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The Lynmara Legacy Paperback – 1975


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Paperback, 1975

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Amazon.com: 5 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Previously This Other Eden Sept. 15 2010
By L Murphy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Gaskin previously write this 30 years before under the title This Other Eden, she has referred to 'This Other Eden' as the Skeleton of this book.

Ive noticed that in the first books that Gaskin wrote the characters were not always very likable, in her later books shes developed the characters more and in this book she's went into far more detail than she did previously with 'This other Eden'.

This story starts out where we meet Russian Anna and her daughter Nicole living in America. Anna wants everything she never had for her daughter and Nicole does everything she can to make Anna proud of her. When Nicole's English grandfather die's his will changes Anna and Nicole's live for ever.

The story goes through Nicole's whole life and how she survived during world war 2. I enjoyed this.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Bad Aftertaste Aug. 2 2014
By Ancient Bookworm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This elderly novel is interesting to read, if you don't mind heaps of coincidences, and I enjoyed it first many years ago, but even then it always left me with a bad aftertaste, which has increased with age.

Anna, a beautiful young Russian girl and a talented pianist, has to leave old Russia when the empire starts to break up. She goes to England, has a classic "great romance" with a British aristocrat, is rejected by him, and ends up in New York as a widow with one daughter, having married a kind young Englishman who is killed in WWI. Interesting story so far!

The problem is that Ms. Gaskin picks the wrong heroine to focus her novel on. It begins with and centers on the adventures of Nicole, Anna's daughter, whose narcissism, perpetual discontent, and need to punish others make her an unattractive figure. We meet her as an adolescent when she finally figures out that her mother actually has a life of her own, earning money to keep them both alive, and to keep Nicole in a fancy boarding school away from the slum Anna pretends to live in. Anna finally reveals her secret life to Nicole. She also accuses Nicole of being a snob and alludes indirectly to Nicole's selfishness. Nicole is given a chance to display both traits when the wealthy in-laws of her father summon her to England to be a debutant. Anna bows out of her daughter's life.

The rest of this complicated novel gives us brief glimpses of Anna, who, at the age of a grandmother, moves to L. A., learns to be a secretary and real estate agent, and supports herself, even buying and learning how to drive a pre-WWII Ford! However, the story is fully focused on Nicole, who kvetches, poses, and manipulates her way through pampered Aristocratic British life, playing the tease with all the "eligible" young men she can find. She complains about her beautifully redecorated bedroom because it is pink, which color she doesn't like. She complains about the delicious meals she has, because they do not have enough variety. She wants to be babied and taken care of, and for a time she is, but that ends, and she must look elsewhere for satisfaction.

The ending of the long book shows Nicole' success in finding and keeping her real true love, the magnificent historic estate named--you guessed it--Lynmara! She is still kvetching because her children want her to sell it, but she's fooled them, and she's taken her revenge on many other people as well. We hear only briefly, mostly off-stage, of Anna's solid, hard-won happiness.

Many Lady novelists besides Ms. Gaskin portray houses as more important, and easier to love, than people--Du Maurier's "Rebecca" shows the most famous example of of the erotic mansion--but I don't find that theme appealing. In defense of Ms. Gaskin, even she seems to find her heroine's behavior odd, and in one of her other novels, "Blake's Reach," she goes out of her way to show that human love is more important than lust for antique roofs and marble halls.
I have adored and re-read this novel over the last 30 years July 3 2014
By Kindle Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the great, all time romanctic novels. Gaskin is a wonderful writer, very like Mary Stewart, another great romantic author, in terms of atmosphere, plot and character.
Lucciella
Fabulous! April 15 2014
By Sandra Wehrly - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I have had this book for years and it is one of my favorites. Right up there with Rebecca. It is a wonderful story and I have probably read dozens and dozens of times. I love it.
Wonderful book Sept. 9 2013
By JJ - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I recently discovered that I had held onto this book for probably 40 years. I had read it several times then it got lost under some stuff for years. Recently found it and read it again and it is just such a good book. A wonderful read. I won't let it get lost again for sure.

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