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The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo / Millénium : Les Hommes qui n'aimaient pas les femmés (Bilingual) [Blu-ray] (Sous-titres français)

4.1 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

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  • The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo / Millénium : Les Hommes qui n'aimaient pas les femmés (Bilingual) [Blu-ray] (Sous-titres français)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Rooney Mara, Daniel Craig
  • Format: Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Ages 18 and over
  • MPAA Rating: PG
  • Studio: Columbia/Tristar Video
  • Release Date: March 20 2012
  • Run Time: 158 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B006Z4LPDQ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #11,832 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Product Description

Product Description

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo / Mill?nium : Les

Amazon.ca

A murder mystery rife with suspense, scandal, sexual abuse, and some supremely intriguing characters, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is an excellently crafted film adaptation of Stieg Larsson's equally fascinating book of the same name. Larsson's book was also the basis of a 2009 Swedish film (also with the same title), and while the Swedish film was good, this American version is far superior, thanks to fantastic cinematography and livelier pacing that results in a constant, electric tension that drives every second of the movie. The breathtaking footage of a snowy, remote island in Sweden thoroughly exudes bitter cold, and the attention to the smallest details, like the whistling of the wind through a door left ajar, makes the hairs on the back of viewers' necks absolutely prickle. Like the book, the film is long (158 minutes), there's an abundance of dialogue that is never awkward and always efficient, and there are plenty of false endings. The suspense and the intricacy of the mystery are stellar, and even viewers who know the story well will find themselves sucked into the riddle being investigated by journalist Mikael Blomkvist (Daniel Craig). The casting is great, as are the performances of all the key actors, but by far the best thing about this film is Rooney Mara, who is utterly believable as the incredibly strong, extremely disturbed Lisbeth Salander, Blomkvist's unlikely assistant. Mara's performance is chillingly real and completely riveting. Yorick van Wageningen is perfectly despicable as Nils Bjurman (though his scene with Salander is sure to prove highly disturbing to some viewers), Christopher Plummer is an effective Henrik Vanger, and Stellen Skarsgård is eerily frightening as Martin Vanger. Viewers can only hope that director David Fincher, screenplay writer Steven Zaillian, and actors Craig and Mara will continue their collaboration to produce films based on the final two books of Larsson's Millennium trilogy. --Tami Horiuchi

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Inkhorn HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 28 2012
Format: DVD
A disgraced financial journalist, and a young antisocial computer hacker join forces to solve the 40 year old mystery of a teenage girl's disappearance. As they do so, they get drawn into serious crime and corruption, deadly family secrets, and a string of unsolved murders of young women spanning fifty years, which puts their own lives at unbelievable risk. Will they solve the mystery before they become history?

When I saw the original movie series about two years ago, I was awestruck by mostly the awesome acting of Noomi rapace, and the movie's visual style, and it's inherent raunchiness, which is more common in stylish European thrillers than slick Hollywood movies. When I heard there would be an English version, I thought this would be a hard act to follow, and without Noomi Rapace as the female lead would not be the same, because she was so much an integral element of the original movies success.

In the meantime I listened to the audiobook version featuring Simon Vance, which I also found quite enjoyable. He does all the voices including Lisbeth with a slight Swedish accent that veers toward cockney. The story is much more detailed with many elements glossed over or left out of the original movie.

So, when I heard it was about to be released, and saw the trailer, and understood the pedigree behind this movie with David Fincher directing, and Daniel Craig as Blomquist, I made a point of going to the evening show before its official opening today.

Inevitably, one cannot help but compare with the previous experience. Definitely, the fact that this is in English is the greatest justification for the remake, so for many people who are distracted by subtitles this will automatically be a better experience.
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Format: Blu-ray
David Fincher is one of the less commercial directors in recent years. Even though he has a style all his own, themes he visits often and actors he uses time and again. After Social Network, he was approached to direct the remake for the popular phenomenon that is Stieg Larsson's The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Rooney Mara, an up and coming actress who was given a small role in Social Network, truly gave a heart-breaking performance with her take on the Lisbeth Salander character. I have yet to watch the original Swedish movies, but Mara's transformation from Social Network to Dragon Tattoo was nothing less than a shock. These two women couldn't be further apart from each other and that is what I believe makes a great actress.

Dragon Tattoo deals with a lot of hard themes: it's violent, dark, repulsive, hypocrit, and many other things. It is a portrait of our 21st Century society at its best. Believe me when I say this adaptation is NOT for the faint of hearts. Myself, I almost gave up during a particular scene because I couldn't bare what I saw shown, forced to watch. Fincher doesn't screw around and uses his skills as a storyteller to sympathize with Lisbeth as she follows her slow and steady descent into Hell... until she meets Mikael Blomkvist, a down on his luck journalist who got his reputation tarnished. These two imperfect and broken souls meet and work on a 40 year-old unresolved case.

I'm not going to say more about the plot. I will say this though: if David Fincher wanted to grab me, his introduction credits and "The Immigrant" song remix truly mesmerized me... mislead me, would be another way to see it, for this very James Bond-ish beginning is as far as the rest of the film could be...
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By Inkhorn HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Dec 21 2011
A disgraced financial journalist, and a young antisocial computer hacker join forces to solve the 40 year old mystery of a teenage girl's disappearance. As they do so, they get drawn into serious crime and corruption, deadly family secrets, and a string of unsolved murders of young women spanning fifty years, which puts their own lives at unbelievable risk. Will they solve the mystery before they become history?

When I saw the original movie series about two years ago, I was awestruck by mostly the awesome acting of Noomi rapace, and the movie's visual style, and it's inherent raunchiness, which is more common in stylish European thrillers than slick Hollywood movies. When I heard there would be an English version, I thought this would be a hard act to follow, and without Noomi Rapace as the female lead would not be the same, because she was so much an integral element of the original movies success.

In the meantime I listened to the audiobook version featuring Simon Vance, which I also found quite enjoyable. He does all the voices including Lisbeth with a slight Swedish accent that veers toward cockney. The story is much more detailed with many elements glossed over or left out of the original movie.

So, when I heard it was about to be released, and saw the trailer, and understood the pedigree behind this movie with David Fincher directing, and Daniel Craig as Blomquist, I made a point of going to the evening show before its official opening today.

Inevitably, one cannot help but compare with the previous experience. Definitely, the fact that this is in English is the greatest justification for the remake, so for many people who are distracted by subtitles this will automatically be a better experience.
Read more ›
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