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The C. S. Lewis Space Trilogy-3-Copy Boxed Set Paperback – Jun 1996


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Simon and Schuster; Box edition (June 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 068483118X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684831183
  • Product Dimensions: 18.3 x 11 x 5.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 476 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #733,278 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Steven R. McEvoy HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on Sept. 11 2006
Format: Paperback
This is the first book in C.S. Lewis's amazing Space Trilogy. These books are far less known than Lewis's Narnia series or even his Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters, yet it is just as good as any of those writings and goes to show the versatility of Lewis as an author.

This first book begins with our hero, Dr. Ransom, out for a walking tour in the countryside, dressed in that shabby way for which professors are renowned. His foes are his former schoolmates Devine and Weston. These men believe they need a human sacrifice, and by capturing Ransom they have their victim, for they have made a spaceship and are taking Ransom to Malacandra the red planet.

Once on Mars, Ransom escapes his captors, meets many species, and finds out that on Mars there has been no "fall" and Ransom from Earth or the Silent Planet is a bit of an oddity. People from earth are considered to be "bent" in nature, from the original sin of the fall.

Follow Ransom as he treks across a strange world, and must find the courage to risk it all to save not only an alien race, but also, possibly his own soul.

This is a first book in an amazing series. Try it - you won't be disappointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven R. McEvoy HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on Sept. 11 2006
Format: Paperback
Out of the Silent Planet
C.S. Lewis

This is the first book in C.S. Lewis's amazing Space Trilogy. These books are far less known than Lewis's Narnia series or even his Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters, yet it is just as good as any of those writings and goes to show the versatility of Lewis as an author.

This first book begins with our hero, Dr. Ransom, out for a walking tour in the countryside, dressed in that shabby way for which professors are renowned. His foes are his former schoolmates Devine and Weston. These men believe they need a human sacrifice, and by capturing Ransom they have their victim, for they have made a spaceship and are taking Ransom to Malacandra the red planet.

Once on Mars, Ransom escapes his captors, meets many species, and finds out that on Mars there has been no "fall" and Ransom from Earth or the Silent Planet is a bit of an oddity. People from earth are considered to be "bent" in nature, from the original sin of the fall.

Follow Ransom as he treks across a strange world, and must find the courage to risk it all to save not only an alien race, but also, possibly his own soul.

This is a first book in an amazing series. Try it - you won't be disappointed.

Perelandra
C.S. Lewis

This is the second book in C.S. Lewis's amazing Space Trilogy. This book was written as a sequel to the immensely popular Out of the Silent Planet but Lewis also wrote it so that the story can stand on its own. So if you haven't read the first you can start here.

This book takes place some time after the first, but we are not sure how long. Ransom has received a summons to Venus, a planet that is just beginning its inhabited life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bc on Nov. 24 2001
Format: Paperback
I admire C.S. Lewis for his writings on Christianity, but anyone trying to writing Christian sci-fi novels is stretching the line of interest (or at least mine). The plotline is horrible. Thank goodness this was a short book. I would have quit at about Chapter 7 if I wouldn't have had tests on it. No offense Clive but this is definitely not your best work. I am also not enthralled that I will have to read the other 2 books of the trilogy. If you're looking for a good one of Lewis' works, read "Screwtape Letters" or "Mere Christianity."
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By A. Miller on May 28 2002
Format: Paperback
If one is likely to read and love C.S.Lewis' The Chronicles of Narnia, one cannot help but be equally satisfied, and in some ways more, with this book and the other two in the Space Trilogy (Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength). This book is told about a Dr. Ransom who is taken captive by two aquaintances (Weston and Divine)on Earth and flown by spaceship to Malacandra. It is here where Ransom flees with fear of what may happen to him in his captive's hands and their motives. Along the way he meets the most intreaging of creatures on the planet who will both pull you in and take you away. Wonderfully described and portrayed, C.S.Lewis gives the reader a gift of traveling to a new world full of seroni, hrossa, etc. Allowing for readers with an open mind, to learn and ponder new thoughts and ideas. Ransom through his stay on the planet, learns to face his fears and become a better human being while respecting the differences in others who are unlike himself. The characters and story are unforgetable. I highly recomend this book, and I can assure you will not be hesitant to pick up the second when through.
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Format: Paperback
This is the great lay-theologian's foray into sci-fi, first published in 1938. I mention that date, because this book does not resemble much current "science fiction." It's definitely fiction... but not very scientific. For instance, Lewis avoids explaining any technical problems in how these characters actually leave Earth's atmosphere (or return). What is the source of propulsion? Nowadays, a 7-year-old reader would get bogged down in the first few pages, realizing that everyone would be burnt to a crisp in the homemade space-contraption Lewis blithely hurtles them off in.
That being said... the book is still a gem.
It begins with Dr. Elwin Ransom (a middle-aged Philologist from Cambridge University) being kidnapped by two men, Dick Devine and Dr. Weston, the latter being a mad physicist who wants to extend humanity to other planets. At first, Ransom is excited with this journey to Malacandra (Mars)... until he overhears that he is going to be offered as a sacrifice to the space-creatures called "sorns." Devine and Weston have been to Malacandra before, and have convinced themselves that a human sacrifice is recquired by the sorns, in return for the right to exploit the planet's gold deposits.
Upon arrival, Ransom escapes... beginning a conflict that lasts the length of the book and extends to its sequel "Perelandra."
In this colorful novel, Lewis explores many DEEP themes... the primary one being that, if there is life on another planet, there is no need for us to assume that it is in a "fallen" state, or filled with wickedness, or in need of redemption, as our own is. If we reached other planets we might find a race which was, like us, rational but, unlike us, innocent - having no wars nor any other wickedness among them.
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