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The Hook Mass Market Paperback – Apr 1 2001


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (April 1 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446609560
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446609562
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 10.4 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,792,035 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Format: Mass Market Paperback
After I wrote my own review for myfiles, I read the 29 reviews here.I found each one to be helpful inthe various points they made. Iliked the way Westlake writes with tongue in cheek and generally tothe point. He gives insight intomoderen day publishing woes andhow the computer skims over thebooks to select the top writers,shuting down the market for thenew comers and mid-level writers. Here we have Wayne and Bryce meetin the library after a twenty yearlapse in contact. Both are frustrated, Bryce by writer's block and Wayne unable to publish his finished book. Bryce offersto "rewrite" Wayne's book underhis name and split the million +advance if Wayne will but get ridof Lucie, his money grabbing wife.The pact is made and Wayne meeteLucie for a date. In her apartmentto say good-night, Wayne suddenlyattacks Lucie and beats her to death. He collects his money, starts writing for magazines andforgets about the killing. Brycecan't stop imagining how it wasand goes into a depression. Hisagent is pressing for evidence of his next book but Bryce can'twrite anything but gibberish. Heneeds Wayne to help him. The twoagain try to make something outof a half-finished book of Wayne'sbut it isn't working. Only a fewpages of The Hook remain so how isthis to end so soon. Just like aHitchcock story...unexpectedly andyou get to complete it youself.Those readers who wanted more charcter development need to realize that men like Wayne, a cold-blooded killer, and Bryce, amanic-depressive don't have theessentials to be developed unlessthey get proper therapy. Therejust isn't any way to identify with these men unless you havewalked in their shoes and know thefeeling.I liked the way Westlake writes and hope to read The Ax.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
After I wrote my own review for myfiles, I read the 29 reviews here.I found each one to be helpful inthe various points they made. Iliked the way Westlake writes with tongue in cheek and generally tothe point. He gives insight intomoderen day publishing woes andhow the computer skims over thebooks to select the top writers,shuting down the market for thenew comers and mid-level writers. Here we have Wayne and Bryce meetin the library after a twenty yearlapse in contact. Both are frustrated, Bryce by writer's block and Wayne unable to publish his finished book. Bryce offersto "rewrite" Wayne's book underhis name and split the million +advance if Wayne will but get ridof Lucie, his money grabbing wife.The pact is made and Wayne meeteLucie for a date. In her apartmentto say good-night, Wayne suddenlyattacks Lucie and beats her to death. He collects his money, starts writing for magazines andforgets about the killing. Brycecan't stop imagining how it wasand goes into a depression. Hisagent is pressing for evidence of his next book but Bryce can'twrite anything but gibberish. Heneeds Wayne to help him. The twoagain try to make something outof a half-finished book of Wayne'sbut it isn't working. Only a fewpages of The Hook remain so how isthis to end so soon. Just like aHitchcock story...unexpectedly andyou get to complete it youself.Those readers who wanted more charcter development need to realize that men like Wayne, a cold-blooded killer, and Bryce, amanic-depressive don't have theessentials to be developed unlessthey get proper therapy. Therejust isn't any way to identify with these men unless you havewalked in their shoes and know thefeeling.I liked the way Westlake writes and hope to read The Ax.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Cleverness is no substitute for a plausible story with convincing characters. Donald E. Westlake's THE HOOK is a psychological thriller about a murderous collaboration between two novelists. It is also a tutorial on how not to write a suspense novel. Throughout the book, Westlake's antiheroes discuss the difficulty in writing good fiction and cite failings in their own prose, such as inconsistent characters and a novel's premise that is at best a short story. The joke is on the reader for the much acclaimed Westlake is far too talented not to be referring to his own book.
Naming his protagonists Proctorr and Prentice for proctor and apprentice and titling their fictional works, The Domino Doublet, Two Faces in the Mirror, The Shadowed Other, does not make the grade as philosophical inquiry, psychological insight or character development. Instead of a meaningful intelligent story the reader gets gamesmanship.
Westlake places concept over believability resulting in an impossible premise that requires inconceivable behavior by the characters. After a quick set-up in Chapter 1 and an early climax in Chapter 8, Westlake spends much of the book's other twenty-nine chapters explaining his characters and excusing himself. In Chapter 17 he admits as much when he writes, "Some behavior is wrong, some reaction is wrong. It's a rip in the fabric of the novel, but it's necessary to get the story where it has to go, so the novelist merely sighs and shakes his head and does it." In real life, both Proctorr and Prentice would be in custody by Chapter 9. After numerous dead ends, Westlake surrenders and leaves his story's conclusion to the reader to resolve.
Still one has to admire Mr. Westlake's fearlessness as he writes about a literary star's work being published, regardless of merit, solely on the strength of the author's name and past sales.
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