The Illustrated Man (Harper Perennial Modern Classics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading The Illustrated Man (Harper Perennial Modern Classics) on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Illustrated Man [Mass Market Paperback]

Ray Bradbury
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition --  
Hardcover CDN $17.32  
Paperback CDN $13.36  
Mass Market Paperback CDN $9.49  
Mass Market Paperback, Nov. 1 1983 --  
Audio, CD, Audiobook, CD, Unabridged CDN $21.41  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Nov. 1 1983 Grand Master Editions
The tattooed man moves, and in the arcane designs scrawled upon his skin swirled tales beyond imagining: tales of love and laughter darkness and death, of mankind’s glowing, golden past and its dim, haunted future. Here are eighteen incomparable stories that blend magic and truth in a kaleidoscope tapestry of wonder–woven by the matchless imagination of Ray Bradbury.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

From Amazon

That The Illustrated Man has remained in print since being published in 1951 is fair testimony to the universal appeal of Ray Bradbury's work. Only his second collection (the first was Dark Carnival, later reworked into The October Country), it is a marvelous, if mostly dark, quilt of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. In an ingenious framework to open and close the book, Bradbury presents himself as a nameless narrator who meets the Illustrated Man--a wanderer whose entire body is a living canvas of exotic tattoos. What's even more remarkable, and increasingly disturbing, is that the illustrations are themselves magically alive, and each proceeds to unfold its own story, such as "The Veldt," wherein rowdy children take a game of virtual reality way over the edge. Or "Kaleidoscope," a heartbreaking portrait of stranded astronauts about to reenter our atmosphere--without the benefit of a spaceship. Or "Zero Hour," in which invading aliens have discovered a most logical ally--our own children. Even though most were written in the 1940s and 1950s, these 18 classic stories will be just as chillingly effective 50 years from now. --Stanley Wiater

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up-Paul Hecht's calm, assured voice narrates this classic science fiction anthology by Ray Bradbury that brings to life the social and political fears prevalent in post World War II America, when they were first published. The unnamed narrator in the introduction watches the Illustrated Man's tattoos come to life presenting the 19 short stories. Resonant with authority, Hecht's voice presents rocket men in difficult circumstances, and yet he is able to be detached from their impending deaths. This is contrasted with the gentle tones of devotion of religious clerics. His speech presents a full variety of techniques. He changes pitch for the women characters, and modulates volume and speed to depict the full spectrum of emotions. Efficient production so that most stories are completed on a single side of a tape will enable teachers to locate easily a desired story for class presentation. Only a few of the shortest stories are two on a side. The wicked, colorful tattoos make a very eye-catching cover. A must for sci-fi fans!-Claudia Moore, W.T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
"Well," said George Hadley. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Impressive work, nothing less June 11 2010
Format:Mass Market Paperback
We had the chance to have The Illustrated Man as an assignment in secondary school ESL, and ever since I just knew I would have to buy it one day. I am not even a fan of science-fiction (I can't imagine picking up a sci-fi novel on my own), nor are my friends, yet they all called shotgun to borrow it from me as soon as I was done, because they too wanted to plunge back into Bradbury's imagination now that our English has improved.

The perspective of the author and the observations he makes on mankind by just telling these short, unrelated stories in a different setting than the one we are used to are truly a valuable experience that I would recommend to anyone.
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Skin illustrations, the sign of an artist" Aug. 1 2010
By bernie TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
"Eighteen illustrations, eighteen tales." "The illustrations came to life..."

A man is encountered who has skin Illustrations all over his body. Each illustration represents a tale from the future. The illustrations come to life and tell a tale of doom or impending doom. In this way ray Bradbury can tell related but different tales in this book. Its Bradbury's writing style and dialogue that holds you as much as the storyline.

At first they are intriguing and fresh. Later they don't as much repeat but are similar in form and function.

One of the best "The Veldt" is first. Of course everyone will have a different favorite.

I suggest that you make your cats leave the room if you read out loud.

The Veldt (Classics Stories of Ray Bradbury)
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars "Skin illustrations, the sign of an artist" Sept. 16 2006
By bernie TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
"Eighteen illustrations, eighteen tales." "The illustrations came to life..."

A man is encountered who has skin Illustrations all over his body. Each illustration represents a tale from the future. The illustrations come to life and tell a tale of doom or impending doom. In this way ray Bradbury can tell related but different tales in this book. Its Bradbury's writing style and dialogue that holds you as much as the storyline.

At first they are intriguing and fresh. Later they don't as much repeat but are similar in form and function.

One of the best "The Veldt" is first. Of course everyone will have a different favorite.

I suggest that you make your cats leave the room if you read out loud.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Ray Bradbury's timeless classic Sept. 9 2006
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is one of the best collections of Ray Bradbury short stories to be found. The Illustrated Man of the title is a fairground worker who is covered in tattoos, or 'illustrations'. While he sleeps the illustrations move and each one tells a different story to anyone who may see them. Although the descriptions of rockets and technology may seem a little dated now, these are still excellent stories for any true fan of sci-fi. Particularly good are 'The Veldt' a story of two children and their virtual reality nursery and 'The Long Rain', a tale of astronauts who crash land on Venus. This is certainly a Classic of modern literature and I would highly recommend it for any bookshelf.
Was this review helpful to you?
3.0 out of 5 stars Opinions of Illustrations Sept. 6 2005
Format:Library Binding
The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury is a book full of interesting short stories. Each story is a continuation into a new story, which keeps the reader wanting more. Ray Bradbury has a large variety of topics in which he covers in his short stories " The Other Foot" and "The Man" are short stories that talked about racism and hints around religion, respectively. "The Other Foot" talks about the inequality of black people and how the Lord saw to it that the other race suffered in the end. "The Man" talks about a higher being where the moral is there is always something or someone better than you.
The Illustrated Man should be required reading in schools because every story had a moral behind it. And people need to know what good morals really are. This book is good reading for schools because it carries different spectrums of the world, and it can also help kids with their imagination and thinking what can become of the world in the future. This book talks about religion, racism, the future, and etc. Children and teens should know, hear, and see different things of the world today. And all the stories are well set up where you can follow and you are able to learn something from it.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Poignant Tales of Yesterday�s Future June 26 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This group of highly imaginative tales, written in 1948-51, do nothing if not illustrate that 1) it's extremely difficult to predict the future and 2) no matter how much we struggle against it, we probably are doomed to reflect our own times and cultural environment. Over half a century after Ray Bradbury wrote these entertaining stories, we have a lot of answers to questions about the (then) future thanks to hindsight. Bradbury's characters still smoke like chimneys, they still use clunky mid-20th century machines for the most part---lugging electrical equipment and card tables across the light years in their bronze spaceships. There's only the vaguest hint of a computer ("The City") and then of the giant, controlling variety. Above all, there is no vision of the infinitely varied America of today---the space explorers in these stories are nearly all white Anglosaxons who speak and behave as white people did in the early 1950s. The cultural oppositions and arguments in the stories are those of mid-century America. While it is true that Bradbury writes of human nature it is also true that the nature he describes is as we saw it half a century ago.
However, Bradbury covers a wide range of topics: child psychology; machine vs. man; imagination and emotion vs. cold science; religion; time travel, and race relations. Some of the stories are unbelievably poignant. In fact, I would say that poignancy---the ability to bring out that quality without being sappy or twee---is Bradbury's strongest suit. If you don't like science fiction, this book probably isn't for you, but it certainly has made its mark on American culture, with 47 printings through 1990. One story, "The Exiles", probably laid the basis for his later "Fahrenheit 451".
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Illustrated man
I really enjoyed this book. It is an interesting read with many short stories. It arrived much faster than the estimated time frame which is always nice.
Published 13 months ago by Alexandra Laking
5.0 out of 5 stars If you don't like Science Fiction......
read this and change your mind.
The narrator met a man covered in tattos, tattos that moved to tell stories, eighteen of which are told in this volume. Read more
Published on June 3 2004 by Jeanne Tassotto
5.0 out of 5 stars Bradbury is a master storyteller
These are stories that go beyond "science fiction." The technology aspects are part of the canvas, but these stories are powerful because Bradbury paints with emotion... Read more
Published on March 29 2004 by Angela Bull
5.0 out of 5 stars Bradbury is an absolute master of the short story
While the cover of the paperback that I read states that Bradbury is "The World's Greatest Living Science Fiction Writer", I respectfully disagree. Read more
Published on Feb. 26 2004 by Charles Ashbacher
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful....
I think there are two types of people in the world--those who appreciate Ray Bradbury and those who don't. Read more
Published on Jan. 24 2004 by Jeremy D
4.0 out of 5 stars Classic Science Fiction
The Illustrated Man is a collection of 18 science fiction short stories by genre master Ray Bradbury circa 1950, loosely tied together as a series of living images viewed on the... Read more
Published on Jan. 22 2004 by Gary Riley
1.0 out of 5 stars dosent deserve even 1 star
This is possibly the worst book that has ever been written. There is no plot, and no aparent theme unless you count death, misery, space, and martians. Read more
Published on Nov. 5 2003 by Nathan
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback