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The Giver Mass Market Paperback – Sep 10 2002

4.3 out of 5 stars 2,288 customer reviews

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Mass Market Paperback, Sep 10 2002
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Laurel Leaf; Reprint edition (Sept. 10 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440237688
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440237686
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 1.4 x 17.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 91 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 2,288 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #62,632 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

From Amazon

In a world with no poverty, no crime, no sickness and no unemployment, and where every family is happy, 12-year-old Jonas is chosen to be the community's Receiver of Memories. Under the tutelage of the Elders and an old man known as the Giver, he discovers the disturbing truth about his utopian world and struggles against the weight of its hypocrisy. With echoes of Brave New World, in this 1994 Newbery Medal winner, Lowry examines the idea that people might freely choose to give up their humanity in order to create a more stable society. Gradually Jonas learns just how costly this ordered and pain-free society can be, and boldly decides he cannot pay the price. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

In the "ideal" world into which Jonas was born, everybody has sensibly agreed that well-matched married couples will raise exactly two offspring, one boy and one girl. These children's adolescent sexual impulses will be stifled with specially prescribed drugs; at age 12 they will receive an appropriate career assignment, sensibly chosen by the community's Elders. This is a world in which the old live in group homes and are "released"--to great celebration--at the proper time; the few infants who do not develop according to schedule are also "released," but with no fanfare. Lowry's development of this civilization is so deft that her readers, like the community's citizens, will be easily seduced by the chimera of this ordered, pain-free society. Until the time that Jonah begins training for his job assignment--the rigorous and prestigious position of Receiver of Memory--he, too, is a complacent model citizen. But as his near-mystical training progresses, and he is weighed down and enriched with society's collective memories of a world as stimulating as it was flawed, Jonas grows increasingly aware of the hypocrisy that rules his world. With a storyline that hints at Christian allegory and an eerie futuristic setting, this intriguing novel calls to mind John Christopher's Tripods trilogy and Hans Christian Andersen's The Little Match Girl. Lowry is once again in top form--raising many questions while answering few, and unwinding a tale fit for the most adventurous readers. Ages 12-14.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Elmo on Oct. 19 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
My class, Scott Bateman Middle School in The Pas, read this book and we thought it was great! It's very different compared to some of the books I have read. I recommend it if you want a book that is kinda like a fantasy book. However, I thought that it should of continued because it seemed like the book didn't end.
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Format: Paperback
I never got to read this book in grade eight like some of my school mates. We were all divided into small groups and each group got their own book to read together. The Giver by Lois Lowry was one of those books, but unfortunately it was not mine. I've wanted to read it ever since, and seeing the trailer for the soon-to-be movie prompted me to finally read it.

I finished it this morning, and I can honestly say I loved and wish that I could have read it when I was younger. Would I have understood the deeper meaning? Probably not at first, but I would have loved to have been a part of that classroom discussion. As much as I wish I had read it when I was younger, I am also glad I read for the first time as a 22 year old adult. I think I have a better understanding of some of the themes and I am definitely mature enough for some of the more "disturbing" themes. Had I read it as a 12 year old, I'm not sure if it would have turned me off or not.

All in all, this book is definitely worth a read. It's a quick read that won't take long at all, but does require you to think. I am looking forward to the movie!
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 11 2015
Format: Paperback
Dystopian teen fiction is pretty hot right now, with blockbusters like "The Hunger Games" and "Divergent." But the grandaddy of them all was "The Giver."

And long before it became chic, Lois Lowry produced a hauntingly memorable story set in a world where emotions are suppressed, and only "The Giver" has the power to change it. It's a powerful little story -- whether read alone or with the three loose sequels -- with haunting prose and some very strong characters, as well as a message of compassion and acceptance.

A young boy named Jonas lives in a rigid, joyless community where people use emotion-deprivation pills and adhere to insanely strict rules -- they have no conflict, poverty or discrimination... but they also have no love, no fun, and no creativity. When Jonas is selected as the Receiver of Memories, he is suddenly flooded with feelings and memories of both the good and the bad from humanity's distant past.

And as he comes to realize what his people have lost in their quest to be the same, Jonas begins yearning for the world he knows must exist outside the Community. But his quest becomes a more personal one when he discovers another price for the Community's existence: the "release" of babies that they don't deem good enough. The only one who can change the Community is Jonas.

Pretty much all young-adult dystopian fiction owes a debt to the Giver Quartet -- it has young people discovering the cruelty and callousness of their societies, and finding different ways to rebel. But Lowry doesn't shy away from asking the serious questions in her story, such as lack of respect for life (if it's inconvenient or doesn't fit in), kindness, compassion, and the good AND bad roots of what it means to truly live.
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Format: Paperback
The Giver by Lois Lowry is a very opinionated book. Different people will think different things about the book and I think there are too many choices to make at the end of the story. In The Giver, a child named Jonas is getting his new 'assignment' for his life and he just happens to get the 'Receiver of Memory'. He then must receive memories of things that other people in the community do not know.
In the Giver, Lowry tried to make some sort of Utopia (Perfect World) and wanted to show that this would probably never happen and that this world might be perfect but there are still some flaws in it. The author also tries to show that our world also has flaws. I think the author tried to go too far into the future because it might be a long time until we invent or do things [are bad] as: people come and take your dishes at night, when you get hurt or have pain, they bring a pill to you and the pain just goes away.
I believe this book should not be intended for children or young adults, I think it should be for people 14 years and up. This book should not have been made for everyone because it shows a kid that committing suicide will get you out of a problem or a bad situation. This book haunts me in my sleep and I am 12, I'm not scared of hardly anything but this book scared me. Just think about it, would you want your child to be reading a book where a 12 year old washes and cleans and elderly person? Would you want your child to be reading a book where somebody injects a baby in the head with some sort of liquid? Would you want your child to be reading a book where a boy dreams of bathing a girl in his sleep? If I could, I would ban this book in any library or store. Because of these reasons, I give The Giver one out of five stars.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I think that The Giver was worth reading at some parts, however it was very predictable. First, in my opinion, The Giver is a great book because it teaches you a lesson. The book shows us how grateful we should be for what we have. Second, it was a very interesting book because of the descriptions of the community. I like how it illustrated their daily lives. Finally, the length of the chapters are very appropriate for the level of the book. They were not too short and not too long. All in all, even though I expected what was going to happen in The Giver it was definitely a beneficial read.
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