Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Gene Illusion Paperback – Jan 1 2003


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 55.89 CDN$ 55.86

Join Amazon Student in Canada


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 348 pages
  • Publisher: PCCS Books (January 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1898059470
  • ISBN-13: 978-1898059479
  • Product Dimensions: 23 x 15.6 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 558 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,013,716 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
In 1925 psychiatrist Abraham Myerson, who was writing at the height of the eugenics movement's influence the belief in the overriding importance of genes, observed, 'We often hear of hereditary talents, hereditary vices, and hereditary virtues, but whoever will critically examine the evidence will find that we have no proof of their existence. Read the first page
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Pick up virtually any text book on psychiatry or abnormal psychology, and you're sure to find confident assertions that schizophrenia has a "strong genetic component." Twin studies and adoption studies will be claimed to provide clear scientific evidence of this.
Jay Joseph has done something the authors of most such text books have not - he's actually looked at the studies themselves. His own book is detailed, comprehensive and scholarly - and when he holds these studies up to the light, most of their authors' confident conclusions virtually crumble. At the very least, Joseph shows how speculative and shakily supported these conclusions are. But I think Joseph establishes more: if the twin and adoption studies stand for anything, they show how overwhelmingly important environment and experience are in schizophrenia.
This book is not light reading. But it methodically puts biopsychiatry to the test. And, as so often in its history, biopsychiatry does not fare well when looked at too closely.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
shooting down decades of biopsychiatry's puffery March 10 2004
By Peter C. Dwyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Pick up virtually any text book on psychiatry or abnormal psychology, and you're sure to find confident assertions that schizophrenia has a "strong genetic component." Twin studies and adoption studies will be claimed to provide clear scientific evidence of this.
Jay Joseph has done something the authors of most such text books have not - he's actually looked at the studies themselves. His own book is detailed, comprehensive and scholarly - and when he holds these studies up to the light, most of their authors' confident conclusions virtually crumble. At the very least, Joseph shows how speculative and shakily supported these conclusions are. But I think Joseph establishes more: if the twin and adoption studies stand for anything, they show how overwhelmingly important environment and experience are in schizophrenia.
This book is not light reading. But it methodically puts biopsychiatry to the test. And, as so often in its history, biopsychiatry does not fare well when looked at too closely.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback