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The Eye [Import]


Price: CDN$ 65.17
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Product Details

  • Actors: Pierre Png, Lawrence Chou, Wilson Yip, Lee Sin-Je, Chutcha Rujinanon
  • Directors: Danny Pang, Oxide Pang Chun
  • Format: Color, Dolby, DVD-Video, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: Cantonese Chinese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Studio: Palm Pictures / Umvd
  • Release Date: Oct. 21 2003
  • Run Time: 98 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0009S54WC

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 24 2007
Format: DVD
For a blind person, it would seem like a dream come true to have their sight restored. But what if it came with a price? That is the idea behind the Pang Brothers' "The Eye" ("Jian gui"), one of the most minimalistic -- and chilling -- horror movies in years.

Wong Kar Mun (Angelica Lee) has been blind since she was two, but a cornea transplant restores her sight. At first she can only see blurry figures. But then, Mun sees shadowy phantoms leading away the spirits of the dead. Even worse, she sees the ghosts of suicides lingering on, doomed to repeat their deaths until they are put to rest.

Horrified by this, she goes to her psychotherapist Dr. Wah (Lawrence Chou) for help. Stretching professional ethics, the lovestruck doctor manages to get the records of the donor, and they go to see her family in a rural village. And guided by dreams and visions, Mun learns of the tragic life of a girl, Ling, who could foresee death...

If you like serial killers, buckets of blood and screaming blondes in your horror movies, don't watch "The Eye." As a horror movie, it will be too subtle, too quiet, and too full of intelligent questions about life and death.

There are only a couple of real "horror" moments in here, where things look grotesque. Most of the time, it's psychological in nature; at one point, we hear that suicides are doomed to repeat their deaths -- it's horrifying enough to contemplate someone killing themselves, but doing it over and over? Even worse, we see this in action.

And the Pang Bros. handle this wonderfully. Many of the ghosts appear and vanish quickly, giving a shock to the audience; at other times, they explore the changes that sight brings to Mun's life. But at the same time, the Bros.
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on April 22 2007
Format: DVD
For a blind person, it would seem like a dream come true to have their sight restored. But what if it came with a price? That is the idea behind the Pang Brothers' "The Eye" ("Jian gui"), one of the most minimalistic -- and chilling -- horror movies in years.

Wong Kar Mun (Angelica Lee) has been blind since she was two, but a cornea transplant restores her sight. At first she can only see blurry figures. But then, Mun sees shadowy phantoms leading away the spirits of the dead. Even worse, she sees the ghosts of suicides lingering on, doomed to repeat their deaths until they are put to rest.

Horrified by this, she goes to her psychotherapist Dr. Wah (Lawrence Chou) for help. Stretching professional ethics, the lovestruck doctor manages to get the records of the donor, and they go to see her family in a rural village. And guided by dreams and visions, Mun learns of the tragic life of a girl, Ling, who could foresee death...

If you like serial killers, buckets of blood and screaming blondes in your horror movies, don't watch "The Eye." As a horror movie, it will be too subtle, too quiet, and too full of intelligent questions about life and death.

There are only a couple of real "horror" moments in here, where things look grotesque. Most of the time, it's psychological in nature; at one point, we hear that suicides are doomed to repeat their deaths -- it's horrifying enough to contemplate someone killing themselves, but doing it over and over? Even worse, we see this in action.

And the Pang Bros. handle this wonderfully. Many of the ghosts appear and vanish quickly, giving a shock to the audience; at other times, they explore the changes that sight brings to Mun's life. But at the same time, the Bros.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Format: DVD
Mun (Angelica Lee) is a girl who has had the misfortune of being blind since the age of two. When she undergoes a cornea transplant to restore her sight, both she and her family are overjoyed at the chance for Mun to see again. When Mun begins to see odd shadows and vague, blurry images, it is difficult to discern at first whether or not this is a mere side effect of the surgery. Clearly, her eyes need time to readjust to their surroundings, and her brain time to accept and interpret this new information.
Once Mun leaves the hospital and arrives home, it becomes clear that something is terribly wrong. Her room constantly changes, and she not only sees, but also has conversations with the recently departed. Mun, traumatized by these images and living in a constant state of anxiety, retreats for a while back into the dark world she was familiar with for most of her life. After some coaxing from her therapist, Dr. Wah, (Lawrence Chou), who eventually believes that there is more to her story than meets the eye (no pun intended), Mun realizes that she needs to face her fears and this new way of life. Of course, the fact that Mun's therapist sees her as something more than a mere patient only serves to help Mun's cause. Together the two set out to understand these images and their meanings. Does Mun only perceive things differently due to the fact that her "visual vocabulary" is under-developed? Or has she inherited an unexpected "gift" from her cornea donor?
"The Eye" is everything a suspenseful horror/thriller movie should be. Though this film, at many times, highly resembles "The Sixth Sense," the Pang brothers have managed to put their own unique twist on the story.
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