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The Immortalists
 
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The Immortalists [Kindle Edition]

Kyle Mills
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

Print List Price: CDN$ 16.04
Kindle Price: CDN$ 5.32 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
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Product Description

Product Description

Dr. Richard Draman is trying desperately to discover a cure for a disease that causes children to age at a wildly accelerated rate—a rare genetic condition that is killing his own daughter. When the husband of a colleague quietly gives him a copy of the classified work she was doing before her mysterious suicide, Draman finally sees a glimmer of hope.  The conclusions are stunning, with the potential to not only turn the field of biology on its head, but reshape the world.  Soon, though, he finds himself on the run, relentlessly pursued by a seemingly omnipotent group of men who will do whatever it takes to silence him.

About the Author

Kyle Mills is the New York Times bestselling author of eight books, including his award-winning The Second Horseman. Growing up in Oregon as a Bureau Kid, Kyle absorbed an enormous amount of information about the FBI, which he incorporates into his novels. He and his wife live in Wyoming and enjoy rock climbing.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 439 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas & Mercer (Dec 6 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00514OZ6A
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #62,375 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Good story May 20 2014
By Pamela W TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Ruthless men with money who will stop at nothing in their quest for immortality. That's the basis for this nerve tingling fast paced medical thriller. I wished for a happier ending but other than that I enjoyed it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Kyle Mills is great ... again May 5 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Kyle Mills delivers a tight yarn that I found difficult to put down. It was easy to escape my daily routine just for a while.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars  189 reviews
83 of 85 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Immortality can Kill You Oct. 26 2011
By Michael P. Lefand - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product
"The Immortalists" by Kyle Mills is a well written, action backed novel that has surprises in its telling and conclusion. I can't say this novel gripped me right from the start, but it did have me hooked after reading 40 pages. I received "The Immortalists" in the afternoon mail and began reading it after dinner and did not put it down till it fell from my hands as I dozed off 6 hours later.

Quick synopsis with no spoilers.

A research biologist, Dr. Richard Draman, who is working on shoestring budget to find a cure for progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome), a rare genetic condition that produces rapid aging in children, becomes the recipient of research data from a dead colleague, Annette Chevalier. Annette's research revolved around the "fundamental structures of life" and Richard believes this data may help him save his eight year old daughter, Susie, who has progeria so he has a personal stake in finding the cure. When Richard and his wife Carly seek help in analyzing the data from other prominent scientists they find themselves caught up in a conspiracy by a group of extremely wealthy men who want to keep Annette's findings secret. The secret could be the answer to immorality and those with money and power do not want to share it with people who live "mundane lives."

Richard and Carly become targets as they race to find the cure for their daughter while evading this secret group who has vast resources through power that wealth affords to track and kill them. They find themselves unable to turn to any type of authority because the tentacles of this group reach far into police and government agencies.

The novel was interesting and moved along at a well devised pace. It kept me wanting to know what would happen next and was entertaining, what good fiction should be. Why four instead of five stars? Because it does have some minor flaws, but not worth hashing out in a review.
50 of 55 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The spark was missing for me Nov. 14 2011
By K.Wagner - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product
This was an average thriller with a medical thread running through.
Susie had been born to Richard Draman, one of the top cancer researcher in the country. His
work was watched and was more promising than most, and he gave credit to his much higher than
average IQ. His intelligence, which got him into plenty of scrapes as a boy, also got him sent
to a boarding school where a teacher took Richard under his wing and the rest, as they way was history.

When Susie was born to Richard and his wife Carly, they knew immediately that she was one of the
few children in the world who suffered from Progeria, or rapid aging. Due to the fact that so few
children suffered from this disease, it got little notice from researchers. It also attracted little
money for anyone interested in doing such research, as Richard found when he left his lab and began
to research it himself. He was determined to save Susie and the other children he had come to know
with this disease.

