The Juan Doe Murders: A Smokey Brandon Thriller and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
CDN$ 0.43
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 14-21 business days for delivery. Very good condition book with only light signs of previous use. Sail the Seas of Value.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Juan Doe Murders Library Binding – Nov 2000


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Library Binding
"Please retry"
CDN$ 62.59 CDN$ 0.43

Amazon.ca First Novel Award - 6 Canadian Novels Make the Shortlist
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.



Product Details

  • Library Binding: 221 pages
  • Publisher: Five Star (November 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786228970
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786228973
  • Product Dimensions: 22.3 x 14.6 x 1.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 399 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,391,300 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Edgar Award Nominee If you love CSI or NCIS, you'll love the mysteries of Noreen Ayres. This Edgar Award finalist was writing memorable and compelling crime fiction with a focus on forensics long before those shows emerged on the scene. She broke new ground in the crime fiction genre with The Juan Doe Murders and her two prior suspense novels featuring Smokey Brandon, an ex-Las-Vegas-stripper-and-police-officer-turned forensic criminalist. Smokey finds herself involved cases that cut a little too close to home - and Ayres' plucky heroine is as sunny and complex as the Southern California world where she solves crimes. In addition to her novels, Ayres is also an acclaimed short-story writer. Her stories have been featuring in many mystery and suspense anthologies and earned her an Edgar Award nomination for "Delta Double Deal," her contribution to the collection The Night Awakens. For gritty police procedurals with a fun and sexy twist, Noreen Ayres' Smokey Brandon series can't be beat. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Library Binding
Although part of a series, this book works as a stand-alone, (although if you're planning to read the series, I recommend starting with A World the Color of Salt.) Smokey Brandon, one-time stripper and now an evidence tech for a California crime lab, faces her toughest challenge yet in The Juan Doe murders. A couple of new characters are introduced, including the adult son of Smokey's older divorced lover. This book is edgy and suspenseful, as are all of Noreen's books, but this one took a dark, unexpected twist at the end. As always, Noreen's writing is crisp and true. Fans of Kathy Reichs and Patricia Cornwell will enjoy her graphic detail.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Library Binding
Noreen Ayres adds to her Smokey Brandon series with the darkest and most moody installment yet. The suspense is as heavy as fog, and the menace of the narrative is unrelenting. The novel asks you in, and it won't let you leave.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
the best yet in the smokey brandon series Jan. 30 2004
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
Although part of a series, this book works as a stand-alone, (although if you're planning to read the series, I recommend starting with A World the Color of Salt.) Smokey Brandon, one-time stripper and now an evidence tech for a California crime lab, faces her toughest challenge yet in The Juan Doe murders. A couple of new characters are introduced, including the adult son of Smokey's older divorced lover. This book is edgy and suspenseful, as are all of Noreen's books, but this one took a dark, unexpected twist at the end. As always, Noreen's writing is crisp and true. Fans of Kathy Reichs and Patricia Cornwell will enjoy her graphic detail.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Who is Juan Doe? April 24 2015
By C. S - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The Juan Doe Murders
Noreen Ayres
This is a 5 star without a doubt. Ayers is a new writer for me. However, this is her third book featuring Smokey Brandon. The first two "A World the Color of Salt"and "Carcass Trade", were written in the mid 90's.

Ex-cop and ex-Las Vegas stripper Smokey Brandon is now a forensics specialist (CSI) working from the crime lab in Orange County, CA. Her partner, and lover, is Joe Sanders. Smokey's job is to collect, analyze, and preserve the physical evidence from crime scenes. She aids in the solving of horrible murders through meticulus investigation.
She is very good at her job.

This book doesn't have the usual basic buildup to the story. Ayres starts in the middle of the crime scene and you get the full force of what Smokey sees. A young Hispanic woman who was beaten, raped and mutilated. She had been in the country for about six months. Smokey has the edge on the police, she has access to the crime lab and the pathology lab. She notices that some of the Hispanic murders of young men, even though they happen in different parts of the county, are similar.

I liked that the story not only delved into the forensec science but we got to see the softer side of Smokey. She is a bird watcher and volunteers with various cleanup and aid groups. She even has a pet guinea pig.

The characters are very well developed and the murder/thriller plot is very realistic. Ayers paints a vivid picture of the murders and the effect on everyone involved. The added presure to solve several seemingly random cases. It is Smokey who supects that they are connected. When Joe's son, David, contacts her about several of the deceased men she has another decision. Should she trust David and check his suspesions or take him to the Detectives on the case?

