Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage pinata Kindle Music Deals Store Kitchen Cycling Tools minions
THE MYSTERIOUS STRANGER (non illustrated) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Mysterious Stranger has been added to your Cart
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Moderate wear on cover and edges. Minimal highlighting and/or other markings can be present. May be ex-library copy and may not include CD, Accessories and/or Dust Cover. Good readable copy.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Mysterious Stranger Paperback – Sep 1 1995


See all 40 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, Sep 1 1995
CDN$ 13.00
CDN$ 13.00 CDN$ 3.49

Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student




Product Details

  • Paperback: 121 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books (Sept. 1 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573920398
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573920391
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 0.7 x 21.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #277,867 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 - April 21, 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called "The Great American Novel". Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which provided the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. After an apprenticeship with a printer, he worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to the newspaper of his older brother, Orion Clemens. He later became a riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River before heading west to join Orion in Nevada. In 1865, his humorous story, "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County", was published, based on a story he heard at Angels Hotel in Angels Camp, California, where he had spent some time as a miner. The short story brought international attention, and was even translated into classic Greek. He is called as "the father of American literature". --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Mark Twain, in his advancing years, no longer relied solely on telling tales about adventuresome lads paddling down streaming rivers. Instead, he spent his efforts examining parts of life that were, and remain to be, sacrosanct to society. Politics, wealth and religion were his primary targets.

In the short story called "The Mysterious Stranger" he challenges fundamentalists from all eras to examine the tenets which form their belief system. In a simple dialogue between a young boy and Satan, he lays bare the faith to which we, as a Christian-reared culture, have been led to not only believe but to vigorously defend against unbelievers and even on the death-strewn battlefield. In the end, Twain reveals that he, himself is an atheist and, being so will have none of the fairy tales that society puts forth!

The worth of this book lies not in Twain's proselytization of us towards his form of unbelief. Rather, it is in the opportunity he presents to truly examine what we do have faith in, to discard the inane, and to repackage a belief system that is based on truth and reality rather than based on poems and illusions. Those of us who are unable to do this and adamantly hold onto that which we have inherited are the true losers of this challenge. For they, like our boyish hero, will be left breathless when, and if, the actual truth is eventually revealed.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on March 18 1999
Format: Paperback
I, having read Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer, picked up "No. 44, The Mysterious Stranger" expecting yet another light-hearted romp.
I got a masterpiece instead.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Brock H. on July 4 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Simple book, no introductions, or post script notes, if you're okay with that. Awesome novella, definitely worth the read.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By "whitecloudlincoln" on Jan. 31 2001
Format: Paperback
In The Mysterious Straqnger complete manuscript, that includes rough draft and complete unedited notes, Mark Twain predicted World War I. Mark Twain died in 1910. World War I started in 1914.Mark Twain states that Germany was targeted for destruction because it as a nieve country, living in the age of faith, when the rest of the world was living in the age of reason.Mark Twain repeatedly mentions Father Adolph, and Marx.Mark Twain stated that a few rich bankers headquartered in the U.S.A. started World War I.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Feb. 27 1998
Format: Paperback
Twain's bitter edge kept getting sharper and sharper as he grew older, till finally only the bitterness was left. "The Mysterious Stranger" was his last work, and Twain is full-bore in his hatred of man, God, and everything in between. He was so intent on spilling his bile that he didn't even bother to come up with an ending, which is one of the most sophomoric I've ever seen; Heinlein would say it's equivalent to ending a book by writing "and the little boy fell out of bed and woke up." It's a shame that Twain's writing should be forever tarnished by this final piece of literary drudge, a book so bad only English majors and prison inmates are consigned to reading it. Read some of his earlier work instead (e.g., "Innocents Abroad").
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.


Feedback