The Jungle, Literary Touchstone Edition and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading The Jungle, Literary Touchstone Edition on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Jungle (Dover Thrift Editions) [Paperback]

3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (178 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

Book by Sinclair, Upton

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The right version for our time Oct. 1 2006
Format:Paperback
In 1904 the editors of The Appeal to Reason, a Socialist newspaper, gave Upton Sinclair $[...] and sent him to Chicago to write about the meatpacking industry. Sinclair's book, The Jungle, was subsequently published in 1905 in The Appeal and in another socialist magazine, One Hoss Philosophy, both published by J. A. Wayland.

Sinclair also got a contract with Macmillan to publish The Jungle in book form. However, the editors at Macmillan, apparently horrified at the radical nature of some of Sinclair's material, gave Sinclair a list of changes that they wanted him to make in the novel. After Sinclair made the changes, the editors at Macmillian went ahead and cancelled their contract with Sinclair anyway. The circumstances are suspicious, and it seems likely that Macmillan was pressured to drop the novel by the meatpackers.

After Macmillan cancelled its contract, Sinclair approached several other publishers. None of them were interested. Sinclair then decided to ask the readers of The Appeal to send him money for a "Subscribers edition," which he would publish himself, and which (because of the language of the subscription offering and where it appeared) would likely have been the original, uncut version of the novel. (Many 19th-century books were published by subscription, including some of Mark Twain's novels.) It seems likely that this "Subscribers edition" never got beyond the planning stage, because Sinclair didn't raise enough money to publish the book without taking a loss.

Finally, Sinclair obtained a publishing contract from another commercial publisher, Doubleday, Page. According to publisher Frank Doubleday's memoir, published in 1972 after his death, agents for the meatpacking industry threatened to sue Doubleday, Page for $[...
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
By Ronald W. Maron TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
I am quite amused when I read the personal reviews of this book by people who struggle with whether or not Upton Sinclair was truthful or not about the conditions in the Chicago stockyards when he wrote this classical text. Of course he wasn't! This was not meant to be a non-fictional piece nor was it even meant to be a novel of historical fiction. It was meant to be a highly exaggerated, yet concise, piece of allegorical symbolism. By unrealistically expanding on the distraught conditions of not only the stockyards themselves but, more importantly, upon the plight of an immigrant family's interaction with this overwhelming mirage, Sinclair universalizes this tale into one which symbolizes uncontrolled capitalism and the blight which it brings on us all. Yes, 'The Jungle' does produce images of horror and corruption that are nearly unthinkable, but that is the point! Unfettered Capitalism can, and does, produce unbelievable hardship and personal pain on all of its victims and pain that is felt to the same degree that our fictionalized characters experience it! And in spite of what the followers of Ayn Rand, neo-Conservatism and Libertarianism may say, it does so while waving the national flag and calling itself 'freedom'. Sinclair strongly promotes the fact that a civilization is made up of varying peoples and that everyone must be responsible to one another's welfare. From this viewpoint, there cannot be any type of favoritism based on power, wealth, national origin or gender preference as graphically shown in this tale. Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
By James Gallen TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
Having read this as a high school freshman, I decided to take a new look at "The Jungle". "The Jungle", a model of the propongandistic novel, is the tale of Jurgis Rudkus, a Lithuanian immigrant to the Packing house district of Chicago. Written in 1905, it tells the story of Jurgis' working class family which had come to America in search of a better life.
Arriving full of hope, Jurgis sought advancement through a home with the family, the Lithuanian Community, the Church, the industrial machine and politics. Time after time, the naive workman was taken by those whom Upton Sinclair regarded as the oppressors of the people. Every time Jurgis thought that he was a cog in the machine, he ended up being discarded when he was no longer useful to those in whom Jurgis had placed his trust.
Upton Sinclair was disappointed with the results of his book. Intended to win converts to socialism, it was his description of conditions in the packing houses which aided in the enactment of the Pure Food and Drug Act.
"The Jungle" can be appreciated on a number of levels. The action is well paced and holds the reader's interest. As a work of propaganda, it is a model specimen. As an historical insight, it lets the reader into the mind of an early Twentieth Century Socialist reformer. As a report of the life of the early industrial worker, it is entertaining, even if its details are exaggerated for effect. As a political statement, "The Jungle" is in the eyes of the reader. For the true believer, it conveys the truth. For the modern conservative, it is an antiquated and flawed view of the world, which, as time has shown, proposed a remedy which was never right. Which ever camp you fall into, or somewhere in between, "The Jungle" is worth a first, or a second, reading.
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Most recent customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Great book, annoying voice.
I got this audiobook to listen to in the car after listening to "Oil!" and was very excited to get into it, but, the man reading drove me crazy. Read more
Published on March 28 2011 by E. Hall
1.0 out of 5 stars Falsely Marketed Edition
I wrote the below review-article for the History News Network (26 June 2006), and I share it here so that Amazon customers will know the truth about this flawed edition of this... Read more
Published on Aug. 12 2006 by Christopher Phelps
4.0 out of 5 stars Captivating
I really enjoyed this book. Near the end I had more of a struggle to stick with the story. The story just pulls at your heart and I found myself continually shaking my head... Read more
Published on Feb. 24 2004 by Bethanie Frank
4.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful and accurate historical portrayal of immigrants.
This book is a wonderful look into the lives of an immigrant family in the early 1900's. Upton Sinclair was assigned to do an expose on the meatpacking industry in Chicago. Read more
Published on Feb. 17 2004 by "stoner67767"
4.0 out of 5 stars "But I'm glad I'm not a pig!"
Originally published in 1906 by Upton Sinclair, THE JUNGLE sent shockwaves throughout the United States that resulted in cries for labor and agricultural reforms. Read more
Published on Jan. 2 2004 by S. Calhoun
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book!
Too boring? Congrats, you are now part of the machine.
Published on Dec 24 2003 by Leon Phelps
4.0 out of 5 stars Overall
The Jungle was a powerful tale about an immigrating family with high hopes and dreams that come crashing down on them. Read more
Published on Nov. 26 2003 by cori@waterville-valley.sau48.k12.nh.us
4.0 out of 5 stars Cow Tastes Good
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair is a great book. It focuses on the hardships and despair of a family of Lithuanian immigrants, although in the end you're not quite sure what his focus... Read more
Published on Nov. 25 2003 by keith
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Factual Account; Mediocre Novel
Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle," a tale of poverty and politics in early 1900's Chicago has many good and bad facets to it. Read more
Published on Nov. 18 2003 by Dominic
2.0 out of 5 stars The Truth About the American Industrial Revelution
This book is about Jurgis Rudkis, a Lithuanian, who comes to America to get his fortune. Unfortunatly, a series of events leaves him poor and in jail. Read more
Published on Oct. 18 2003 by Christa Coffman
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback