The Dark Wing", "The Dark Path" is the first book in a larger story (that will take at least a couple more books to complete, I guess), and Hunt has me hooked!
Like "Dark Wing", this is classic space-opera sci-fi of the highest order. The plot is complex and compelling, the characters are well-drawn and sympathetic, and the story is finely crafted and well-paced, combining mystery and action in a way that will keep you in its grip until the final page, and leave you wanting more.
I can't wait to read the next installment!
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5.0 out of 5 stars delightful military science fiction Feb. 7 2003
Format:Hardcover
The war between the birdlike Zor and humanity is over with the two species now at peace. Still not everything is idyllic in the galaxy. Known for their psychic ability, the Zor panic when the High Lord dreams of a nightmarish assault from the feral species residing in the racial memory of his people as demons. Also two human vessels have vanished and a rescue effort to save the missing crew fails.
On the Cicero Naval Base, Commodore Jacqueline Laperriere and her XO Ch'K'te the Zor learn that the "demons"(aliens) have used their powers to change shapes to infiltrate the outpost. The Vulh with their mind control abilities and their talent to phsyically mimic anyone including a commander and an XO have arrived. The only hope for mankind is Jacqueline, but her superior thinks otherwise, while the Zor believes she is the reincarnation of the legendary Zor hero Qu'u, here to defeat the Vulh if she can find the ancient weapon that succeeded once before.
THE DARK WING was an exciting war of the worlds that showcases a new talent in the military science fiction category. THE DARK PATH is a better tale as Walter H. Hunt provides incredible depth to the interspecies relationships yet never loses sight of the action expected by sub-genre readers. The story line is superb because the audience obtains a stronger understanding of the Zor, better insight into how humans relate to this species, and introduces in flaming red terror the Vulh. Obviously the military crowd will enjoy this thriller, but outer space sci fi fans will appreciate the novel too,
Harriet Klausner
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5.0 out of 5 stars delightful military science fiction Feb. 7 2003
Format:Hardcover
The war between the birdlike Zor and humanity is over with the two species now at peace. Still not everything is idyllic in the galaxy. Known for their psychic ability, the Zor panic when the High Lord dreams of a nightmarish assault from the feral species residing in the racial memory of his people as demons. Also two human vessels have vanished and a rescue effort to save the missing crew fails.
On the Cicero Naval Base, Commodore Jacqueline Laperriere and her XO Ch'K'te the Zor learn that the "demons"(aliens) have used their powers to change shapes to infiltrate the outpost. The Vulh with their mind control abilities and their talent to phsyically mimic anyone including a commander and an XO have arrived. The only hope for mankind is Jacqueline, but her superior thinks otherwise, while the Zor believes she is the reincarnation of the legendary Zor hero Qu'u, here to defeat the Vulh if she can find the ancient weapon that succeeded once before.
THE DARK WING was an exciting war of the worlds that showcases a new talent in the military science fiction category. THE DARK PATH is a better tale as Walter H. Hunt provides incredible depth to the interspecies relationships yet never loses sight of the action expected by sub-genre readers. The story line is superb because the audience obtains a stronger understanding of the Zor, better insight into how humans relate to this species, and introduces in flaming red terror the Vulh. Obviously the military crowd will enjoy this thriller, but outer space sci fi fans will appreciate the novel too,
Harriet Klausner
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