The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies You... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 14.44
  • List Price: CDN$ 20.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 5.56 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future(Or, Don't Trust Anyone Under 30) Paperback – May 19 2009


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 14.44
CDN$ 5.49 CDN$ 0.13

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future(Or, Don't Trust Anyone Under 30) + The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement + Generation Me: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled--and More Miserable Than Ever Before
Price For All Three: CDN$ 42.59

Show availability and shipping details


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Tarcher (May 19 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585427128
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585427123
  • Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 15 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #91,122 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By grapemanca on Jan. 25 2010
Format: Paperback
The Dumbest Generation's central thesis is that the relatively new "Web 2.0" social technologies are creating an illiterate youth culture obsessed by triviality, pop culture and adolescent social life. It is an enjoyable pro-reading, anti-technology jeremiad in the tradition of Neil Postman (to whom Bauerlein pays homage), but it's not without its limitations.

Drawing on research from a number of government sources and reputable cultural institutions, Bauerlein's arguments can be both persuasive and problematic. For example, one of the best empirical studies he relies upon is a large-scale reading survey from the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts that measured leisure reading rates in 1982, 1992 and 2002. The rate (based on reading a single book outside of school or work) shows a precipitous drop of 17% in 18-24 year-olds (from 59.8% to 42.8%) between 1982 and 2002. This is certainly troubling, but Bauerlain glosses over the fact that leisure reading for 25-34 year-olds also declined (from 62.1% to 47.7%), as it did for 35-44 year-olds (from 59.7% to 46.6%). Moreover, this decline in leisure reading occurred BEFORE the wholesale adoption of the social computing technologies that Bauerlein believes is at the core of today's "dumbest generation". If anything, the best evidence he provides suggests that the big change in the 1970's - the spread of cable TV - has been the worst offender. [Speaking of out-of-date, one of the newest and biggest social networking fads, Facebook, is barely mentioned, whereas another service that has already receded, MySpace, features prominently in Bauerlein's analysis.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Angelo on Aug. 9 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am very impressed with this book. As a high school Physics and Mathematics teacher, I have noticed an alarming decline in fundamental skills and intellectual curiosity in my students over the last ten years. The rhetoric expounding that technology and the Web promotes "problem-solving" and "higher-order thinking" in students has only become more strident in the last decade -- unfortunately, these outcomes have proven to be an illusion, as clearly demonstrated by the results of many esteemed surveys and skill tests referenced in Bauerlein's book. My experiences in the classroom have proven to me that "problem-solving" and "higher-order thinking" cannot occur without a mastery of the fundamentals of the discipline, and now, after reading this book, I understand why my students are lacking these prerequisite skills.

While the Web is indeed an amazing resource for those of us with an interest in history, civics, the arts and the sciences, the Web does not create that intellectual curiosity in adolescents. In fact, the data referenced in this book proves that teenagers use technology almost exclusively as a social networking tool, and the time spent in peer interaction is taken from pursuits that would actually benefit the intellectual growth of our youth. Even Bill Joy, cofounder of Sun Microsystems, is skeptical of the learning potential of blogging and games: "It sounds like it's a lot of encapsulated entertainment... This ... sounds like a gigantic waste of time. If I was competing with the United States, I would love to have the students I'm competing with spending their time on this kind of crap." Perhaps this explains why more than 50% of the engineering doctorates granted by American universities go to foreign students.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By E. Lalonde on July 16 2009
Format: Paperback
First of all, I will state that I HAVE read this book and don't believe that people who haven't read or completed this book should be posting here or elsewhere.

Mark Bauerlein's "The Dumbest Generation" or "Don't trust anyone under 30" is well-researched and well presented book about how the digital revolution has, contrary to widely-held beliefs, made the Digital Generation less ambitious, bright and intelligent. The author is perhaps on to something when he says that The Digital Generation; referred to with various alternative names such as the digital natives, the Rising Generation, Generation X and Twixters are largely self-absorbed, illiterate and uncultured.

Much of the book centers on how the new generation has rejected reading whole-heartedly for other activities such as social networking, video games and creating personalized works of art. While the author recognizes that video games may improve hand-eye coordination, they do nothing to further one's reading skills or to learn mathematical formulas, nor learn the works of the Great Masters. He recognizes that there is a slew of literature on the internet, but how most people scan websites in an "F" fashion and don't really read the content and if there is content worth reading, it is written at a sixth or eighth grade level. His exhaustive research is clearly visible as he presents literally hundreds of other works on both sides of the argument. The Dumbest Generation is also betrayed by their mentors, who are teachers, guidance counselors and educators who teach them to be all they can be without the challenges, intellectual rigor and effort that comes with self discovery.

Still though, there are some criticisms.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback