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The Japanese Kitchen Paperback – Aug 27 2007


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Paperback, Aug 27 2007
CDN$ 44.99 CDN$ 30.16

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Kyle Books; 1 edition (Aug. 27 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904920667
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904920663
  • Product Dimensions: 19.9 x 1.8 x 26 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 839 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,042,182 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

KIMIKO BARBER (U.K.) is the author of Sushi, Taste and Technique; Easy Noodles; and Japanese Pure and Simple.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
As a small child growing up in Japan, I never thought it strange that gohan, the word for 'cooked rice,' also meant 'a meal.' Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. J. Thompson TOP 500 REVIEWER on May 3 2011
Format: Paperback
This is one of the gems in my cookbook library. It is not a typical cookery book as such, although it does contain some 200 recipes. Rather, it is a compendium of articles on 100 basic ingredients in Japanese cuisine all categorized under 14 different headings. Each item is nicely illustrated and accompanied by a useful, detailed explanatory text and each entry includes a couple of recipes using the ingredient in question. In addition, there is a good introductory chapter about Japanese culture and cuisine as well as many beautiful photographs detailing scenes from Japan. Ultimately, it is not a book for the casual cook but it is the sort of publication that all serious foodies will love to browse through.
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Format: Hardcover
Not only do you learn about the various ingredients which are indigenous to the country, and essential to their cuisine but it is a trip thoughout the country, through pictures and text to the wonderful sights and aromas of this mysterious land. Familiar foods are prepared in totally different ways, and new ones are there to explore. With the advent of many ethnic food shops and open markets catering to many different cuisines one is now able to put a Japanese dish on your own table. Good reading without cooking as well.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
a brilliant introduction to Japanese food Feb. 6 2005
By joey ap simon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The ingredients-led entries in this book make it easy to follow and I was amazed by how simple many of the recipes were. The five that I've made have all worked extremely well and been delicious. The photography is stunning and really brought alive the world that is Japanese cooking. I read about the book in Newsweek and thoroughly agree it's one of the best cookbooks I've found in the US during 2004. Just fab.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A lovely book for foodies May 3 2011
By C. J. Thompson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is one of the gems in my cookbook library. It is not a typical cookery book as such, although it does contain some 200 recipes. Rather, it is a compendium of articles on 100 basic ingredients in Japanese cuisine all categorized under 14 different headings. Each item is nicely illustrated and accompanied by a useful, detailed explanatory text and each entry includes a couple of recipes using the ingredient in question. In addition, there is a good introductory chapter about Japanese culture and cuisine as well as many beautiful photographs detailing scenes from Japan. Ultimately, it is not a book for the casual cook but it is the sort of publication that all serious foodies will love to browse through.
A good companion volume Nov. 2 2014
By Jadepearl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
An absolute must have book to add to your collection, in particular, Japanese cookery. I was surprised that this one had slipped by me. It provides historical and cultural context for all the ingredients and includes recipes that are very easy to execute. An example of organization is the ingredient, daikon (Japanese radish), with the kanji and English title then followed with a historic description, how it grows, appearance and taste, buying and storing, health benefits, culinary uses and then simple recipes that focus on it, as an ingredient. If an ingredient has multiple types, like soy sauce, she will choose the most common variant for recipes. One drawback is that she does not provide the names of preferred brands or the kanji so I can purchase the variant, if I want.

The pictures were are well done but are not step-by-step but of the finished product or more general interest photos.

It is a not, however, a complete volume of Japanese cookery. An example is the book does not have an equipment description of common Japanese kitchen items such as, the mandoline, or otabushi. There is also not a Japanese food technique section regarding simmering, as another example. There can be a bit of confusion about an ingredient name and a more common name (kanten is also agar-agar.) This is why the book is an excellent companion volume to other books.
The recipes provide both volume and weight measurements, though the liquid is done with volume. My particular version of the book was NOT in metric measurements.

This is an excellent book to have just for the background it provides, in addition, to the recipes. Highly recommended.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The Japanese Kitchen Cookbook Jan. 9 2007
By AliMarie - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I was thrilled to be able to purchase this book through Amazon. It was out of print in Australia and my father was desperate to have it. The book is the best collection of authentic Japanese recipes we have ever seen.
Being newly interested in Japanese cuisine... Dec 29 2009
By tomtom - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I found this book a treasure. The organization is, as the title suggests, around the key ingredients that are essential to Japanese cuisine. The ingredients are grouped in sections such as noodles, vegetables, tofu and related products, fish & shellfish, herbs & spices, etc. Each major ingredient has a page or two with a description, uses, and a recipe or two that highlight that ingredient. These are classic recipes that are basic to Japanese cuisine and serve as a wonderful introduction to the simplicity and beauty of these dishes. The photos are big and brilliant and this book would do as well as a coffee table art book as a kitchen reference. There is also a short section in the beginning that introduces the reader to a brief history of Japan and how the culture has evolved with its cuisine. Taken one recipe at a time, it opens up a whole world that is Japanese cuisine.

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