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The End of Poverty Paperback – Feb 28 2006


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The End of Poverty + The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good + Development as Freedom
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; 1 edition (Feb. 28 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0143036580
  • ISBN-13: 978-0143036586
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 13.7 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #18,163 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By J. Tobin Garrett TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 3 2009
Format: Paperback
Having a keen interest in international development and economics, I was excited to finally get a chance to read this book. Jeffrey Sachs is certainly a very intelligent guy, and this book is highly researched with exhaustive statistical back-up for many of the claims that he makes. Centrally, the claim that the poor are stuck in a poverty trap and require more aid in specific areas to get on the 'development ladder' (as Sachs puts it) and begin the climb up to a Western standard of living.

As I read through the book I found myself agreeing, nodding my head at parts, but then a growing frustration began to build as I kept reading, feeling as though he were leaving out some crucial detail. Perhaps it's because Sachs is mainly an economist (the book's subtitle is, after all, 'Economic possibilities for our time'), but I felt that the over reliance on charts, statistics and numbers left a gaping hole in the discussion of the effects of these aid packages on the ground. He talks about Bolivia, China, Russia, and India as developing nations and implementing free market policies and establishing things such as Free Trading Zones (areas where companies are exempt from national laws and taxes), but hardly goes into the effects of these on a population. Sachs main error is that he constantly charts the progress of a nation simply by its economic output, or GDP. But are the people happy? Is the culture flourishing? Are they working hard, producing money yes, but being exploited?

I became more and more frustrated and alienated from Sachs book as I read and the human aspect of the book became further and further out of reach.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kate Jongbloed on May 14 2008
Format: Paperback
I recently read Jeffery Sachs' The End of Poverty. I wasn't quite sure what to expect, but was excited to pick up at development best-seller- not a common combination! While I usually try to avoid non-fiction when I'm not at school or working, and tend to have a fiction addiction, I think TEOP will find its way onto my 2007 top ten list.

The book does a great job of summarizing most of my four year international development degree, from discussions of absolute versus relative poverty, to the best way to address the issues of environment, health, education and livelihoods in the developing world. And Sachs does it in a way that makes development concepts accessible: he looks at development as a ladder, and those facing extreme poverty have not been able to get their feet on even the first rung. Thus, the requirements of aid can be seen as inputs to help that group reach the bottom of the ladder and begin to work their way up. He also brings down the issues to a single number: $75billion dollars a year until 2025, at which point he believes that all human kind could be on the development ladder and extreme poverty would be eliminated. Hence, the End of Poverty!

Situated, as he is, in the heart of American development politics and economics, Sachs was also able to do a good job of explaining the successes and deficiencies of his country's aid contributions. Like the discussion in the previous post, this has helped to give me a more detailed view of America's role in the development world, which I find really interesting. He called on a number of American thinkers and activists to give power to his arguments for the potential of the end of extreme poverty.
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Format: Paperback
Its a social science book, for those it to clinical. Your reading a book written in a line with its research field. In my opion Sack's history has seen him shift beliefs and statements like the wind blows. Yet, I found this book to be well written and structured work. I think this book has many arguments in play and that grants the reader an opportunity to ether agree or develop a constructive critic. In any chase it gets you thinking. For myself I found the sections dedication to objectionable the western world views textile manufacturing that were moved to other nations; whilst the same people forget that not long ago in resent human history the same practice was conducted back home. And against the narrative some people hold that this textile manufacturing was purely exploitive. Sacks shows that these practices have historically different and sometimes long term social benefits.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Carolyn Gardner on June 20 2006
Format: Paperback
Economics is not exactly what I would consider a sexy subject to read about but I was hooked from the first sentence. Sachs delivers insightful information and concrete answers to some of the most important questions regarding the extreme poverty of countries such as Africa. It goes beyond the predjudices that prevail today and will open your eyes to see the truth. He doesn't just talk about what needs to be done, he shows us how to do it. If you truly want to understand why extreme poverty still exists in our 21st century of economic advancements, then this is the book for you. It will educate you and hopefully inspire you as it inspired me to realize that poverty truly can be erradicated by the year 2025.
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