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The Lost Work of Stephen King: Complete & Uncut Signed Hardcover – Aug 1 1998


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Hardcover, Aug 1 1998
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Overlook Connection Pr; Limited edition (August 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1892950030
  • ISBN-13: 978-1892950031
  • Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 15.2 x 3.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 862 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
This book does not contain any complete work by Stephen King, but it explores many texts or other works that are little known and that are at times difficult to find. It sums up the texts, works, stories, etc, gives the starting line and at times the punch line, analyzes these works and evaluates the chances one may have to get them. Some of these works are nowadays more readily available than said in the book. It is the case of « L.T.'s Theory of Pets » that has been published in an audio cassette version as read by Stephen King himself in London in 1998 (Stephen King Live !, 1999) or of « Lunch at the Gotham Café » read by the author and published in the form of a CD audiobook (Blood and Smoke, 2000). This book gives some insight on how Stephen King works by exemplifying working or alternative versions of some books we know, and by also covering some rare pieces that show how adventurous and compulsive a writer he may be. I particularly appreciate the column he has in The Maine Campus from february 1969 to may 1970. A must, in other words, for the students of Stephen King's works, the Stephen King literate and the Stephen King lovers. Dr Jacques COULARDEAU, Paris Universities II and IX.
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Format: Hardcover
SHORT: Fans only, I'd say. For them it may be essential, although the writing style is probably offputting for some. LONG: I found this book quite entertaining due to its contents. (Remember that the "complete" SK encyclopedia by the same author a couple of years back was largely confined to fiction.) Spignesi traces many items in the King universe that are obscure and difficult (impossible in some cases) to obtain. If you want to read about rare newspaper appearances, juvenilia, crosswords, and the like (i.e., if you're a die-hard King fanatic like me), you'll probably want to buy this book - although Tyson Blue covered a fair amount of the rare stuff until 1989 in his UNSEEN KING (starmont). I have to say, though, that I find Spignesi's style of writing, like that of Blue earlier, a little off-putting. It is clear that he is enthusiastic about King and his work, ephemeral as some of the pieces discussed in this book may sometimes be. But there is a line, I think, between unobtrusive and still informative prose (like that of Winter and Collings, who write a carefully measured prose but are still fun to read) and a style that may at best be described as chatty and informal, at worst as annoying fannish hyperbole. The more's the pity since this book could have been so much more - if you're looking for critical discussions that go beyond the superficial, I guess you better stick with the many works of Collings. With a subject matter like this it's inevitable that some customers may be disappointed not to actually get to read some of these "oddities," but with the help of the internet it is possible to collect rare King texts, at least, on a beer budget. And then there is, of course, the BOMC collection SECRET WINDOWS, where you might start to gather a couple of rare pieces. All in all, I'd rank it 3 out of 5.
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By A Customer on Sept. 10 1999
Format: Hardcover
A very interesting book. I am rereading now actually
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Well, it's for fans, innit March 11 2001
By Karsten Runge - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
SHORT: Fans only, I'd say. For them it may be essential, although the writing style is probably offputting for some. LONG: I found this book quite entertaining due to its contents. (Remember that the "complete" SK encyclopedia by the same author a couple of years back was largely confined to fiction.) Spignesi traces many items in the King universe that are obscure and difficult (impossible in some cases) to obtain. If you want to read about rare newspaper appearances, juvenilia, crosswords, and the like (i.e., if you're a die-hard King fanatic like me), you'll probably want to buy this book - although Tyson Blue covered a fair amount of the rare stuff until 1989 in his UNSEEN KING (starmont). I have to say, though, that I find Spignesi's style of writing, like that of Blue earlier, a little off-putting. It is clear that he is enthusiastic about King and his work, ephemeral as some of the pieces discussed in this book may sometimes be. But there is a line, I think, between unobtrusive and still informative prose (like that of Winter and Collings, who write a carefully measured prose but are still fun to read) and a style that may at best be described as chatty and informal, at worst as annoying fannish hyperbole. The more's the pity since this book could have been so much more - if you're looking for critical discussions that go beyond the superficial, I guess you better stick with the many works of Collings. With a subject matter like this it's inevitable that some customers may be disappointed not to actually get to read some of these "oddities," but with the help of the internet it is possible to collect rare King texts, at least, on a beer budget. And then there is, of course, the BOMC collection SECRET WINDOWS, where you might start to gather a couple of rare pieces. All in all, I'd rank it 3 out of 5.
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
A useful book about the working method of the Maestro June 16 2001
By Jacques COULARDEAU - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book does not contain any complete work by Stephen King, but it explores many texts or other works that are little known and that are at times difficult to find. It sums up the texts, works, stories, etc, gives the starting line and at times the punch line, analyzes these works and evaluates the chances one may have to get them. Some of these works are nowadays more readily available than said in the book. It is the case of « L.T.'s Theory of Pets » that has been published in an audio cassette version as read by Stephen King himself in London in 1998 (Stephen King Live !, 1999) or of « Lunch at the Gotham Café » read by the author and published in the form of a CD audiobook (Blood and Smoke, 2000). This book gives some insight on how Stephen King works by exemplifying working or alternative versions of some books we know, and by also covering some rare pieces that show how adventurous and compulsive a writer he may be. I particularly appreciate the column he has in The Maine Campus from february 1969 to may 1970. A must, in other words, for the students of Stephen King's works, the Stephen King literate and the Stephen King lovers. Dr Jacques COULARDEAU, Paris Universities II and IX.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
take a peek at the boy king Sept. 10 2004
By Kimberley Wilson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Stephen Spignesi worte the Stephen King Encylopedia, a book I still read a couple of times a month. He knows his subject and is rather talented as a writer himself. If you've seen the encyclopedia then you've read excerpts of King's immature work. This book concentrates on the lost works : the material King did as a raw kid (This isn't a put down. King's youthful stuff shows that even then he had gift)but don't forget that this is all material that he chose not to publsih or stuck in a drawer somewhere.

The Lost Work is really for totally devoted fans, the people who will buy anything that has King's name on it or in it. The rest of us probably won't be as enamored.
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Here's an example of a good thing done poorly... Nov. 9 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Don't be mislead, this is signed by the editor and staff, not Mr. King. In addition, it is a low quality publication with very poor print quality. Don't get me wrong, if you're a fan of Stephen King, especially works like "Danse Macabre", then this is probably a must have. It also makes a good conversation piece or book club discussion material. But if you're a fan of his stories and are looking for something to read and enjoy, then you would fare better with one of his short story collections.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Fabulous, Authoritative! Nov. 20 1999
By Wayne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Of all the works I have collected by/on/about King, this is one of the best documentations of his early, unpublished work! Thank You, Amazon!

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