The Descent and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading The Descent on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Descent [Mass Market Paperback]

Jeff Long
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (223 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 9.99
Price: CDN$ 9.49 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 0.50 (5%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Monday, September 22? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition --  
Hardcover --  
Paperback --  
Mass Market Paperback CDN $9.49  
Audio, Cassette, Abridged --  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Jan. 17 2002
We are not alone…In a cave in the Himalayas, a guide discovers a self-mutilated body with the warning--Satan exists. In the Kalahari Desert, a nun unearths evidence of a proto-human species and a deity called Older-than-Old. In Bosnia, something has been feeding upon the dead in a mass grave. So begins mankind’s most shocking realization: that the underworld is a vast geological labyrinth populated by another race of beings. Some call them devils or demons. But they are real. They are down there. And they are waiting for us to find them…

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

From Amazon

In a high Himalayan cave, among the death pits of Bosnia, in a newly excavated Java temple, Long's characters find out to their terror that humanity is not alone--that, as we have always really known, horned and vicious humanoids lurk in vast caverns beneath our feet. This audacious remaking of the old hollow-earth plot takes us, in no short order, to the new world regime that follows the genocidal harrowing of Hell by heavily armed, high-tech American forces. An ambitious tycoon sends an expedition of scientists, including a beautiful nun linguist and a hideously tattooed commando former prisoner of Hell, ever deeper into the unknown, among surviving, savage, horned tribes and the vast citadels of the civilizations that fell beneath the earth before ours arose. A conspiracy of scholars pursues the identity of the being known as Satan, coming up with unpalatable truths about the origins of human culture and the identity of the Turin Shroud, and are picked off one by bloody one. Long rehabilitates, madly, the novel of adventures among lost peoples--occasional clumsiness and promises of paranoid revelations on which he cannot entirely deliver fail to diminish the real achievement here; this feels like a story we have always known and dreaded. --Roz Kaveney, Amazon.co.uk --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

The premise of this millennial thriller is as audacious as it is problematic: "if there can be a historical Christ," one character hypothesizes, "why not a historic Satan?" Demystification of the ultimate Bad Guy is no easy feat, but Long (Angels of Light) brings it off, if just barely, in a dizzying synthesis of supernatural horror, lost-race fantasy and military SF. From the experiences of a varied cast of charactersAincluding Sister Ali, a Catholic nun serving in South Africa, and Elias Branch, a major with NATO forces in BosniaAa 21st-century think tank calling itself the Beowulf Circle distills a startling theory: The biblical Satan and his devils in Hell are mythic renderings of Homo hadalis, grotesquely malformed offshoots of Homo sapiens who for centuries have surfaced from underground hideouts to prey on human beings. With the help of Ike Crockett, an escapee from 10 years of "hadal" captivity, Beowulf infiltrates the Helios Corporation's mission to explore caverns honeycombing Earth's interior. Once beneath the Mariana Trench, Beowulf discovers that Helios intends to forcefully annex the world inside the earth's crust to further its business ambitions. Meanwhile, topside, Beowulf's theologians and metaphysicians surmise that the elusive "Satan" has evolved a human form to pass secretly among mankind. Like the subterranean trail blazed by its adventurers, the narrative twists, turns, dead-ends and backtracks. Inventive scenes of underground wonders alternate with talky stretches of scientific discourse and mawkish moments of romance between Ike and Ali. Though its devils prove disappointingly to be made in the image of humans, Long's novel brims with energy, ideas and excitement. 150,000 first printing; major ad/promo; film rights sold to Warner Bros. (July)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
In the beginning was the word. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars I really enjoyed this book June 26 2004
By Beamer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I really enjoyed this book, though I admit I may have been seduced by the concept.
One of the opening chapters, the one in Bosnia, struck me as one of the creepiest I've ever read. From there is mention of a surprise attack taking out significant world forces as their guard was low. Again, an interesting idea that is well presented and really brought me into the book.
The characters, though, are definitely not entirely likable. Nor are they really there too like. They're heavily flawed people, outcasts mostly, and behave as such. I believe this to be intentional on the writer's part, and will not penalize him for it.
The adventure is mostly well done. The science may be wonky, but the writing is solid and intelligent. The latter point might truly be why I enjoyed this book, intelligence. All too often these wonky-science-adventure books completely lack any form of intelligence. Here you can see thought being put behind everything, which the author deserves great credit for.
The only flaw I found was that science was being used to explain everything, satisfyingly, then mysticism crept in from nowhere. Satan became a supernatural being, not a scientific one. A massive flaw, in my mind. Why go in that direction after spending so much time keeping it in the other? The mind-transfer effect was just pointless.
I read this book a long time ago, during a lonely week halfway across the world. It entranced me at the time, and I found it to be a very worthy read. Looking back I'm no longer as impressed, but still consider it worth the four stars. Similar books by similar authors have resulted in twists you knew would come and plot holes larger than the story itself.
This book is different. Absolutely worth reading.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars I really enjoyed this book June 26 2004
By Beamer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I really enjoyed this book, though I admit I may have been seduced by the concept.
One of the opening chapters, the one in Bosnia, struck me as one of the creepiest I've ever read. From there is mention of a surprise attack taking out significant world forces as their guard was low. Again, an interesting idea that is well presented and really brought me into the book.
The characters, though, are definitely not entirely likable. Nor are they really there too like. They're heavily flawed people, outcasts mostly, and behave as such. I believe this to be intentional on the writer's part, and will not penalize him for it.
The adventure is mostly well done. The science may be wonky, but the writing is solid and intelligent. The latter point might truly be why I enjoyed this book, intelligence. All too often these wonky-science-adventure books completely lack any form of intelligence. Here you can see thought being put behind everything, which the author deserves great credit for.
I read this book a long time ago, during a lonely week halfway across the world. It entranced me at the time, and I found it to be a very worthy read. Looking back I'm no longer as impressed, but still consider it worth the four stars. Similar books by similar authors have resulted in twists you knew would come and plot holes larger than the story itself.
This book is different. Absolutely worth reading.
Was this review helpful to you?
2.0 out of 5 stars To Hell and back June 15 2004
By Noctem
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The Descent. This could have been a classic. Judging by the premise, that is. It seems Hell is real. And it's filled with demonic minions. All beneath your feet. For underneath the surface of the planet, far underneath the surface, lay a vast network of tunnels inhabited by a mysterious, and ancient, race. So old, in fact, that they pre-date any known human civilization. And it seems that they are the root of man's concept of an underworld repository of condemned souls. In other words, Hell. For these beings, known as Hadals, are horned and utterly sadistic. They thrive on torture. Or do they? Big Business and Government are determined to find out. What they discover is not so much a lost race of killers, but an historical and geological treasure trove. Unfortunately, this is a central weakness of the novel: for Long quickly despinses with the idea that the underground dwellers are hellish beasts. They are, merely, primitive. And so goes the fear factor. Indeed, it was thought that their leader was behind the concept of Satan. But as it turns out, the Devil is just another cult leader. Jeff Long could have really created a nightmare. But instead of Stephen King, we get Jules Verne. And not a very good one. First off, none of the characters are likable. And worse, everything they say is dull. There are several strange encounters with the Hadals thrown through out the book, but these encounters have a very jarring effective on the narrative. Long also has a rather odd literary detachment with his technological descriptions, as if he were determined not to write science fiction. Many important questions are never answered, lost in the [extremely] quick exposition of the books opening. It was clear that Jeff Long wanted to blend genres: Horror, sci-fi, thriller, but simply lacked the talent to pull it off. What he created was a tale that has interesting moments, but came across as a jumbled mess.
Was this review helpful to you?
1.0 out of 5 stars A pretty dumb book April 20 2004
By Mattman
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The premise for this book is awesome--turns out "demons" are living at the center of the earth, torturing people and wreaking havoc in secret. It starts out solidly, too--very exciting and darn scary, and when they started talking about the Origins of Satan, I was starting to think it would end up as some kind've Davinci Code-type mind-bender combined with an Aliens-type shoot 'em up.
But man, Jeff Long can't deliver on the goods in an enormous way. For one--the Beowulf Circle doesn't do anything. They talk about researching Satan, traveling the world, but Long never actually SHOWS it. They just gather AFTERWARDS, and blabber about it (and it's really clunky, awkward dialogue too). And when they finally come up with a hypothesis to Satan's true identity? Please.
Also, I kinda felt like the hadals are still an unknown quantity. Who are they? Where do they come from?? And most importantly, WHY are Satan and his minions so evil??? And I don't mean to ask "why is there evil", but I just don't understand why the hadals are bloodthirsty savages who will torture you to insanity. I won't spoil it for anyone, but a lot of things happen that seem very "out of character" for the hadals. Basically, I stopped being afraid of them, and that's something Long needed to prevent.
Human reaction to this stuff? Very unrealistic. I find it hard to believe that people wouldn't be more outraged or driven to wipe them off the face of the earth. If a foreign country tortured and killed millions of Americans the way the Hadals did, they'd be a crater.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Descent
The Descent

Just as I anticipated. A real page turner.
Great story, Exciting to read.
I can only hope, there is a sequel to his last novel, DEEPER.
Published 17 months ago by william e robitaille
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Novel
A well written and intriguing novel, I would be glad to recommend this story to anyone with a thirst for the unexpected. Read more
Published on Nov. 20 2010 by Chenz
5.0 out of 5 stars THIS BOOK HAS NO EQUAL !!!
What a amazing and indepth look at what is so crucial in all the religions and cultures around the world. Read more
Published on June 1 2005 by Matt Gawelczyk
5.0 out of 5 stars The most scary intro I ever read
The most scary intro I ever read.
Published on June 30 2004 by Magnus Burman
5.0 out of 5 stars Awsome
This book is by far the best book I have ever read. I could not stop turning the pages....only hope that his next book is half as good !!!!
Published on June 24 2004 by Paul McHugh
3.0 out of 5 stars what could have been............
This was a good book. Yes, a very good book. I would have preferred he spend more time on the hadals' emergence from the subplanet, though. Read more
Published on May 29 2004 by Brian P. Kelder
5.0 out of 5 stars The Descent (Review)
This is a modern day Jules Verne with a twist! This is an excellent read...one you will not regret.
Published on May 25 2004 by Angela
3.0 out of 5 stars Congo + Indiana Jones + Esau + Dante's Inferno = The Descent
The book is sort of a mish-mash of ideas from Crichton's Congo, Kerr's Esau, Indiana Jones and Dante's Inferno with an interesting twist. Read more
Published on April 12 2004 by Snehanshu Shah
3.0 out of 5 stars Engaging, but Choppy
This book has an interesting premise - a real hell, with real demons - but the author threw the plot together loosely around this idea, and it shows. Read more
Published on March 23 2004 by ghost
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback