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The Grand Inquisitor: With Related Chapters from the Brothers Karamazov Paperback – Oct 1993


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Hackett Pub Co Inc (October 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0872201937
  • ISBN-13: 978-0872201934
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 14 x 22.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #374,095 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

This collection gives us a sense of the depth of Dostoevsky's insights into human life and suffering and of his profound understanding of the tensions and dangers of modernity. Guignon's Introduction is a brilliant study that shows how profoundly the 'legend of the Grand Inquisitor' speaks to our day. --Charles Taylor, McGill University Guignon's Introduction is by far the best available to these texts, and is, for its clarity and depth, one of the finest Introductions to complex literary or philosophical material that I've ever read. --Stephen L. Collins, Babson College This text worked beautifully in my Intro to the Western Humanities course. I especially appreciated Guignon's insightful Introduction, the selection of chapters, the clear layout. --Dan Spencer, University of Montana

About the Author

Charles B Guignon is Professor of Philosophy, The University of South Florida. Charles Guignon is Professor of Philosophy, University of South Florida.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Caleb Boyd on March 18 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is a collection of select chapters from "The Brothers Karamazov."
There is a lengthy introduction that explains in detail the author's philosophy and how it is revealed in each of the four chapters presented here.
"The Brothers Make Friends" is simply here to introduce the two brothers Ivan and Alyosha. Ivan is the Europeanized lover of science, and Alyosha is the young Romantic. Dostoevsky uses his characters as representatives of different worldviews, and develops action in such a way to show how each worldview could be flawed.
In "Rebellion," Ivan's character is developed as he reveals his disdain at the suffering of children and how cruel it seems since they are without sin. Ivan says that he realizes there is suffering and that no one is responsible. This shocks him because he values order, and yet there seems to be no justice in the world.
In "The Grand Inquisitor" chapter, Ivan tells a fable based in the Spanish Inquisition in which the Catholic Inquistor judges Christ, who has returned. He condemns Christ to death saying he valued freedom of faith over mankind's happiness (in ignorance of freedom).
This small book concludes with the incredible story of Father Zossima. In the "Russian Monk," Dostoevsky explains the old Russian, holistic vision of sobornost (love of the entire world and one's taking responsibilty for the sins of all). In this worldview, if all choose to follow it, all will serve all and the world will be a paradise.
Dostoevsky's storytelling is very emotional, and not so much picturesque. But there is so much impact in his words and message! This book is one of my all-time favorites, and I cannot wait to read "The Brothers Karamazov" in its entirity. This, probably, could also serve as a great introduction to Dostoevsky.
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Format: Paperback
Guignon's essay is borne out of and reflects such a genuine enthusiasm that it's ultimately worthwhile to read it just for fun even if you happen to disagree with his interpretation of the fable. It certainly provoked me into returning to and re-reading Dostoevsky's tale.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 13 reviews
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
An interesting Christian view March 18 2003
By Caleb Boyd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is a collection of select chapters from "The Brothers Karamazov."
There is a lengthy introduction that explains in detail the author's philosophy and how it is revealed in each of the four chapters presented here.
"The Brothers Make Friends" is simply here to introduce the two brothers Ivan and Alyosha. Ivan is the Europeanized lover of science, and Alyosha is the young Romantic. Dostoevsky uses his characters as representatives of different worldviews, and develops action in such a way to show how each worldview could be flawed.
In "Rebellion," Ivan's character is developed as he reveals his disdain at the suffering of children and how cruel it seems since they are without sin. Ivan says that he realizes there is suffering and that no one is responsible. This shocks him because he values order, and yet there seems to be no justice in the world.
In "The Grand Inquisitor" chapter, Ivan tells a fable based in the Spanish Inquisition in which the Catholic Inquistor judges Christ, who has returned. He condemns Christ to death saying he valued freedom of faith over mankind's happiness (in ignorance of freedom).
This small book concludes with the incredible story of Father Zossima. In the "Russian Monk," Dostoevsky explains the old Russian, holistic vision of sobornost (love of the entire world and one's taking responsibilty for the sins of all). In this worldview, if all choose to follow it, all will serve all and the world will be a paradise.
Dostoevsky's storytelling is very emotional, and not so much picturesque. But there is so much impact in his words and message! This book is one of my all-time favorites, and I cannot wait to read "The Brothers Karamazov" in its entirity. This, probably, could also serve as a great introduction to Dostoevsky.
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Definitely worth a look Nov. 16 1999
By Mr. H. A. Naqvi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Guignon's essay is borne out of and reflects such a genuine enthusiasm that it's ultimately worthwhile to read it just for fun even if you happen to disagree with his interpretation of the fable. It certainly provoked me into returning to and re-reading Dostoevsky's tale.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Opening doors. Sept. 8 2012
By Don - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
By reading this small book one is exposed to the most grand panoramic view of human nature and human foibles. I was particularly awakened to perverted attempts and distorted motivations for being as saintly as one can be. This little book is, in my judgement, a powerful and highly informative insight into human nature.
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
brilliant required reading April 6 2009
By Robert W. Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Dostoyevski does it again. Fortunately, in this brief book (as compared to much of his popular writing), he explores the inquisition and the racial / ethnic / religious factors therein. I can't comment on the accuracy of the translation in any way, other than I found this to be an immensely pleasurable and fascinating read! I highly recommend it! A.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Decent July 7 2014
By Marie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is okay, but if you are interested in this and want the full experience, then I recommend buying to actual book the Brother Karamazov (which I read before needing this for a class). You will not get the full experience or gain a true understanding of the message if you just read the passages here. The full book is wonderful and I would recommend that over this.


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