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The Divorce from Hell: How the Justice System Failed a Family [Paperback]

Wendy Dennis
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Jan. 1 1998
Demographics - the study of human populations - are a powerful, but often underused, method for understanding the past and predicting the future. In Boom, Bust & Echo 2000: Profiting from the Demographic Shift in the New Millennium, economist David Foot and journalist Daniel Stoffman take a look at the importance of demographics. They try to predict what baby boomers, "baby busters", the "echo generation", and other groups in the coming years can expect. This fully-revised edition of the highly successful Boom, Bust &Echo contains the most recent information on demographic trends in Canada and how they can affect your future.

Demographics play a critical role in the nation's economy and social life, and they affect every one of us as individuals. The more we understand demographic realities, the better prepared we will be to cope with them - and to turn them to our advantage.

In Canada, the aging of those born between 1947 and 1966 - the baby boom generation - has changed the economy, driven housing and other markets, and transformed social mores and lifestyles. As the boomers enter mid-life, as the "baby-busters" behind them come of age, and as the "echo generation," the children of the boomers, reaches maturity, how will the country change? Where will Canadians choose to live? What are the prospects for employment? Which investments will be favoured? What lies ahead for Canada's health care and education systems?

Everyone who plans for the future - whether it be for a large corporation, a retail store, a school system, a nonprofit enterprise, or for personal well-being - needs effective forecasting tools. Boom, Bust & Echo 2000 goes beyond the traditional methods of focus groups and opinion surveys to an analysis of statistical facts. Here is an original and indispensable work filled with arresting insights, provocative assertions, and practical answers.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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"If you want to foretell the future, don't consult a horoscope or a crystal ball. Just consider that we tend to do different things at different times of our lives and that one year from now we'll be one year older. Apply those principles to the whole population and we can explain two-thirds of everything, according to David Foot. Looking ahead to the first decade of the new millennium, he forecasts more movies catering to teens and twenty-somethings, good times for beer merchants and retailers of self-assembly furniture, and continuing recovery in the rental housing market. That's because the echo boomers, as Dr. Foot dubs the children of the baby boomers, are growing up. But investors and marketers beware. Canada's echo boomers born between 1980 and 1995 are only two-thirds as numerous as the baby boomers born between 1947 and 1966. In the United States, there are 79 billion boomers and 76 million echo kids." -- Michael Kane, Financial Post, April 2, 1999 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

The fully expanded, updated and illustrated millennium edition of the national bestseller. Over 100 weeks on the bestseller lists. Over 250,000 copies sold!

Boom, Bust &Echo was the national phenomenon that demonstrated the power of demographics to help us understand the past and forecast the future. Now Boom Bust & Echo 2000 reveals Canada's demographic profile at the turn of the century when a new population shift will have profound implications for our economic and social life.

*Why, despite the inevitable market dips, stocks are a sound investment for the long term. * How the maturing of the echo generation makes the retail environment more complex. *Why private health care is flourishing while public health care needs reconstructive surgery. *How the aging of the echo is transforming Canada's education system. *Why our future prosperity depends upon understanding demographics, in Canada and around the world.

"Seldom is a book published that becomes required reading for just about everyone - business executives, entrepreneurs, policy makers, politicians, planners and educators ... It's a course on the importance of demographics and how the patterns they reveal can be capitalized on by forward-thinkers." - Marketing Magazine

"If you own a bicycle helmet you might want to wear it while you read [this] engaging study... Otherwise you could give yourself a headache as you periodically slap your forehead and cry out, 'Now why didn't I think of that?' " - Edmonton Journal --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
The problem with this approach is the simple assumption that a commodity enjoys demand depending on what age group it appeals to, and what is the percentage of this group within a country's population overall.
That is exactly the main argument of the author: show me the population trends, birth rates, percentage of age groups, and I will tell you what's going to be in demand.
This assumption needs to be defended more thoroughly, however. Education is a good example. Although birth rates declined in the US for the last 20 years, more people get university education today compared to the past. Obviously, the economy of the 21st century demands that.
Growth or decline rates of the population cannot be the only major independent variable predicting demand.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for anyone interested in Generations March 30 2000
Format:Paperback
While I am not a Canadian, I am quite sure that Foot's extensive research and theories hold quite well. I train and consult with organizations on the issue of diversity and generations on a regular basis, and this book was excellent reading for those who want to see that the "generations" diversity dimension is not limited to the United States.
Books on generations run the risk of making sweeping generalizations, but one must recognize that generations do indeed have distinct archetypes. Foot does what other authors do not often do, and focuses on the effects the generations will have on Canadian society rather than dwelling on the traits of each generation. Many of his theories can not be proven for years to come, but it does help marketers, managers, and anyone in society or business understand one aspect of why people disagree.
Using categories such as education, transit, companies, and other societal issues, Foot examines how each generation will change the societal outlook. This is extremely helpful for those who wish to make affect society in a positive way.
The United States' has a developed archetype for generations dating back to the 1500s (thanks Howe and Strauss), but it appears Canada is not that far along in developing traits and generational personalities. In many ways this is good...it provides less information for those to stereotype with. However, my guess is that books such as this will peak the interest of the Canadian population and future generations will be as neatly defined as Generation X and the Baby Boomers are in the United States. (Good or bad, you make the call.)
So, this is definitely a great book for foundational knowledge for Canadian generations. Foot is clearly a student of pop culture, and this book is likely the first of many that will address this topic.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
'Know your audience' is the first rule of communicating, and an essential tenet of dealing with people is to know them, especially if you want to persuade, motivate, or get them involved.

This book provides a fascinating look at how demographics can shape attitudes, beliefs and, most important, actions. The authors maintain that: "Demography, the study of human populations, is the most powerful-and most underutilized-tool we have to understand the past and to foretell the future.

Demographics affect every one of us as individuals, far more than most of us have ever imagined. They also play a pivotal role in economic and social life."

Boom, Bust and Echo is a very unique and interesting book; it is well worth reading for the insights that it provides into the behavior of consumers or, as the authors claim, at least two-thirds of that behavior.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Having a bookshelf full of futuristic reading including Boomernomics, Next, Pig and the Python and the complete series by H S Dent and many books from Harvard press as well as every new economy magazine printed I found myself continuing to reach for Boom Bust and Echo as it has more backbone, the chapters contain more substance and historical data to back it up. I commend this book to be carried at all times with a copy to be kept by the bed.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
The problem with this approach is the simple assumption that a commodity enjoys demand depending on what age group it appeals to, and what is the percentage of this group within a country's population overall.
That is exactly the main argument of the author: show me the population trends, birth rates, percentage of age groups, and I will tell you what's going to be in demand.
This assumption needs to be defended more thoroughly, however. Education is a good example. Although birth rates declined in the US for the last 20 years, more people get university education today compared to the past. Obviously, the economy of the 21st century demands that.
Grouth or decline rates of the population cannot be the only major independent variable predicting demand.
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