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The Leader's Handbook: Making Things Happen, Getting Things Done Spiral-bound – Dec 1 1997


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Product Details

  • Spiral-bound: 415 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (Dec 1 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0070580286
  • ISBN-13: 978-0070580282
  • Product Dimensions: 23.5 x 20.9 x 3.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 862 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #184,439 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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First Sentence
On October 5, 1841, two Western Railroad passenger trains collided head-on somewhere between Worcester, Massachusetts and Albany, New York, killing a conductor and a passenger and injuring seventeen passengers. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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By Desi Mou on Aug. 2 2013
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
I'd love to write a review for this book but the truth is that I was never able to get through even a substantial portion of it and I've had it a while now. I love the topics but I'm having trouble chewing through some of the text - I can't tell if it's that, or just that the size of it entire book is intimidating....

Perhaps it'll just be something I dip into every few years for something to think about.

Given that it's called Making Things Happen, Getting Things Done, I feel a bit bad about all of this, but it's the absolute truth.
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Format: Spiral-bound
Scholtes expects to shock people right from the first page of his Preface. Let me quote extensively:
"More than 95 percent of your organization's problems derive from your systems, processes, and methods, not from your individual workers....

We look to the heroic efforts of outstanding individuals for our successful work. Instead we must create systems that routinely allow excellent work to result from the ordinary efforts of ordinary people.

Changing the system will change what people do. Changing what people do will not change the system.

Certain common management approaches--management by objectives, performance appraisal, merit pay, pay for performance, and ISO 9000--represent not leadership but the abdication of leadership.

Current buzzwords like empowerment, accountability, and high performance are meaningless, empty babble..." (ix-x)

The old organizations's leaders need: forcefulness, ability to motivate and inspire, decisiveness, willfulness, assertiveness, result- and bottom-line orientation, being task-oriented and having integrity and diplomacy.

Scholtes' new leadership competencies (much influenced by Edward Deming's ideas...) are based on a new mentality and understanding of: systems thinking, variability of work, how we learn, psychology and human behavior, interactions of these components, and vision, meaning, direction and focus.

The bulk of the book gives clear elaborations of these new competencies, with charts, illustrations, pertinent questions and many tools. Ch. 4 on "Getting the Daily Work Done" is a tough one, partly because it takes much effort to grasp the author's use of a Japanese term, "Gemba" (even when I can read the original Chinese characters).
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By A Customer on Aug. 8 2000
Format: Spiral-bound
Being a disciple of W. Edwards Demming, Peter Scholtes has a quality department's process bias; emphasizing systems, processes and statistics. Was I reading another new age quality assurance textbook? Because of this, I felt he overemphasized the present moment. True leaders are going places and have many loyal followers. The book rarely talks about this visionary thinking or how effective organizations are moving into new areas. This is a good book for beginners as long as you're aware he presents a different viewpoint, and because of this, he did bring some useful ideas that other books didn't have. Ironically, he openly admits that you may not agree with some of his viewpoints.
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By Raymond A. Teo on Feb. 29 2000
Format: Spiral-bound
Having attended one of his talks, I gathered this book to be condensed from Scholtes' personal experience and practical knowledge which can also be seen in his "Teams" predecessor. A functional manual covering leadership in all aspects, with its depths and substance manifested in simple and easy to follow guidelines.
An ideal recommendation for any modern manager.
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