After hearing of a death in the research community, a suicide, Draman was visited by the victims husband.
He brought with him a thumb drive that contained his wife's most recent work. He took it to Draman because
his reputation as a brilliant scientist was well known. And so began the thriller part of the novel.

This is not a bad book by any means. It just seems to sort of peter out after a while. It starts out
just fine and draws you in quickly. Then things just sort of begin to crumble. I can accept improbable...
this is a book, a story. In fact, improbable is intriguing when used skillfully. The premise that a
scientist was working on research that can turn back time, not only stop the aging process but reverse it,
is not new but it is interesting. The fact that something like that held promise to the victims of progeria
was not lost on Draman, and he was determined not to let anything stop him from completing what his colleague
had begun. Great!

What happened after they left their very ill daughter with a near stranger, (but darned nice guy) did
stretch my credibility just a bit too far.. especially what happened when they were making their way to
the one and only friend they had that might be able to help them. I won't spoil it for you, but it was a bit
much.

The ending ? I love a good strong ending in a book. This one did not have that. It seems that at a
certain point everything became about wrapping it up instead of finishing the story. Too bad... this
one had promise.
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "If something comes to life in others because of you, then you have made an approach to immortality." - Cousins Oct. 28 2011
By Cheryl Stout - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product
What would you do if offered the chance of immortality? Or, what would you do to help your child live a healthier, longer life? These are a couple of the questions posed in "The Immortalists."

Richard and Carly Draman are given a chance at helping their daughter, Susie, stricken with progeria.

Fund raising, laboratories, people who aren't what they appear to be, good people making bad choices, bad people making worse choices, chase scenes - all combine to give the reader an exciting look at the "what ifs" of an artificially-induced immortality.

I wish there had been a bit more character development of Susie so I could have gotten a little closer to her and how progeria affected her - from her POV. But all in all, I enjoyed the pacing and storyline, and I especially liked how the ending was handled.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gripping story with moral overtones Dec 15 2011
By Alex S - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I was unfamiliar with Kyle Mills as an author until I downloaded this book as a daily special on Kindle. but I was blown away.

With all of the scientific reality of Robin Cook, and all of the suspense of Dean Koontz, Kyle writes a story as believable as the headlines of today's news. In this story, Richard Dramun has invested his life in finding a cure for progeria, a battle he faces each day in the eyes of his own daughter. But the implications of finding a cure for this childhood disease go far beyond simply looking at the premature aging of these children, into the structure of aging itself.

When Richard is approached by the husband of a colleague who died in an apparent suicide, he begins to unravel a plot hiding the possibility of an actual cure to progeria and the end of aging.

From the moment he steps onto this path there is no turning back, and as he proceeds he has to make decisions concerning friendship, love, and the meaning behind life itself. What would he be willing to give up for a cure?

Well worth reading! I love finding great authors!
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not one of his best books Jan. 20 2012
By Suncoast - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Kyle Mills has been one of my favourite authors for many years for his political crime thrillers - "Fade" was one of my favourites. This latest book takes him into slightly different areas with a thriller about a search for anti-ageing treatments for both a young child who ages prematurely and a group of very rich and powerful men who want the treatment to regain their lost youth.

Recently I have read a few books by authors who excel in their normal genre but seem to have run out of ideas and unsuccessfully change to different types of plot, sometimes with unbelievable/fantasy themes. Kyle Mills has done this with "The Immortalists" - it is not one of his best works, but I am still a long term fan of his work.
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Popular Highlights

 (What's this?)
&quote;
Its interesting how a random event can change our lives in ways that would be impossible to imagine, isnt it? &quote;
Highlighted by 26 Kindle users
&quote;
Hutchinson-Gilford syndromemore commonly known as progeria. &quote;
Highlighted by 25 Kindle users
&quote;
The most important thing to remember about evolution is that it doesnt have a purpose. Its just about passing on more genes than your competitors at any given moment. &quote;
Highlighted by 23 Kindle users

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