I had the Kindle version and listened straight through. Several times I backtracked to check an area or clue. I like to verify facts.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I liked it even though I couldn't connect with the character. April 18 2015
By Autumn Fallen Over Book Reviews - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I received this book via NetGalley to give an honest review. 3.5 stars.
I saw the title of the book and that is what caught my attention I didn't even read the blurb to this book and that is something that I normally don't do. I have to say after reading the blurb I know that Smokey is a female. For the longest time I kept wondering if Smokey was a male or female and though it wasn't a big thing it drove me crazy.
Now I see this book is part of series but it does good as a stand alone so it doesn't seem you miss anything from not reading the previous books.
Smokey is a crime technician and now she is trying to put together the pieces of what connects all these people that seem to be possibly Hispanic. While she is trying to put the puzzle together she also is trying to help out her I believe boyfriend Joe's son David and what he is going through.
David seems to be harboring a secret and when it finally comes out it seems what he knows can help solve who the victims of the crime are.
There is some action not a lot, but the author was very detailed in telling us what was going on. Especially inside the ME's room. I learned some things that I never knew before such as one of them being lighting a paper towel to let the gas be released inside of a body. That was very cool fact to add into the book.
Though the story line was good and I believe I will pick up more books from this author, the character Smokey was not one I connected with. Even though I think the job she has is freaking amazing she felt very flat for me.
I also though the way she would talk to David about his problem that he had going on didn't feel real enough for me. It was like she didn't know what to say to him I suppose? When you read the book the dialogue between them two characters you may know what I mean.
There is some romance but nothing that takes away from the murders or crime solving of what is going on. Nothing is really too gruesome in the book being as there is not graphic detail of the murders but you do get an idea.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Noreen Ayres is a Good Writer March 28 2015
By Paul Dale Anderson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
The Juan Doe Murders by Noreen Ayres. Brash Books.
Great writing right from page one to the end. The Juan Doe Murders is the first book I’ve read by Noreen Ayres, and the third Smokey Brandon forensic mystery. Normally, I’m turned off by first person narratives. But the writing is so wonderfully concise that I couldn’t stop reading. Ayres describes forensic procedures in intimate accurate detail. Her descriptions of evidence collection and the politics of policing is spot-on, and her imagery is faultless. Here’s an example of imagery to die for: “Irvine is a vast, flat, master-planned and virtually antiseptic city so dirt-free you could drop a sandwich, pick it up, and eat it without a thought. A breeze could blow between buildings of the business park where the body was found and not lift a single leaf. It was not a place where you might imagine a man to be sitting against a white wall with a bullet drilled through his head.”
Notice the way her alliteration works? That’s poetry in action.
Ayres mixes narration with realistic dialogue. Not too much of either, just the right mix. Reading The Juan Doe Murders is a pleasure. The story flows effortlessly.
The storyline itself is a hardboiled mystery with plenty of dead bodies. Smokey Brandon is a county-wide crime scene investigator in California. Unidentified Hispanic John Does are turning up all over the place, one right after another. One common denominator is the lack of shell casings at the scene, even when the victim is a supposed suicide. How does one off himself with an automatic and not leave behind a shell casing? Also linking several of the victims is the same name on fake IDs: Hector Rios. And the gun-shot residue on their faces indicates they were each shot up close and personal-like.
What I especially liked about this novel were the details other authors often miss: an ME lighting a paper towel above the victim’s abdomen to ignite and disperse smelly escaping gasses released during the Y-opening at autopsy; behaviors of wild birds and other animals, including bloodhounds and guinea pigs; vivid descriptions of California flora; observations of various ways co-workers interact with one another on a daily basis and when under stress; the intended and unintended complications of interpersonal relationships that mess up innocent lives. Ayres takes her sweet time to tie together a lot of loose ends, and the story’s pace does drag a bit in the middle. But there is enough emotional and sexual tension to hold the reader’s interest as complications abound.
The Juan Doe Murders isn’t a perfect novel, but it is an entertaining and enlightening read. I recommend this book to anyone who loves a good police procedural.
I received an ARC of this title in exchange for a fair review. I loved Ayres writing so much, I bought her other Smoky Brandon titles from Amazon.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Different plot for Orange County April 9 2015
By Paul - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
After one chapter of this mystery I knew this was going to be rough and realistic—at least I wrote a note to that effect—but in the end it wasn’t nearly as gory as that beginning crime scene. And there’s quite a few more murders to investigate, in the not-usual-dead-body areas of Orange County, California.
I was well into the second chapter before realizing—or more likely being told—that the first-person protagonist is a woman, and it didn’t help that she was often referred to as Brandon, which is actually her surname. The twist here is that she’s not a detective, but rather a crime-scene specialist, though in no way does this come across like an episode of CSI. As one might expect from the title, the dead bodies are Hispanic, which leads to a somewhat different take than might be otherwise anticipated.
Halfway through her lover dies. . . or not. . . or maybe. This would have been a useless plotline, except that his son is part of the investigation. At the end she admits she didn’t do anything to really help the investigation, the violent ending having taken away the necessity of arrests and trials.
It wasn’t till I was reading the author blurb at the end that I found out this was the third in a series, but since it never occurred to me, that must mean it can be easily read without the others.
3.5/5 rounded up


Feedback