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The Eyes of the Skin: Architecture and the Senses Paperback – Jun 20 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Academy Press; 2 edition (June 20 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470015780
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470015780
  • Product Dimensions: 14.9 x 0.6 x 20.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 141 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #367,925 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Architecture has the capacity to be inspiring, engaging and life-enhancing. But why is it that architectural schemes which look good on the drawing board or the computer screen can be so disappointing ‘in the flesh’?

The answer, argues Juhani Pallasmaa, lies in the dominance of the visual realm in today’s technological and consumer culture, which has pervaded architectural practice and education. Whilst our experience of the world is formulated by a combination of five senses, much architecture is produced under consideration of only one – sight. The suppression of the other sensory realms has led to an impoverishment of our environment, causing a feeling of detachment and alienation.

First published in 1996, The Eyes of the Skin has become a classic of architectural theory and is required reading on courses in schools of architecture around the world. It consists of two extended essays. The first surveys the historical development of the ocularcentric paradigm in western culture since the Greeks, and its impact on the experience of the world and the nature of architecture. The second examines the role of the other senses in authentic architectural experiences, and points the way towards a multi-sensory architecture which facilitates a sense of belonging and integration.

Since the book’s first publication, interest in the role of the body and the senses has been emerging in both architectural philosophy and teaching. This new, revised and extended edition of this seminal work will not only inspire architects and students to design more holistic architecture, but will enrich the general reader’s perception of the world around them.

‘Not since the Danish architect Steen Eiler Rasmussen’s Experiencing Architecture (1959) has there been such a succinct and clear text which could serve students and architects at this critical time in the development of 21st-century architecture.’ Steven Holl

About the Author

JUHANI PALLASMAA is one of Finland’s most distinguished architects and architectural theorists. In all aspects of his theoretical and design practice – which includes architecture, graphic design, urban planning and exhibitions – he places a consistent emphasis on the importance of identity, sensorial experience and tactility.

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Format: Paperback
Pallasmaa's arguement for a less ocularcentric architecture is a valid and important one, especially when the design process is continually being reduced to staring at a screen and clicking a mouse. Since architecture is experienced by more than just the eyes, the other senses: sound, touch--and even smell and taste--could and should be involved in the design process. Pallasmaa's prose is accessible, inspiring, and requires only an afternoon to read. "The Eyes of the Skin" should be considered one of the important architectural texts for the contemporary age.
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By P.vera on March 10 2009
Format: Paperback
This book has the sense of architecture itself, creates a path between knowledge, analysis and human feelings which are the reflexions of any architectural space. It is a must for contemporary design professionals.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 15 reviews
37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
what has been lost in architecture and why it should be back June 4 2006
By Explaining Architecture - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
During my 15 years of architectural education and some years of practice (both as architect and as 'explainer' of architecture) I have not yet encountered a book on architecture which has changed my view on architecture so dramatically.

Juhani Pallasmaa's book makes an excelent argument for retrieving in architecture that which seems to have been lost for a long time: the lived intelligence of the bodilly senses. In his book Pallasmaa gives an overview of the development of the occularcentrism which is dominating architecture (and pretty much every cultural aspect) in the Western world for centuries and goes on to show how this leads to an impoverment of the architectural experience (and with that the impoverment of our daily lifes).

The mix of theory, practice and convincing examples (ranging from architecture, art, cinema to literature and poetry together with the size (80 pages) makes the book easily readable, even for the less theoretical inclined reader. My advice: read it!

For those of you who are as impressed with this book as I am: there's another book by Pallasmaa with the title 'Encounters'(published by Rakennustieto Oy Rati, June 2005). This book features a collection of essay's which were written by the author over the last 20 years. This book is also about the phenomenology of architecture but, due to its size (app. 350 pages), gives a broader overview of the thinking and writing of Juhani Pallasmaa. It seems it is not available at Amazon but I hope they will put is on there list soon!
24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
Updated Reprint of an Old Classic Sept. 23 2005
By John Matlock - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Now back in print and updated into a second edition, this little book is a masterpiece on the differences between what we see in a set of architectural plans compared with what we sense when we walk into a building.

When we actually walk into a building, we are sensing the building with all of our senses. The smell of the still drying paint, the echo's from unexpected sources and more now have an impact that wasn't there in the plans.

This book consists of two essays:

The first surveys the historical development of the eye-centric orientation of our Western culture that began with the Greeks.

The second begins to lay out a way towards a multi-sensory approach to architecture that forms a sense of belonging and integration.
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Lessons for students in architecture June 19 2000
By Leon Gouws - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As a student in architecture I would recommend this book to any person involved in any way of design. Not only buildings, because architecture also includes every aspect of the designing of space. This can therefore include industrial design, automotive design, etc. The book dicusses the interaction between people and spaces(buildings) using the human senses as medium - the way we see, feel, hear and experience a space. It is a fresh and captivating book and it is a real pitty that it is out of print.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Not exactly what it seems Aug. 1 2008
By Chris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book has excellent intentions and addresses a very important and neglected issue in architecture. The topic discusses the predominance of mind/visual based designs that end up being projects of artistic self expressions on the part of its sponsors. The author challenges
this bias to make us aware that buildings also need to relate to us not only visually to also all of our human senses. The writing is clear and simple but still academic in flavor. While this is a much needed message I gave only 3 stars because of the following observation. I thought the overall concept was excellent but I did not think the application of the concept was very successful once I looked at the work of the architects being referenced. The author quotes many architects whose work he believes touches all of our senses and are therefore assumed to be less visual and cerebral. My reaction was these architects are doing non-cerebral but from an intellectual place. As a result while their buildings are richer and more interesting to our senses they are nevertheless still very conceptual and dissociative. In other words we still end up with designs that while promoting a fuller sensory experience are still very mental. For me that's the weakness with this book at least based on the specific architects referenced.
A Refreshing Perspective Aug. 31 2010
By John - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I have just finished this book in conjunction with a seminar I am taking on Sensory Design as I work towards my Master of Architecture degree. The book impressed me in several ways, but was most impactful in that it reinforces several ideas that I believe to be intuitively linked to architecture and architectural expression.

Most importantly, Pallasmaa's discussions of ocularcentrism and its growing dominance in the architecture of the Western World sheds light on a growing (and potentially limiting) phenomenon - that architecture is executed with its visual sense as the focal point for design, rather than for the environmental experience that it can create. His essays explore the fundamental necessity for architecture to facilitate and trigger experiences that affect all of the senses.

Pallasmaa's argument is layed out very coherently in two essays. The first discusses visual dominance as a potential limiting factor in contemporary design, while the second makes a case for each sense and its crucial importance in consideration to overall contemporary design.

What we have here, in the end, is a highly theoretical text that firmly states Pallasmaa's arguements and validates them with discussions of artistic and archtiectural principles. Overall, the book makes a strong case for the necessity to design for all senses in architecture, and is a launching point for further discussion and critical introspective thinking.


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