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The Kink Kontroversy [Original recording remastered, Import]

The Kinks Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 19.16 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details


1. Milk Cow Blue
2. Ring the Bells
3. Gotta Get the First Plane Home
4. When I See That Girl of Mine
5. I Am Free
6. Till the End of the Day
7. The World Keeps Going Round
8. I'm On An Island
9. Where Have All The Good Times Gone
10. It's Too Late
11. What's In Store For Me
12. You Can't Win
13. Dedicated Follower of Fashion
14. Sittin' On My Sofa
15. When I See That Girl of Mine
16. Dedicated Follower of Fashion

Product Description

Remastered version of this 1966 gem. Includes Til the End of the Day; You Really Got Me; I'm On An Island, and more! PLUS the original release liner notes by Michael Aldred and new liner notes by Peter Doggett, and four bonus tracks!

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Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars End of the First Era. May 30 2004
Format:Audio CD
The Kinks Kontroversy marks the end of the first hard rocking era of the Kinks; the follow-up album would be produced by Ray Davies himself.
The album is mostly songs in the well-known Kinks-style. All songs except one are selfpenned, and though it is a mixture of rockers and and softer songs, this is probably on of the most hard sounding Kinks albums, which of course has a lot to do with Shel Talmy's production style.
Apart from Estes'"Milk Cow Blues", which I find unnecessary and pretty uninteresting, there are not weak songs here. The single "Till the End of the Day" which was the first Kinks single I bought back in the 60's, is another "You Really Got Me"- rip off; but it's the best of them all. The B-side "I'm on an Island" is another highlight.
There are several indications of the more sophisticated songwriting that was to come. Songs like "Dedicated Follower of Fashion" (bonus-track) and "Where Have All Good Times Gone" show that Ray Davies had already developed as a songwiter both lyrically and musically. The great ballad "Ring the Bells" also shows Davies softer side.
My favourites are "Till the End of the Day", "Ring the Bells", "I'm On an Island", "I Am Free" and "You Can't Win".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The one that always takes the beating! April 25 2004
Format:Audio CD
5 stars? Certainly! This is where a really interesting and important transition for the good of all rockdomhood began. Think about the album that preceeded this one. As you do, realize that after "Milk Cow Blues", this album takes a "you-can-never-go-home-again" direction. Even the song titles tell you that there are important changes happening in the Ray Davies school of song writing. "You Can't Win", "What's in Store for Me", "The World Keeps Going 'Round", "Where Have All the Good Times Gone", "I'm on an Island." Yes, his writing was becoming more introspective and socially concious. Didn't Brian Wilson's writing take the same path and earn him critical acclaim? Of course, the obvious big influence is present. Bob Dylan ("Where Have All the Good Times Gone", "I Am Free") was having a huge impact on almost EVERYONE at that time, from the Beatles to Mr. French! So, why not the Kinks? And in those two songs the influence is indeed felt.
Did you ever notice that on Kink compilation albums this is the album in which the bulk of the material is overlooked? I've never understood this. On this album, Ray's writing had progressed considerably, and their playing had tightened up quite a bit. For proof of this statement, feel the groove of "When I See That Girl of Mine", and "Gotta Get the First Plane Home." And notice how solid Quaife and Avory are on "The World Keeps Going 'Round."
Their next album seemed indeed to be light years away from this one, just as this seemed far removed from "Kinda Kinks." Yet there are important indicators here that signaled the greater things to come. It's content is by no means lame and need not hover in shame when played against their better work.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solid sixties pop triumph Feb. 10 2002
Format:Audio CD
Although the Kinks are most popularly associated with the riff-rock numbers of their early repertoire, and while afficionados endlessly praise the later albums, "Kontroversey" finds the Kinks in a fruitful mid-period. Much like the Beatles 'Rubber Soul' from roughly the same time, the emphasis here is on solidly constructed, folk influenced pop. In case we forget the Kinks are a rock band, however, they dish up plenty of sneering garage-punk on "Till the End of the Day" and "Where have all the Good Times Gone"; but even these numbers reveal a more reflective, plaintive aspect to Ray's lyrics that permeates the mellower tunes on the album; "Ring the Bells" and "The World Keeps Going Round" have an almost Byrds-like grace to them, while revealing Ray's keen skills as an arranger.
The Kinks approach to rock and roll throughout the sixties was always the most working-class, and intensely British when compared to thier peers, and while that individuality does shine here, this is probably one of their most accesible albums.
The production and remastering only make it more so, as "Kontroversey" does not suffer the somewhat tinny quality of most of the Kinks re-issues from this decade.
This is not the Kinks most revolutionary stuff - check out "Village Green" or "Something Else" if you like this album and want to hear more complex songwriting and adventerous arrangments; check out "Kinks Kontroversey" if you want proof that simplicity is sometimes just as effective.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  16 reviews
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The End of Something May 30 2005
By Up The Stairs - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I love this album. I originally bought it in the mid-60s when it came out, featuring the last of the Kinks' power-chord singles, "Till The End of the Day." I immediately loved "Milk Cow Blues," and it became my favorite cut on the album. But Kontroversy has many gems, "I'm On An Island," "I Am Free," , and "I Gotta Get The First Plane Home" are all fun and nifty tunes. It isn't, however, their best effort during the initial stage of their career. Kink Kinkdom easily outshines it probably because it has stronger material.

Actually, Kontroversy is an intersting release because it is almost a step back for Ray Davies' writing style. In Kinkdom and Kinda Kinks, Ray had explored social issues with some depth. Although the American albums were mix-matches of several British releases, Kontroversy was released in the U.S. and British in very similar set-ups. By the time Kontroversy had been released, Ray had written and released "Well Respected Man" and "See My Friends," both not only completely different sounds for the Kinks, but lyrically very interesting. So, why did Ray revert to catchy pop tunes?

