CDN$ 14.60
  • List Price: CDN$ 20.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 5.40 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Dream & the Nightmare: The Sixties' Legacy to the Underclass Paperback – Apr 1 2000


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 14.60
CDN$ 8.06 CDN$ 0.01

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 238 pages
  • Publisher: Encounter Books; New edition edition (April 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1893554023
  • ISBN-13: 978-1893554023
  • Product Dimensions: 2.2 x 13.9 x 21.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 318 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #994,886 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Weren't dizzying contrasts of wealth and poverty supposed to have gone out with Dickensian London? Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By Andrew J. Stewart on Aug. 29 2001
Format: Paperback
Every American (and for that matter, anyone who might be affected by American policy) should read "The Dream and the Nightmare." I say this not because the book is brilliant--it isn't--but because our intellectually handicapped President read it (no mean feat for a man who hates reading as much as he does) and declared that it was second only to the Bible in importance. Bush's strategist, Karl Rove, describes "The Dream and the Nightmare" as a "road map" to Bush's political philosophy.
That would be great if Myron Magnet's book were something else, something perhaps beautiful and inspiring. Instead, it's an impassioned diatribe against society's poor and disadvantaged. Magnet seems sincere in his desire to help people, but his suggestions generally boil down to one thing: Stop showing compassion. Don't fix welfare--just end it. Don't help people with substance abuse problems; they don't deserve it. And then there's: Don't help the homeless. It is perhaps Magnet's most callous utterance of all; as he tells it, if you gave homeless people absolutely nowhere to go, they would suddenly cease to be homeless. (They would certainly cease to be visible, which I guess is the true intention.) To his credit, Magnet has a few constructive things to say. He offers a good proposal for how to reform the welfare system, and he convincingly endorses magnet schools as a more effective alternative to desegregation by busing. He also includes an informative analysis of the problems facing the mentally ill in our country, though it eventually works its way into his argument that some people merit compassion...and some people don't.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Feb. 5 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is part of a growing chorus of voices that are saying that not only are the hip and multicultural ideas garbage, but that they are quickly turning America into a third world country.
This book cuts through dumb ideas and tries to get us back to basics: functional families, responsibility for yourself, a work ethic -- this is the rather stringent prescription for an America that Magnet correctly describes as having run amok with bleeding heart liberalism and its dopey ideas of cheap sex, easy divorce, abortion on demand, and throwing money at the poor in the hopes that they will begin to function properly.
The book isn't elegantly written and there isn't any poetry in it, but this book sets the right prescription on the table. Read it if you want to get your head on straight.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Feb. 19 2003
Format: Paperback
Hearing that political guru Karl Rove gives a copy of this book to White House visitors, I decided to buy a copy and read it. I was disappointed to find an long winded diatribe, constantly whining about the Great Society, and blaming the social programs of the sixties for the problems of today. Mr Magnet misses the mark by several country miles.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
This is one of the books that President George W. Bush said helped him to understand the newed to substitute a culture of responsibility for the false ideas of liberation that grew out of the l960's counter culture. The author explains how liberal ideological constructs concerning work, mental illness, and education produced awful consequences for the poor. They did for the rich as well, but a wealthy single mother had far more options, he says, than her counterpart. Magnet skewers warm fictions about homelessness leading to crime, noting that criminal behavior usually comes first.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on Sept. 20 2002
Format: Paperback
I find there is good reason for concern and even a taint of fear as this intent to polarize the situation regarding America's underclass persists despite historical fact revealing the "true" reasons the world is what it is today. The rise of the nation-state and the profit-seeking joint-stock companies under mercantilism largely, but partially, describe the rise of the world we see today. I am not a liberal, but to pin the entire blame of America's underclass struggles on leftist ideology is to severely and overtly miss the mark by ignoring hard historical fact. This confirms individuals' tendency to expose themselves to that which confirms their beliefs. The subject must be viewed holistically and not from a narrow political critique for sound and honest conclusions to be drawn. This book fails to do so.
The "developing" world has been left with the burden of cleaning up the aftermath of colonialism and we dare say retribution and a sincere effort to lift those who were stepped on in the process is not necessary? Puerto Ricans and blacks, for example, never voluntarily chose to become part of America. Blacks were enslaved by the millions thus impoverishing their origins and we dare say we don't owe the black community anything? Blacks were officially marginalized in America. The intent to intellectually and inhumanely argue away the harm that has been done is to ignore the existence of the scar that has been left in American society and the ethnocentrism and racialism that dominates mainstream American culture that has stymied the life chances of the majority of the so-called "underclass.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback