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The Exorcist: The Version You've Never Seen


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The Exorcist: The Version You've Never Seen + The Shining: Two-Disc Special Edition / L'enfant lumière : Édition Spéciale (Bilingual) (1980)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Ellen Burstyn, Max von Sydow, Linda Blair, Lee J. Cobb, Kitty Winn
  • Directors: William Friedkin
  • Writers: William Peter Blatty
  • Producers: David Salven, Noel Marshall, William Peter Blatty
  • Format: AC-3, Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DVD-Video, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French, Portuguese
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Release Date: Dec 26 2000
  • Run Time: 132 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (408 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000524CY
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #9,178 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

The Exorcist (The Version You`V

Amazon.ca

Director William Friedkin was a hot ticket in Hollywood after the success of The French Connection, and he turned heads (in more ways than one) when he decided to make The Exorcist as his follow-up film. Adapted by William Peter Blatty from his controversial bestseller, this shocking 1973 thriller set an intense and often-copied milestone for screen terror with its unflinching depiction of a young girl (Linda Blair) who is possessed by an evil spirit. Jason Miller and Max von Sydow are perfectly cast as the priests who risk their sanity and their lives to administer the rites of demonic exorcism, and Ellen Burstyn plays Blair's mother, who can only stand by in horror as her daughter's body is wracked by satanic disfiguration. One of the most frightening films ever made, The Exorcist was mysteriously plagued by troubles during production, and the years have not diminished its capacity to disturb even the most stoical viewers. The film is presented in letterbox format on digital video disc, with a soundtrack that's guaranteed to curdle your blood. Don't say you weren't warned! --Jeff Shannon

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Steven Aldersley TOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 10 2011
Format: Blu-ray
The Exorcist BD
Cast: Ellen Burstyn, Linda Blair, Max von Sydow, Lee J. Cobb
Director: William Friedkin
Warner Brothers | 1973 | 132m and 122m | Rated R |

Video
VC-1 | 1080p | 1.78:1

Audio
English DTS-HD Master Audio 6.1
English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
French, German, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish: Dolby Digital Mono

Subtitles
English SDH, Arabic, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, Finnish, French, German SDH, Greek, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian SDH, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish

Discs
Two 50GB Blu-ray Discs
Digibook

The Exorcist's iconic cover claims that it's the scariest film of all time, but the makers of the movie prefer to label it as a theological thriller. I tend to agree and have always considered The Silence of the Lambs, The Shining and Psycho as psychological thrillers rather than horror. I mention those three because they represent the best that 'horror' has to offer, whether you label them as such or not.

If you have read my other reviews, you'll know by now that I'm a movie snob. When I think of horror films, the first thing that comes to mind is excessive gore and cheesy lines. I'm simply not a fan of seeing bodies hacked to pieces and I don't find any value in cheesy horror stories. So bear that in mind if you are a fan of such movies as the Evil Dead (not that there's anything wrong with that).

Instead, I look at how films are made, what they make me feel, the quality of the acting and the methods used by the director. In those terms, The Exorcist deserves to be rated among the best 'horror' films ever made.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alex on April 1 2004
Format: DVD
Society's need for devils, demons, and the grand pooh-bah of them all - Lucifer - enables individuals to explain many terrible things in society. It might be a perverted sense of security. In The Exorcist a demonically possessed 12 year old child (...) is still spooking audiences twenty-five years after the film's release. Universally, it is regarded as one of the scariest cult classics.
It's an intriguing film, but unlike most viewers, it made me giggle at times. Flashes of a pasty-faced, red-lipped, sharp-teethed "demon" looked like a frustrated French mime bitten by a rabid racoon during an unsuccessful truffle hunt. The film challenged me to reflect on a more central question - suppose there is no Satan? Experiments on children at Auschwitz become less explainable without a Luciferian figure. Stalin's artificial famine in Ukraine where parents killed and ate their children becomes more horrific without the "comfort" of blaming supernatural evil.
Of course an absence of the devil runs contrary to my denomination's simplistic understanding of the black and white world. Yet take away Satan and life becomes more cold, complicated, and may seem pointless at times. In a real, tangible way life actually becomes "scary" without the crutch of Satan. It is less understandable. Shades of gray take over.
The cinematographic technique using darkness is brilliant. The music is haunting and there are several unsettling scenes in the film that are chilling - the child's bed levitates, she develops grotesque sores suggesting physical decay, speaks in a husky male voice challenging the exorcist-priests (Jason Miller and Max von Sydow) to sexually violate her, and the spewing of a green, soupy like substance from her mouth onto the holy knights come to battle the devil.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By PJ on Nov. 7 2006
Format: DVD
Having seen the original release in 1973 (I was 15 years old at that time) in a huge movie theatre, nothing has scared me more. There were police vehicles parked outside the theatre which was indicative of the grip the movie had on some of the theatre goers.

If you cannot get the 25th anniversary version, then buy this one which has the best video/audio quality and contains a few new nasty surpises.
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Format: DVD
The all-time classic tale of demonic possession, based on William Peter Blatty's bestselling novel. Linda Blair is Regan MacNeil, a twelve-year-old girl who becomes manifested by a truly malevolent spirit. Her mother, Chris MacNeil (Ellen Burstyn), an agnostic, seeks out help from a young Jesuit psychiatrist, Father Damien Karras (Jason Miller, God rest his Irish soul!)who has demons of his own, and is tormented by the recent death of his mother, and his loss in the faith that he sought refuge in. After confronting the demon within the girl (and himself), Karras, although skeptical of demonic possession, is given permission by the church to assist during the exorcism. The priest selected to perform the ritual is a mysterious, elderly Jesuit, Father Lankaster Merrin (Max Von Sydow) who has seen such devilish work before. As the two clergymen face off against the demon, a police detective, Lt. William F. Kinderman (Lee J. Cobb) finds some links connecting the girl with a puzzling death and desecration in the local Catholic church.
William Friedkin brilliantly directed, and Blatty adapted the screenplay (receiving an Oscar for his efforts) and produced. The cast gives extraordinary, sensitive performances (Burstyn, Miller and Blair were all nominated for Academy Awards) and the special effects are breathtaking and still pack a punch, with veteran actress Mercedes McCambridge providing the voice of the evil entity. (The film also won for Best Achievement In Sound). The underlying theme of much of Blatty's work is evident, his philosophy being, if there's all this evil out there, why is there so much good? Metaphorically, everyone fights there own demons, and even in his last self-sacrificing moment, Karras finds his faith again and heroically gives his life to save this innocent child. How more meaningful can it be? A truly terrifying, engrossing and ultimately touching film dealing with faith and human frailty.
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