The Jew of Malta - Classic Illustrated Edition and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Jew of Malta (New Mermaids Series) Paperback – Jan 1 1966


See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, Jan 1 1966
CDN$ 8.51

2014 Books Gift Guide
Yes Please, the eagerly anticipated first book from Amy Poehler, the Golden Globe winning star of Parks and Recreation, is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas


Hero Quick Promo
Boxing Day Kindle Deals
Load your library with over 30 popular fiction books and more, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Benn (Jan. 1 1966)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0510338364
  • ISBN-13: 978-0510338367
  • Product Dimensions: 19.3 x 12.2 x 1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
I do not feel this matches Marlowe's "Faustus," "Massacre At Paris," "Dido Queen of Carthage," or "Edward II." But it does have some memorable features. At first, Barabas is a sympathetic character, but like many of Marlowe's characters, he goes too far and becomes detestable. Barabas' daughter Abigail is a striking figure. She initially feels sorry for her father but later sees what he has become and falls victim to her father's wickedness. Her death as a Christain in 3.6 is memorable. Ithamore is convincing as a villain who knows no honor. Ferneze is fine as the hero who eventually restores order. It's not Marlowe's best play, but it is still worth some interest.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Infinite riches in a little play Oct. 12 2006
By Buffy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Ok, so perhaps not infinite, but lots. Marlowe's plays are all a bit strange in their own way. The Jew of Malta is sort of like a really raw take on the issues in the Merchant of Venice (i.e. no sweet love story here). But Marlowe's Barabas gets to enjoy being bad a lot more than Shylock does, and the character is amazingly capable of perhaps not earning the reader's sympathy but extracting her complicity instead. There's some great language in this play and some spectacular misanthropy. The revels editions are always a good bet; they have enough scholarly apparatus to be of significant help and are well-edited and well laid-out on the page. This one is very thin and portable, and so it can feel like a rip-off for 9 bucks. However, the quality of the critical help here is far greater than in the Everyman collected edition of Marlowe.
paperback not same edition as hardback May 2 2013
By Bundy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Roma Gill hardback edition has a fine introduction surveying Marlowe's life as it connects to the play, previous editions, detailed notes which do much to bring the play alive, illustrations including maps and a playbill, index & biblography.

Just be aware that the paperback version has a different editor, and may not have the same range of scholarly material.

I had to rate it for the review to be used--would have preferred to leave the stars open.
Five Stars Aug. 1 2014
By Kimspeare - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Quite excellent in condition!!
Highly recommendable.
2 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Not Marlowe's Best, But Still Interesting. March 25 2000
By Sean Ares Hirsch - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I do not feel this matches Marlowe's "Faustus," "Massacre At Paris," "Dido Queen of Carthage," or "Edward II." But it does have some memorable features. At first, Barabas is a sympathetic character, but like many of Marlowe's characters, he goes too far and becomes detestable. Barabas' daughter Abigail is a striking figure. She initially feels sorry for her father but later sees what he has become and falls victim to her father's wickedness. Her death as a Christain in 3.6 is memorable. Ithamore is convincing as a villain who knows no honor. Ferneze is fine as the hero who eventually restores order. It's not Marlowe's best play, but it is still worth some interest.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback