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The Doors [Blu-ray]

3.9 out of 5 stars 82 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Maple
  • Run Time: 138 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 82 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B000LW7OWE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #33,137 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on June 3 2008
Format: DVD
Calling this movie "The Doors" is misleading. It would be more accurate to call it "Jim Morrison, His Lovers and Groupies, and Occasionally Those Other Guys In the Band," since that is how it's presented.

It's always tempting to latch onto a rock legend in these rock biopics, and Oliver Stone clings like a limpet to the ghost of Jim Morrison, happily dousing him with the worst kind of glamor. Acid-soaked scenery and mysticism are in every scene, but Stone seems content to wallow in the rock'n'roll debauchery rather than get into Morrison's head.

It opens with a voiceover of Jim Morrison's poetry, as we slowly fade into a stalled recording session. Then it flips back to 1949, as Morrison's family drives through the desert. The boy catches a glimpse of several Indians by the road -- and one of them dies as the family leaves.

Then it flips ahead to Morrison's (Val Kilmer) years at college -- he crashes a party for a pretty girl named Pamela (Meg Ryan) who becomes his longtime lover, makes strange arty films, acid-trips in the desert, and devotes himself to his poetry. Then his pal Ray Manzarek (Kyle McLachlan) creates a rock band, with Morrison's poetry and voice as the centerpiece. Soon The Doors become a fixture in L.A. -- and then a famed band.

But as the Doors become more famous, Morrison increasingly loses himself in the messianic-Dionysian-rocker role that has been set out for him (partly by himself). His fame allows him to do all sorts of weird things. He weds a witch-journalist (Katherine Quinlan) but loves his fey girlfriend Pamela. And when he outrages the authorities with the threat of public exposure, the downward spiral starts that will only lead to death.

Stone certainly knew how to evoke the golden ages of rock'n'roll.
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Format: VHS Tape
While I acknowledge that Jim Morrison was an astounding musician and song writer and he was extremely self-destructive, seeing the account of it drawn out as long as it is in this movie is difficult to watch. Val Kilmer does a very good job in depicting the hard-living and personally obnoxious Morrison and many of the scenes capture the stage presence of Morrison when he was at his peak.
The music of “The Doors” is also amazing, there were no songs that were created in the sixties that are better than “Light My Fire” and “Riders on the Storm.” A professional musician once told me that the lead in to “Light My Fire” is the best one ever created.
Yet, this film suffers from the overkill of emphasis on the self-destructive path and periods of near psychosis of Morrison. While there was no doubt conflict within the group, there are very few scenes where they are productively working together. Which is unfortunate, because even with the short time they had together, they were incredibly creative. I often found it tedious to watch short periods of clear brilliance embedded in a sea of relentless alcohol, drug and tobacco use. I wanted to learn more about Morrison the artist and the Doors as a musical group, this movie is mistitled. It is almost totally about Morrison the self-destructive genius.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 19 2007
Format: DVD
Calling this movie "The Doors" is misleading. It would be more accurate to call it "Jim Morrison and Those Other Guys In the Band," since that is how it's presented.

It's always tempting to latch onto a rock legend in these rock biopics, and Oliver Stone clings like a limpet to the ghost of Jim Morrison. Acid-soaked scenery and mysticism are in every scene, but Stone seems content to wallow in the rock'n'roll debauchery rather than get into Morrison's head.

It opens with a voiceover of Jim Morrison's poetry, as we slowly fade into a stalled recording session. Then it flips back to 1949, as Morrison's family drives through the desert. The boy catches a glimpse of several Indians by the road -- and one of them dies as the family leaves.

Then it flips ahead to Morrison's (Val Kilmer) years at college -- he crashes a party for a pretty girl, makes arty films, acid-trips, and devotes himself to poetry. Then his pal Ray Manzarek (Kyle McLachlan) creates a rock band, with Morrison's poetry and voice as the centerpiece. Soon The Doors become a fixture in L.A. -- and then a famed band.

But as the Doors become more famous, Morrison increasingly loses himself in the messianic-Dionysian-rocker role that has been set out for him. He weds a witch-journalist (Katherine Quinlan) but loves his fey girlfriend Pamela (Meg Ryan). And when he outrages the authorities with the threat of public exposure, the spiral starts that will only lead to death.

Stone certainly knew how to evoke the golden ages of rock'n'roll. Lots of sex, kinetic concerts, and bizarre behavior where Morrison jumps up on platforms and screams, "I am the Lizard King! I can do anything!" The whole movie just kind of sweeps you off your feet.
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Format: DVD
When a young man by the name of Jim Morrison (Val Kilmer), who writes Poetry and Studying Film in the University of Los Angeles. When Jim falls in love with a beautiful young woman (Meg Ryan). But then, his life slowly changes, when he decide to quit film school to be a songwriter and singer with the help of his close friend (Klye MacLachlan). Jim and his friend, together, they form a band called "The Doors" with two another members (Frank Whaley and Kevin Dillon). Which "The Doors" becomes One of the Most Sensual and Exciting Figures in the History of Rock and Roll, especially the lead singer-Morrison from the Sixties. Which the legendary outlaw, who rocked America's Consciousness-forever.
Directed by Oliver Stone (Any Given Sunday, Born on the 4th of July, The Hand) made a fascinating drama that make Stone's One of his Best Films. Kilmer is Perfectly Cast as Jim Morrison. The Supporting Cast are Terrific, including:Kathleen Quinlan and Micheal Madson. Also Rock Singer:Billy Idol, Cult Star:Crispin Glover and Film Director:Stone appears in Cameos. DVD has an sharp non-anamorphic Widescreen (2.35:1) transfer and an digitally remastered-Dolby Digital 5.0 Surround Sound. This DVD is the Director appoved transfer for HD Televisions. DVD Feautres are only:Production Notes, Cast & Crew Bios and Theatrical Trailer. There's also a Special Edition DVD of this film also. This was a Box Office Disapointment and the only flaw in the film is Second Half, where the film slows down. The film is nicely photographed by Robert Richardson (JFK, Kill Bill Vol.1 & Vol.2, Natural Born Killers). Written by the Director:Stone and J.Randall Johnson. Panavision. Grade:A-.
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