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The George Grant Reader [Paperback]

George Grant , William Christian , Sheila Grant
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 41.95
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Book Description

Feb. 21 1998 Philosophy and Theology

Called the most forceful voice of philosophic radicalism that Canada has so far produced, George Grant was a prolific writer, engaged by subjects ranging from Canadian politics to ancient philosophy. The George Grant Reader is the first book to bring together in one volume a comprehensive selection of his work, allowing readers to sample the whole range of his interests.

The reader includes selections from all phases of Grant's career, beginning with The Empire: Yes or No? (1945) and ending with an article on Heidegger, left unfinished at the time of his death in 1988. Forty-six essays, grouped into six sections, encompass his views on politics, morality, philosophy, education, technology, faith, and love. Also featured are Grant's writings on those who most influenced his thought, ranging from St Augustine to Karl Marx and Simone Weil. A number of his more disturbing essays are also included such as his controversial writings on abortion. The editors' substantial introduction places the articles in the wider context of Grant's life and thought.

This long-overdue collection contains classic works, little-known masterpieces, and previously unpublished material. The volume is an ideal starting point for those who have never read Grant as well as an indispensable reference for Grant specialists.


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Product Description

About the Author

William Christian is Professor of Political Science at the University of Guelph. He is author of George Grant: A Biography and editor of George Grant: Selected Letters, both published by the University of Toronto Press.



Sheila Grant was married to George Grant for 41 years and is a graduate in English Language and Literature from Oxford University.

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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mysterious absence of Plato's Thought in... Dec 29 1998
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Here we go again. TAKE 2. I liked the book a lot; however, I think the worst aspect of the book is the absence of direct comment, by Grant, on Plato's works and in particular, 'The Republic'. Grant makes several references to friend, Professor James Doull, and writers, Simone Weil, Leo Strauss, who aided him in his understanding of Plato and Socrates. Obviously, Christianity also gave Grant perspective on the pagan philosophers; nevertheless, the careful reader cannot help but feel cheated by the lack of direct comment on the 'Republic' in particular. If Doull 'taught' Grant how to read the central books of the 'Republic', I wish he would have shared it. I humbly think Book V of the 'Republic' is the republic. You understand Book V, you began to catch a glimpse of Socratic philosophy before Plato, before the Athenian law court acted. That's my only complaint. I think the reader shows well how Grant was influenced by Heidegger, Simone Weil, Leo Strauss and others. The political essays are worth reading for anyone with an interest in Canadian history, and the abortion essays, although I do not agree with them, are intellectually and morally honest expressions of genuine thoughtful concern.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Still Waiting for Grant's Collected Works Dec 19 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
George Parkin Grant was Canada's leading political philosopher this century. A so-called "red tory," he was a critic both of statism and the market, a position almost unknown in the United States. He was above all a critic of modernity, of modern Western man's technological "fate." He deserves to be much more widely read. Unfortunately, this volume is marred by too much editorial intervention. Grant wrote with extreme economy, and his prose style is positively noble, yet time and again the editors cut and chop his essays while inserting lengthy editorial introductions. I am thus still waiting for someone, anyone, to publish a complete edition of Grant's Collected Works.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
The worst aspect of this reader is it's inability to show what Grant thought about the 'core books' of Plato's Republic. In several essays Grant makes mention of how indebted he is to Dalhousie Professor James Doull for 'teaching' hm to read the Republic's central books.Which books? Book 5? Book 4,5,6, and 7. Moreover, the material on Plato in the 'Thinking Their Thoughts' section is wholley inadequate in giving the reader much incite into Christian's claim that Grant was deeply affected by Plato's writings. How so? It's obvivious Grant admired Heidegger and it is shown why. Regretably this failure doesn't mortally wound the overall work.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Still Waiting for Grant's Collected Works Dec 19 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
George Parkin Grant was Canada's leading political philosopher this century. A so-called "red tory," he was a critic both of statism and the market, a position almost unknown in the United States. He was above all a critic of modernity, of modern Western man's technological "fate." He deserves to be much more widely read. Unfortunately, this volume is marred by too much editorial intervention. Grant wrote with extreme economy, and his prose style is positively noble, yet time and again the editors cut and chop his essays while inserting lengthy editorial introductions. I am thus still waiting for someone, anyone, to publish a complete edition of Grant's Collected Works.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mysterious absence of Plato's Thought in... Dec 29 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Here we go again. TAKE 2. I liked the book a lot; however, I think the worst aspect of the book is the absence of direct comment, by Grant, on Plato's works and in particular, 'The Republic'. Grant makes several references to friend, Professor James Doull, and writers, Simone Weil, Leo Strauss, who aided him in his understanding of Plato and Socrates. Obviously, Christianity also gave Grant perspective on the pagan philosophers; nevertheless, the careful reader cannot help but feel cheated by the lack of direct comment on the 'Republic' in particular. If Doull 'taught' Grant how to read the central books of the 'Republic', I wish he would have shared it. I humbly think Book V of the 'Republic' is the republic. You understand Book V, you began to catch a glimpse of Socratic philosophy before Plato, before the Athenian law court acted. That's my only complaint. I think the reader shows well how Grant was influenced by Heidegger, Simone Weil, Leo Strauss and others. The political essays are worth reading for anyone with an interest in Canadian history, and the abortion essays, although I do not agree with them, are intellectually and morally honest expressions of genuine thoughtful concern.
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mysterious Absence of Plato's Thinking in ... Dec 8 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The worst aspect of this reader is it's inability to show what Grant thought about the 'core books' of Plato's Republic. In several essays Grant makes mention of how indebted he is to Dalhousie Professor James Doull for 'teaching' hm to read the Republic's central books.Which books? Book 5? Book 4,5,6, and 7. Moreover, the material on Plato in the 'Thinking Their Thoughts' section is wholley inadequate in giving the reader much incite into Christian's claim that Grant was deeply affected by Plato's writings. How so? It's obvivious Grant admired Heidegger and it is shown why. Regretably this failure doesn't mortally wound the overall work.
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