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The Fog of War (Sous-titres français)


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The Fog of War (Sous-titres français) + Inside Job (Sous-titres français) + The Corporation (Widescreen Edition)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Robert McNamara, John F. Kennedy, Fidel Castro, Richard Nixon, Barry Goldwater
  • Directors: Errol Morris
  • Producers: Errol Morris, Adam Kosberg, Ann Petrone, Frank Scherma, Jack Lechner
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, DVD-Video, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish, French, Portuguese, Japanese
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Ages 14 and over
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • Release Date: May 11 2004
  • Run Time: 95 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (74 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0001L3LUE

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ashley Allinson on March 8 2005
Format: DVD
I thought Capturing the Friedman's should have won the Best Documentary Oscar until I saw Fog of War. If you are thinking about staying home this weekend and want to watch a film that gets you thinking, then Errol Morris' Fog of War is your best bet. Winner of the 2003 Academy Award for best Documentary Feature, Fog of War documents Robert McNamara, U.S. Secretary of State under Kennedy and Johnson, and his recollection of everything from his tenure as President of Ford Motors, to his involvement, as an advisor, in the foreign policy and subsequent standoff of the Cuban Missile Crisis.
Fog of War uses archival and interview footage with McNamara to explain the eleven lessons he learned from his time working as Secretary of State. His political savvy is captured onscreen as he brings the viewers up to speed on some of the historical decisions he helped foster, the results to which saw him become the President of the World Bank.
Fog of War acts as a reminder of the importance of past political decisions in a more comprehensive and constructive way thank Michael Moore is capable of.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ian Gordon Malcomson HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on July 6 2009
Format: DVD
I found Errol Morris's documentary study of the life of Robert McNamara, former Defense Secretary in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations during the 60s to be both enlightening and sobering. After watching this very revealing portrayal of how and why McNamara, one of the brightest corporate minds in America during the 50s, involved America in a 'hot war' in the midst of the Cold War, I come away a tad more appreciative of what it means to lead in war. As he takes his audience through his rendition of events, there is a strong sense that McNamara is telling the truth as to his limited successes and his ultimate failures. None of the answers he gave in response to Morris's off-stage questions were glib, vacuous, or defensive. There is a lot to be said for putting a mike in front of a prominent public figure like McNamara, one of the chief architects of the Vietnam War, and letting him tell the world his version of events. Morris includes a lot useful archival material that helps illustrate the magnitude of both the Cuban Missile Crisis and the Vietnam War. War, as part of the human condition, according to McNamara, is something that is so complex that the prospects of victory will always be somewhat diminished by by the lingering fears of defeat. In Sun Tzu fashion, McNamara turns this film into one of those teachable moments in history when he tells his audience the hard lessons he has learned from being a front-line operator in one of the world's most enigmatic conflicts. In hindsight he tells people that going to war with the greatest sense of purpose and rationale guarantees nothing if it ignores critical data, fails to empathize with the enemy, lacks a coordinated plan of attack, and refuses to adjust to new exigencies.Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. B. Alcat TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Jan. 8 2007
Format: DVD
"The Fog of War" is an excellent documentary directed by Errol Morris, and based on several interviews that Morris made to Robert McNamara. In my opinion, this is a documentary that everybody should see for its educational value. Despite that, please don't be scared: it is also very engaging, and consequently it is unlikely you will be able to turn it off once you have started to watch it.

Far from being a film that glorifies McNamara, this is a documentary in which the former Secretary of Defense in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations expresses his opinions sincerely, and privileges the facts even if they don't always make him look well. Moreover, "The Fog of War" includes visual and audio footage of historical value that backs up many of the things that McNamara points out, and that will be of interest to those who would like to learn more about Mr. McNamara, but also about American history.

At the time in which this documentary was filmed, Robert McNamara was 85 years old, and said that he was at a point in his life where he could look back and draw some conclusions regarding what he did in the past. Needless to say, the spectator will be grateful to be allowed to hear his opinions about his life, and the events that he participated in. McNamara lived during the Cold ("Cold War... Hell, it was a hot war"), and went through the Cuban Missile Crisis and Vietnam, among other things. He was a professor, worked in the military, as president of Ford and as Secretary of Defense during the Vietnam War. McNamara didn't led a boring life, and he tried to take advantage of his experiences ("My mission in life is to understand") in order not to make the same mistake too many times.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Jacobs on July 16 2004
Format: DVD
In his own words Robert Strange McNamara tells of his early life and his career, notably his service as Secretary of Defense under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson. Through his narrative, viewers obtain a unique retrospective on critical international events, including the Cuban Missile Crisis, the bombing of Japan and the Vietnam War.
McNamara sticks to the history. His personality is revealed by the way he speaks about events he found moving, but he dodges the tough personal questions, such as those about his family, his responsibility and his sense of guilt.
Clearly a reflective man, the lessons he provides are worthy of consideration by all, not just government leaders. In seeing some of the same mistakes made in current foreign relations as those McNamara recounts, viewers recognize the cycle of history, and human falliability.
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