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The Hunt for Red October Mass Market Paperback – Aug 6 2002


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley; Open market ed edition (Aug. 6 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425133516
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425133514
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 2.8 x 17.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 249 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (248 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #609,414 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Somewhere under the Atlantic, a Soviet sub commander has just made a fateful decision: the Red October is heading west. The Americans want her. The Russians want her back. And the most incredible chase in history is on....

The Hunt for Red October is the runaway bestseller that launched Tom Clancy's phenomenal career. A military thriller so accurate and convincing that the author was rumored to have been debriefed by the White House. Its theme: the greatest espionage coup in history. Its story: the chase for a runaway top secret Russian missile sub. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

From the reviews of The Hunt for Red October: 'Flawless authenticity! frighteningly genuine.' Wall Street Journal 'Absolutely terrific: entertaining, suspenseful and masterfully written! superlative.' Washington Times

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Captain First Rank Marko Ramius of the Soviet Navy was dressed for the Arctic conditions normal to the Northern Fleet submarine base at Polyarnyy. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JLind555 on Feb. 22 2004
Format: Hardcover
Somewhere in the North Atlantic, a Russian sub breaks away from its patrol route and makes a mad dash for the coast of the United States. Are the Soviets planning a stealth attack or what? The Americans don't have a clue. Oddly enough, neither do the Soviets. The sub's captain, Marko Ramius, is a man with a deep loathing and resentment towards the government of his homeland, and he's planned a spectacular revenge. It falls to a lower-level CIA functionary named Jack Ryan to figure out what's afoot: Ramius and his crew are attempting to defect to the United States, bringing a billion-dollar present with them.
Tom Clancy has churned out dozens of novels since, of descending quality; "Red October" was his first and it's by far his best. He goes into great technical detail describing the workings of a submarine but he explains it so well that any reader can understand what he's saying. His characters aren't very profound, but characterization isn't the main draw here; the hunt and the subsequent chase of Red October by the Americans, who want to keep it and the crew safe, and the Russians, who want to destroy it at any cost, keep us spellbound while turning page after page. Clancy didn't fall into the trap of venting out the political propaganda that spoiled so many of his later books; he keeps "Red October" squarely on target, concentrating on the thrill of the chase, and the actions rockets along non-stop from the first page to the last. If you read only one Clancy novel, this is definitely the one to go with. None of his other books can touch it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sean Andrews on Sept. 5 2001
Format: Hardcover
I've wanted to read a Tom Clancy novel for a long time. Since this is his first, one of his shortest, and since I have seen the enjoyable movie based on it, I thought I'd give this novel a try.
At first, the book was pretty exciting. It got off to a quick start, taking us aboard the Red October as it's about to head to sea.
Then the boredom slowly began to build up. Page after page, Clancy shows what is happening elsewhere as the crew of Red October defect. We learn what is happening in every U.S. government office, on every U.S. ship and submarine, on and on and on. Every twenty pages or so, the story returns to the Red October for a couple pages. Eventually, it seems like you go for 50 pages without reading about what's happening on the Red October.
What's more, his descriptiveness gets to you after a while. It's nice to learn in-depth details about certain relevant things, but when he goes into the history of a Russian official's letter opener (how he first received it and what he was doing in his life at the time), it just gets to be too much and too unimportant.
I now realize this is Clancy's style -- to paint a full picture in order to see everyone's point of view and to be completely thorough. But in the process, the plot is lost. The book loses its momentum and becomes completely boring. By page 272, I withdrew my bookmark and closed the book, escorting it to my pile of books to trade.
If I was someone with only a few books to read, I might have bore (pun intended) this out to the end, but I have too many books and too little time. Not even John Updike is this detailed and longwinded. Rent the movie instead!
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By Sharon McCarthy on Nov. 29 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This narrative presents one of the most frightening deceptions in modern history; Captain Marko Ramius intends to defect to America, while his crew remain loyal to the Soviet Union.

This deception is made doubly daring by the Soviet Navy's claim that he is a renegade who threatens independent missile launch. Luckily, the crew believes him after his sub is fired upon by a Soviet aircraft, narrowly escaping.

He says, "if they were really shooting at us, we'd be dead." This study in the psychology of leadership presents a fascinating conclusion: though there are only 12 officers aboard, the 180+ enlisted men obey them faithfully, simply because the naval code requires it. Apparently, that's what has the navigator so worked up when he exclaims, "we could have a mutiny on our hands."

The possibility of a renegade or "rogue" launching nuclear weapons is quite real. In today's new world order, that possibility is increased dramatically, as evidenced by the recent crisis in the formerly Soviet Chechnya. Some of the new states in the Commonwealth have nuclear weapons which were strategically placed by the Soviet equivalent of the Strategic Air Command.

Thus the Soviet ploy of telling the U.S. that the missile launch was imminent was actually a shrewd move. In this way, the U.S. would have to destroy the sub or else let on that top officials knew Ramius's true intentions, alerting the Soviets that their leadership had been penetrated by CIA.

However, since Ryan acted alone and used his own instinct, the U.S. was able to simulate the destruction of the sub and take it to Norfolk, VA, where it may remain today.

Interestingly enough, President Reagan endorsed this book when it was first published, implying that the story is true.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Review: Tom Clancy's The Hunt for Red October

It is December 1986 and Captain First Rank Marko Ramius, son of a dominant Communist Party Secretary and the Soviet Union's most confident and acclaimed submarine commander, is setting out to sea with his country's newest and greatest military venture. She contains an advanced new quiet propulsion system that allows her to almost perfectly escape both radar and sonar detection, a terrifying first strike vehicle. She is also carrying one-hundred and eighty two nuclear warheads and twenty-six missile delivery systems. Her name is Krazny Oktyabr (Red October) .Once at sea, Ramius contravenes his orders and disappears into the North Atlantic after setting a course for the Eastern Seaboard of the United States. Both Soviet and American leaders are petrified, but they insist on snowballing each other with false information. Fears of either a surprise attack on the US or a possible defection abound. Both navies go on full alert, eventually resulting in a massive confrontation in the North Atlantic. And, just for kicks, Clancy tosses the British into the mix to really confuse things!
As Clancy's first, and quite possibly best, work, I feel that this is a very firmly woven story all together. The characters, even those like the C.I.A. Deputy Director (Operations), Robert Ritter who do not appear for very long are exceedingly well developed and presented. The details in the book are amazing, from the encrypted messages to the details and intricacies of the interior of the submarines and the extensive knowledge of military protocol and procedure presented. It definitely gives an "eye opening" experience to the reader.
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