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The Narrows Hardcover – Large Print, May 3 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company (May 3 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316000736
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316000734
  • Product Dimensions: 24 x 16 x 4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 635 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (87 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #46,566 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on June 30 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I find mysteries about clever serial killers to be especially satisfying. The sub-genre often features a killer who is stalking the police, and that's exactly what happens in The Narrows as an ex-FBI agent, Robert Backus (aka The Poet), tracks his ex-protégée, Rachel Walling, in a sequel to the non-Bosch book, The Poet.

Harry Bosch had worked homicide with LAPD for what seemed like a lifetime until he resigned after much frustration with police politics in City of Bones. Now, Harry is a private detective with a lot of time on his hands.

Harry's life has a new direction after learning at the end of Lost Light that he is the father of four-year-old Maddie by his ex-wife, Eleanor Wish. Eleanor enjoys earning a living as a high-stakes poker player in Las Vegas, and doesn't enjoy Harry's company all that much. Harry is trying to split his time between LA and Lost Wages, but is feeling drawn to the southwest more and more.

Harry stumbles into the serial murder investigation after looking into the suspicious death of an ex-partner whose heart medicine was tampered with. Naturally, the FBI wants him out of their hair . . . but Harry is always at least one step ahead of them. With a clever killer tweaking their curiosity, can Harry hope to survive between the twin anvils of a deadly murderer and the heavy-handed bureaucracy?

Because of the serial killing aspect, the book has a pace and beat that aren't always present in the Harry Bosch novels. This story built up nicely into an exciting ending that made this book qualify more as a thriller than as a detective story.

I haven't read The Poet, and I followed this story just fine. I have no idea how you will feel about this book if you did or didn't like The Poet.

Very nice!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donette on March 20 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Robert Backus, former FBI agent turned serial killer who calls himself the Poet, is back, targeting FBI agent Rachel Walling. Harry Bosch gets into the action when he is asked to investigate the possible homicide of his friend, Terry McCaleb. Bosch begins going through McCaleb's files and finds information that leads him to the Poet. Together, Walling and Bosch join forces, against the FBI's wishes, and do their own investigating.
Conelly's switch from first to third person throughout the book was a little distracting at first, but once I got used to it, I grew to like the style. Bosch seems like an old friend, and Connelly manages to keep the character interesting and fresh. Loved the connection Bosch has to his small daughter and the feelings he expresses about her.
Another great book by Connelly.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Good crime story and I like Bosch but I felt too much time on his family matters and ending sort of ridiculous. Who keeps a spare tire not bolted down especially in a Mercedes SUV and on top of jumper cables?
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By Brenda Mason on June 3 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am a Michael Connelly addict. I just stumbled upon this author by accident but from the first book I read I was hooked. The main character is just a stand up cop and he always gets his man or woman! :-)
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By John-78 on July 18 2004
Format: Hardcover
This was my first book by the author and for me it was a good read. I'd recommend this to anyone who likes good page-turning suspense. I wasn't aware this was the latest of a series, but that didn't bother me. Some of the plot development towards the end didn't garner four star ratings, but the writer is so good at what he does I could see myself re-reading this book in the future. I'd put this on the same level as James Patterson "1st To Die" Very Good!
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Format: Hardcover
1) Tries to group all past characters and plots from past novels but it seems more like a contrivance to poke fun at Hollywood.
2) Author is usually terrific at making his books feel like they were conceived and written in one burst of energy, but this is more like a smorgasbord of ideas rather than a nice dinner.
3) Much of the book reads quickly.
4) Ending is exciting
5) Bosch does some decent detective work at the end...although it seems he's a little more lucky than he is smart.
6) FBI is still stereotyped as a bunch of media-hungry morons...if that's really true, it hasn't been presented with any originality.
7) I will still look forward to Connelly's next book...as always.
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By Michael Butts on July 7 2004
Format: Hardcover
Alright, THE NARROWS once again proves why Michael Connelly is so successful. With an eye for narrative flow (both in first and third person), and a deep understanding of his characters (not always likeable), he continues to mesmerize. But isn't anybody else out there bothered by this novel's biggest flaw: we STILL don't know why Robert Backus (aka THE POET) killed all those homicide detectives in the THE POET. And now he's back and killing again, but with no real reason for these murders either. There is a slight mention of Backus' stern father and apathetic mother, so we understand perhaps why he's a serial killer, but Connelly let me down by not explaining the why of his victims. Connelly also should have brought Jack McEvoy back, as he was the real hero in THE POET.
Instead, we get the irrepressible Harry Bosch, hero of many of Connelly's books, paired with FBI agent Rachel Walling, who was a key player in THE POET. Connelly wisely uses the media again in that in this book they mention quite often the movie BLOOD WORK, which is based on Connelly's own novel, revolving around the heart-transplanted cop Terry McCabe. Buddy Longbridge's reference to Jeff Daniels' interpretation of his character is slyly brilliant. Which is a shame..Connelly is brilliant, and this book certainly entertains. I just wish I could understand why Connelly has let something so important be taken for granted without any supporting narrative evidence. Maybe we'll get it again? Anyway, definitely a must for fans, but if you're a new reader, you may be let down a little too.
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