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The Gods Were Astronauts: Evidence of the True Identities of the Old 'Gods' [Audiobook, CD, Unabridged] [Audio CD]

Erich von Daniken , Kevin Foley
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Book Description

April 26 2011
Erich von Däniken has exhaustively researched and analyzed the great world religions, their myths and belief structures, in an effort to find an answer to a question that has fascinated humans for millennia: who, or what, were the Gods described in ancient stories?

His extraordinary conclusion? The Gods were not metaphysical beings born of humanity's overactive imagination, but extraterrestrials who left traces of their presence everywhere on Earth.

The book includes:

—The suggestion, based on a thorough examination of ancient texts, that alien beings employed high-tech vehicles in epic aerial battles

—Compelling evidence that the Gods used awesome weapons of mass annihilation, both against themselves and humankind

—A radical new interpretation of evolution on Earth that contradicts both established religions and modern science

Product Details


Product Description

About the Author

Erich von Daniken is the author of the worldwide bestseller Chariots of the Gods and its follow-up, The Eyes of the Sphinx, in addition to over two dozen other books.

Kevin Foley has over thirty years' experience in radio and television broadcasting, commercial voice-overs, and audiobook narration. He has recorded over 150 audiobooks, and he won an Earphones Award from AudioFile magazine for his narration of Cognitive Surplus by Clay Shirky.

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3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly the same old stuff Jan. 19 2004
Format:Paperback
This book seems to be a collection of scattered thoughts that have only a small thread of commonality, and it's not all about ancient astronauts.
Von Daniken begins by describing his own concept of what "God" is, namely an infallible, timeless, omnipresent and omnipotent spiritual being. He then points out some of the inconsistencies of the Old Testament that contradict this concept, and concludes that the Biblical God can't be the real deal. All this has been covered before by others, though he doesn't get into the specifics of god comparisons that authors like Sitchin have done.
Chapter two deals with apparitions and miracles associated with Mary, the Mother of God. He says that any theologian worth his PhD knows Jesus wasn't God, therefore there's no Mother of God, therefore these miracles must be caused by someone else. He suggests that perhaps there's an extraterrestrial power at work doing this stuff. Uh huh... OK, Erich.
By now you're half way through the book (there's only 4 chapters), and nothing's been said about gods from space.
Chapter three talks about the religion and archetecture of the country of Myanmar (Burma). It seems their temples all look like golden spaceships or something. (Yawn)
The last chapter is the meat of the book, where he writes about the gods of ancient India, and the tremendous volumes of stories that exist in their literature. Flying craft the size of cities, celestial battles and outrageous weapons of the gods. That's what I bought the book for, but I'm not sure it was worth the price.
Throughout this book, Von Daniken gets on his soap box and preaches about how the scientific, religious, and media communities squash any free thinking that falls outside the mainstream. The Vatican lies about what they know (really?), Archeologists hide anything that could counter conventional thought, etc, etc. Yes, we know this. But (sorry, Mr. Von Daniken), nobody who reads this book will ever be able to change that.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 out of 5 stars  10 reviews
21 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mostly the same old stuff Jan. 19 2004
By D. Cullen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book seems to be a collection of scattered thoughts that have only a small thread of commonality, and it's not all about ancient astronauts.
Von Daniken begins by describing his own concept of what "God" is, namely an infallible, timeless, omnipresent and omnipotent spiritual being. He then points out some of the inconsistencies of the Old Testament that contradict this concept, and concludes that the Biblical God can't be the real deal. All this has been covered before by others, though he doesn't get into the specifics of god comparisons that authors like Sitchin have done.
Chapter two deals with apparitions and miracles associated with Mary, the Mother of God. He says that any theologian worth his PhD knows Jesus wasn't God, therefore there's no Mother of God, therefore these miracles must be caused by someone else. He suggests that perhaps there's an extraterrestrial power at work doing this stuff. Uh huh... OK, Erich.
By now you're half way through the book (there's only 4 chapters), and nothing's been said about gods from space.
Chapter three talks about the religion and archetecture of the country of Myanmar (Burma). It seems their temples all look like golden spaceships or something. (Yawn)
The last chapter is the meat of the book, where he writes about the gods of ancient India, and the tremendous volumes of stories that exist in their literature. Flying craft the size of cities, celestial battles and outrageous weapons of the gods. That's what I bought the book for, but I'm not sure it was worth the price.
Throughout this book, Von Daniken gets on his soap box and preaches about how the scientific, religious, and media communities squash any free thinking that falls outside the mainstream. The Vatican lies about what they know (really?), Archeologists hide anything that could counter conventional thought, etc, etc. Yes, we know this. But (sorry, Mr. Von Daniken), nobody who reads this book will ever be able to change that.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The author is obsessed with his theory Jan. 19 2014
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This man is totally obsessed with his "alien theory" and everything he reads or hears has to do with ancient aliens coming to earth. Don't waste your time and money, you will get bored before you reach the middle of the book.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mind Provocing Nov. 12 2012
By Derek - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The book "the Gods were Astronauts" is a very interesting book to read.
Quite a new way to look at things.

I would however suggest reading the Book "Chariots of the Gods?" first.

Cheers Derek.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good one July 20 2008
By Erik - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Von Däniken has an interesting theory about the ancient gods. It is a theory worth reading and thinking about. No one knows what the true is; maybe the Bible is right, maybe von Däniken, maybe.....
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertainment is a matter of taste..... Dec 25 2007
By Bryan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Sure the book is rather aimless for three quarters of the pages. Every single book you read in life can't be a work of art or 100 % entertainment. This book is a work of obscure passion but passion none-the-less. Erich is honest in his work. He never makes claims or statements that he can't back up. He presents the facts in ways that are at worst "unlikely" and at best " technically plausible". The bottom line on any of his work I think is how badly do you want to believe? If you are open minded, he can generally present a case for his beliefs that you can intellectually consider. If you require scientific proof along the way, don't waste your time. It's not really science nor meant to be. It's not really about religion except for in relation to his personal views of God. I have a soft spot for all his works because I grew up reading them. Very heady stuff for a kid :)
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