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The End of Food: How the Food Industry Is Destroying Our Food Supply-And What You Can Do About It Paperback – May 18 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Greystone Books (May 18 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1553651693
  • ISBN-13: 978-1553651697
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.9 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 408 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #36,562 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

An issue-driven book that's newsworthy and shocking . . . —Quill and Quire

(2006-03-01)

. . . an issue-driven book that's newsworthy and shocking . . . —Bruce Gillespie, Quill & Quire

(2006-03-01)

A disturbing, well-documented look at the worldwide trend toward corporate food that may look good on a store shelf but that lacks all the qualities that make eating both a physical necessity and a sensual experience. —Quill and Quire

(2006-05-01)

. . . a disturbing, well-documented look at the worldwide trend toward corporate food that may look good on a store shelf but that lacks all the qualities that make eating both a physical necessity and a sensual experience. —Matthew Behrens, Quill & Quire

(2006-05-01)

Pawlick writes from a downright mainstream perspective . . . this is something hugely in its favour as his message about the food system will be heeded by more than the converted. —Vitality Magazine

(2006-06-01)

. . . Pawlick writes from a downright mainstream perspective . . . this is something hugely in its favour as his message about the food system will be heeded by more than the converted . . . —Paul Henderson, Vitality Magazine

(2006-06-01)

Pawlick is on a crusade to warn Canadians that the food industry has spent the last few decades engineering nutrition out of what ends up on the shelves of North America's supermarkets . . . Pawlick's book calls on consumers to turn to farmers' markets, backyard gardens and other means to find food that hasn't been nutritionally degraded. —The Observer

(2007-03-23)

Corporate profits trump health and nutrition in our modern food system, according to award-winning journalist and part-time farmer Thomas Pawlick in his expose of the food crisis in Canada's food supply. Pawlick gives guidance on how we can reclaim control of what we eat by becoming active at the local level. —Granville Magazine

(2009-01-23)

About the Author

Thomas F. Pawlick has more than thirty-five years of experience as a journalist and editor, specializing in science, environmental, and agricultural reporting. He is a three-time winner of the Canadian Science Writers' Association Award and received a National Magazine Award for his agricultural reporting. Pawlick holds a masters degree in farm journalism and is the author of ten books, including the best-selling The End of Food. He served six years as chief editor of Ceres magazine, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization's flagship publication. He currently lives on a 150-acre farm in eastern Ontario.


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THE TOMATO WAS THE LAST STRAW. Read the first page
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Most helpful customer reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By travel-biz-Asia-fun on June 21 2006
Format: Paperback
Very timely and well researched. Gives strong warnings on a basic issue. Must read. The only thing I want to add is that the problem is a global one, plus countless other problems, which happen especially in the poor nations. Especially for now, the industrial surge in nations like China and India poses great threats to global environment and eco balance in general. One other book offers sweeping views on China and other Asian nations: China's global reach: markets, multinationals, and globalization by a Chinese journalist George Zhibin Gu.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Alex on April 4 2008
Format: Paperback
Overall, I found the End of Food invaluable for understanding the influences that determine what ends up in our supermarkets. For example, according to Pawlick, the vast majority of tomatoes grown in North America are of varieties selected primarily for their yield, ease of harvest, and ability to survive transport rather than their flavor and nutritional value. I especially enjoyed the section describing the substantially lower nutritional value of today's supermarket food (like potatoes) versus that of 75 years ago.

This book also contains a few sections of what amounts to a laundry list of things that are in our food that shouldn't be (heavy metals, EDTA, feces, etc.) and touches on their harmful effects. I found this section useful as a starting point for further research. However, the list is so long that you could hardly expect a complete evaluation of each of the contaminants.

The last section of this book is a sort of "what you can do about it" section, which I found to have little novel information -- it basically says, buy organic, plant your own vegetables, learn where your food comes from, etc. Hardly groundbreaking stuff.

Despite a weak finish to the book (i never did finish the last section), I highly recommend this book to get a perspective on the nutritional quality of mass produced food (especially perishables like meat, dairy, vegetables, etc).

This book does _not_ focus on animal cruelty in the meat industry, pollution by factory farms, or bashing big business. All of those issues are certainly discussed but Pawlick seems to resist getting on a soap box and instead uses them mostly to describe why the food that is in our supermarket is the way it is.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Celeste L. on May 9 2011
Format: Paperback
I am aware of GMO foods more now that I have read this book.
I now buy 90% organic foods especially produce fruits and vegetables.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jessie Marc on Nov. 14 2007
Format: Paperback
I highly recommend this book, Pawlick's mix of scary facts, humor, and figurative language makes this book readable and important. My jaw dropped several times.
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful By I. Dobson on Jan. 15 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Generally a good review of the drop in nutritional value of our supermarket food but the author gets a bit carried away as the book progresses. Many of the sources are a bit rudimentary (e.g. introductory nutrition textbooks) and the author enters into a rather disjointed rant about environmental degradation, pollution and the evils of big business. To say that we should all switch to homegrown organic food may not be entirely realistic in todays world. From a personal perspective there is definitely "food for thought" here, but on a global scale it is be a bit simplistic. Still worth a read however for anyone interested in the current state of our food.
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