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The Human Brain: An Introduction to Its Functional Anatomy, 5e Paperback – Nov 12 2001


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Nolte's The Human Brain: An Introduction to its Functional Anatomy, 7e
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 650 pages
  • Publisher: Mosby; 5 edition (Nov. 12 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0323013201
  • ISBN-13: 978-0323013208
  • Product Dimensions: 27.5 x 21.3 x 2.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #560,315 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

About the Author

John Nolte, PhD, Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 6 2002
Format: Paperback
It's a great INTRODUCTORY neuroanatomy text, simple and too the point, with lots of MRI's, gross sections, and cross sections. However, sometimes simplicity tends to increase the complexity of a subject. This especially holds true for neuroanatomy. One simply must learn certain details in order to grasp the big picture. This book is a little lacking in such details. I found the schematics using clay for different brain structures to be confusing (you'll see what I mean if you get the text). Also, it doesn't have a lot of clinical case material for medical students, which would have helped me. If you want a GREAT neuroanatomy text, I recommend Hal Blumenfeld's Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases. Keep in mind though that this text is tailored for the medical student in mind.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 15 reviews
24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
Seems like an awful lot to pay for an atlas... March 6 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It's a great INTRODUCTORY neuroanatomy text, simple and too the point, with lots of MRI's, gross sections, and cross sections. However, sometimes simplicity tends to increase the complexity of a subject. This especially holds true for neuroanatomy. One simply must learn certain details in order to grasp the big picture. This book is a little lacking in such details. I found the schematics using clay for different brain structures to be confusing (you'll see what I mean if you get the text). Also, it doesn't have a lot of clinical case material for medical students, which would have helped me. If you want a GREAT neuroanatomy text, I recommend Hal Blumenfeld's Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases. Keep in mind though that this text is tailored for the medical student in mind.
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Very readable May 12 2005
By ISaidThat - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be quite readable for a textbook. The chapter on vasculature of the brain was invaluable when it came to providing a background for a professor's unreadable and textually-sparse lecture notes. It isn't as dense as Moore and Dailey's Clinically Oriented Anatomy is with details or specifics of anatomy, but it's still reasonably complete while remaining readable. (Of course, I'm just comparing style, not content, as Moore and Dailey don't really cover the brain in any detail in that text, so are basically useless for neuroanatomy.) I don't usually read textbooks when lecture notes are available, but this text was an exception. With the neurology block coming at the end of my first year of medical school, I needed a change in study methods to keep my brain from exploding and found that this worked. The electron micrographs in it are great, as well. At least with the histology photos, I kept getting distracted from the text to look at the pictures and read the captions -- it's always nice when you get distracted from studying by your studies.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Anatomy oriented Nov. 10 2006
By V. Akle - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It is a very good book. It is concise in its explanations and the details are enough for someone who needs an anatomical view of the brain as opposed to a cellular or molecular approach. The pictures are fantastic. I use them for clarification all the time.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Excellent Jan. 15 2008
By Magellan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Many years ago I used the great Noback and Demarest text in grad school, but books like these are a big improvement over what was available back when I was in school. The illustrations are nothing less than stunning, and the text is clear and well written as well. It's more readable than many texts on the subject that I've suffered through over the years. The area of functional neuroanatomy is one of the most interesting areas because of the obvious practical applications, and so it's easier to motivate the study of this aspect of the subject, and readable and detailed texts like this make the subject enjoyable to study.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Amazing ook July 26 2007
By Carlos J. Cogollo - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is an amazing book, It's easy to read, good graphics, It's everything you need for completely understand of the human brain anatomy.


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