Nonetheless, I really enjoy listening to Kink Kontroversy, and I find it to be a fun way to get back to the 60's. Lots of power, lots of power chording, and lots of catchy lyrics. It was definitely the last time The Kinks would release such an album, and it serves us all well, even today.
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Solid sixties pop triumph Feb. 10 2002
By OperablePig - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Although the Kinks are most popularly associated with the riff-rock numbers of their early repertoire, and while afficionados endlessly praise the later albums, "Kontroversey" finds the Kinks in a fruitful mid-period. Much like the Beatles 'Rubber Soul' from roughly the same time, the emphasis here is on solidly constructed, folk influenced pop. In case we forget the Kinks are a rock band, however, they dish up plenty of sneering garage-punk on "Till the End of the Day" and "Where have all the Good Times Gone"; but even these numbers reveal a more reflective, plaintive aspect to Ray's lyrics that permeates the mellower tunes on the album; "Ring the Bells" and "The World Keeps Going Round" have an almost Byrds-like grace to them, while revealing Ray's keen skills as an arranger.
The Kinks approach to rock and roll throughout the sixties was always the most working-class, and intensely British when compared to thier peers, and while that individuality does shine here, this is probably one of their most accesible albums.
The production and remastering only make it more so, as "Kontroversey" does not suffer the somewhat tinny quality of most of the Kinks re-issues from this decade.
This is not the Kinks most revolutionary stuff - check out "Village Green" or "Something Else" if you like this album and want to hear more complex songwriting and adventerous arrangments; check out "Kinks Kontroversey" if you want proof that simplicity is sometimes just as effective.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars End of the First Era. May 30 2004
By Morten Vindberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The Kinks Kontroversy marks the end of the first hard rocking era of the Kinks; the follow-up album would be produced by Ray Davies himself.
The album is mostly songs in the well-known Kinks-style. All songs except one are selfpenned, and though it is a mixture of rockers and and softer songs, this is probably on of the most hard sounding Kinks albums, which of course has a lot to do with Shel Talmy`s production style.
Apart from Estes`"Milk Cow Blues", which I find unnecessary and pretty uninteresting, there are not weak songs here. The single "Till the End of the Day" which was the first Kinks single I bought back in the 60`s, is another "You Really Got Me"- rip off; but it`s the best of them all. The B-side "I`m on an Island" is another highlight.
There are several indications of the more sophisticated songwriting that was to come. Songs like "Dedicated Follower of Fashion" (bonus-track) and "Where Have All Good Times Gone" show that Ray Davies had already developed as a songwiter both lyrically and musically. The great ballad "Ring the Bells" also shows Davies softer side.
My favourites are "Till the End of the Day", "Ring the Bells", "I`m On an Island", "I Am Free" and "You Can`t Win".
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The one that always takes the beating! April 25 2004
By Nathan Laney - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
5 stars? Certainly! This is where a really interesting and important transition for the good of all rockdomhood began. Think about the album that preceeded this one. As you do, realize that after "Milk Cow Blues," this album takes a "you-can-never-go-home-again" direction. Even the song titles tell you that there are important changes happening in the Ray Davies school of song writing. "You Can't Win," "What's in Store for Me," "The World Keeps Going 'Round," "Where Have All the Good Times Gone," "I'm on an Island." Yes, his writing was becoming more introspective and socially concious. Didn't Brian Wilson's writing take the same path and earn him critical acclaim? Of course, the obvious big influence is present. Bob Dylan ("Where Have All the Good Times Gone," "I Am Free") was having a huge impact on almost EVERYONE at that time, from the Beatles to Mr. French! So, why not the Kinks? And in those two songs the influence is indeed felt.
Did you ever notice that on Kink compilation albums this is the album in which the bulk of the material is overlooked? I've never understood this. On this album, Ray's writing had progressed considerably, and their playing had tightened up quite a bit. For proof of this statement, feel the groove of "When I See That Girl of Mine," and "Gotta Get the First Plane Home." And notice how solid Quaife and Avory are on "The World Keeps Going 'Round."
Their next album seemed indeed to be light years away from this one, just as this seemed far removed from "Kinda Kinks." Yet there are important indicators here that signaled the greater things to come. It's content is by no means lame and need not hover in shame when played against their better work. If the Kinks had disbanded at this point, tons of people would revere this album as a sign of what could have been and this could have possibly become a classic. Thank goodness that didn't happen though! It occupies a unique place in the Kinks recorded legacy, and when judged on it's own you have to agree that this is a five star album.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No Longer a Singles Band April 10 2008
By Frank A. Kocher - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I bought this one as a teenager the day it came out, and played the grooves off of it, as I did ever other Kinks LP until 1970. The difference with 'Kontroversy' is that the non-single cuts, which were for the most part quickly tossed together afterthoughts on the first two LPs, show real development of Ray Davies into the songwriter who would further blossom on the three masterpieces to follow. The lyrics are introspective on 'I'm on an Island' and take a look at society on 'Where Have All the Good Times Gone'. This is a rock'n'roll record-in the cover of 'Milk Cow Blues', 'You Can't Win', and 'It's Too Late', the latter pounding hard with acoustic guitar and keyboards rather than the overdriven electric guitar of the early singles, and repeated to lesser effect on the churning 'Til the End of the Day'. This album shows a band in transition, and while there are a couple of cuts that are forgettable the growth in songwriting and more complex arrangements is a sign of great things to come.
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