The Devil's Door: A Catherine LeVendeur Mystery and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Devil's Door Audio Cassette – Aug 11 1999


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio Cassette
"Please retry"
CDN$ 85.94

Best Canadian Books of 2014
Stone Mattress is our #1 Canadian pick for 2014. See all
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Books on Tape, Inc. (Aug. 11 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0736646639
  • ISBN-13: 978-0736646635
  • Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 15 x 7.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 544 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Countess Alys of Tonnerre, victim of a brutal beating, is barely alive when her husband Raynald brings her to the Abbess Heloise at the convent of the Paraclete in medieval France. Young Catherine LeVendeur, who helps care for Alys, is disturbed by scars that attest to the woman's prior mistreatment. Upon the Countess's death, the Paraclete inherits a small piece of unimpressive land, which sets off a furor: Raynald claims the convent stole the property, and the prior of a nearby monastery makes a handsome offer for it. Catherine maintains her intense curiosity about Alys's unhappy end even through the arrival of her betrothed, Edgar of Wedderlie, with Peter Abelard; after Catherine and Edgar's wedding, the pair travel to Troyes and, at Heloise's request, search for information on the mysterious bequest. Catherine soons stumbles on another mystery: the discovery of a headless corpse that may ignite the anti-Semitism that is running high during this Easter season of A.D. 1140. With this meticulously prepared work, Newman ( Death Comes as Epiph any ) adroitly crafts a puzzle in which the intriguing medieval material, providing much more than mere background, informs the entire novel with a vivid sense of past and guides the responses of the engaging, lively cast.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

Fresh from her sleuthing in Death Comes As Epiphany (1993), 12th-century novice nun Catherine LeVendeur will leave the convent of Abbess H‚lo‹se and marry Edgar, student of the now frail Peter Abelard. The pair will take on dangers with derring-do to solve the curious murder of a young countess named Alys, whose death has something to do with property bequeathed to the convent and the tangled fortunes of a particularly nasty family. Among the puzzlements: Alys's sister, a silent nun presumed dead to the world, and her bitter secret; the death and dismemberment of a mild gossip; an assault on a convent nun; the tangled motives of the dead countess's horrid mother, who has lethal plans for snooping Catherine. Throughout, there are congenial chats with kin, the like-minded, and the high-minded. Catherine's father, a ``Jewish apostate,'' has ongoing problems, as does the beleaguered Abelard, headed for condemnation by the Council of Sens. With richly satisfying settings, this smooth mystery is tight as a tambour. Top-notch sleuthing, classy with Latin saws and observations. -- Copyright ©1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By A Customer on Sept. 29 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I can't really judge if this is an accurate medieval setting, although it is a very vivid one. The problem here is the plot. At the end of the book, I am left completely baffled by the motives of the main actors. I won't discuss it in any detail, since I don't want to spoil the plot, but they must have been relatively stupid since they could have accomplished their purposes in a simple and straightforward way that would have avoided a lot of grief. A friend of mine would roll her eyes at this point and tell me that their motive is simple: if they behaved sensibly, there wouldn't be a plot. Silly me.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Aug. 21 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As a student of Medieval History and an avid reader of bothmystery novels and historical novels this book was right up my alley. Newman's characters are lively and the plot moves quickly and logically, though not necessarily predictably. I have read two books in this series and am eager to read the rest of them. I would highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a light mystery read with an historical setting. I have read this book twice myself. END
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Debbie Terrill on June 28 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the 2nd in the Catherine LeVendeur series, and is every bit as enjoyable as the first. Edgar and Catherine are a great sleuthing pair, and the 12th century detail is fascinating. I also appreciate Newman's character development; even minor characters are well-developed and interesting.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
The Devil's Door Aug. 21 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As a student of Medieval History and an avid reader of bothmystery novels and historical novels this book was right up my alley. Newman's characters are lively and the plot moves quickly and logically, though not necessarily predictably. I have read two books in this series and am eager to read the rest of them. I would highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a light mystery read with an historical setting. I have read this book twice myself. END
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
A Good Read June 28 2000
By Debbie Terrill - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the 2nd in the Catherine LeVendeur series, and is every bit as enjoyable as the first. Edgar and Catherine are a great sleuthing pair, and the 12th century detail is fascinating. I also appreciate Newman's character development; even minor characters are well-developed and interesting.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A Fine Medieval Mystery. Oct. 10 2003
By S. Schwartz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio Cassette
Reading Ms. Newman's books reveals her love for the era that she writes in. She is very familiar with the 12th century, and her books are very well researched. I like Catherine and Edgar, although they do get a bit silly at times, but I'm sure they will mature nicely. They do manage to get in some pretty odious situations, as well as dangerous ones. In this book Catherine and Edgar are pulled into a family secret that results in three deaths and a lot of unhappiness. Both of them face danger, but manage to triumph, partly because of their love for each other. A good historical read!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Great historical mystery with a mix of real and fictional characters Dec 21 2013
By plb3 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This novel, the second in this series by Sharan Newman, continúes the adventures of Catherine LeVendeur, the daughter of a Paris-based trader in wine and other goods. Catherine is a serious young woman with a strong belief in the power of rational thinking; in fact, she chose to join the community of the Paraclete, led by Heloise, one time lover of Peter Abelard. Catherine has been sent on a mission by Heloise, trying to solve a mysterious death and discover why so many powerful people are trying to steal a small piece of land that has been ceded to the nuns. She is accompanied by Edgar, her new friend (and fiance) from Scotland. Both of them, singularly and in tandem face many dangers as the try to unpack the twisted strings of hidden relationships and hate.
For any reader with some background in Latin or Anglo-Saxon, each chapter begins with a short quotation that will have you dusting off your old language skills.
A trip into a medieval time Oct. 16 2009
By Clif - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio Cassette Verified Purchase
The story in this historical novel takes place during the time period leading up to the final confrontation between Bernard of Clairvaux and Peter Abelard at the council of Sens. (The novel says this occurred 1140 A.D.; Wikipedia says 1141 A.D.) This historical setting is peripheral to the fictional murder-mystery story, and is not an important part of the story. However, it places it firmly into a particular time in history. One of the things I appreciate most about Sharan Newman is her concern with accurately portraying the life and times surrounding the fictional plot.

The actual plot itself is quite contrived, but what murder mystery isn't contrived? The plot of this book contains a legal hearing (a trial) near its end that is worthy of a Perry Mason TV show with emotional outbursts from almost everybody present. There's even a missing human head in the story that appears near the end in a very public way. The story includes a primer on medieval smelting of iron. The main character gets married in this story so there's ample discussion of their frustrated honeymoon. There are plenty of hints toward the end that she may be pregnant, and at the very end we learn the truth.

One interesting aspect of the ten part Catherine LeVendeur series of novels is to try and figure out the thinking behind the selection of the book's title. The titles are always intriguing, but their application to the story tends to be obscure. This book is the second one in the series. I think anyone who enjoys the Brother Cadfael novels by Ellis Peters would also enjoy these novels as well.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback