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The Night Of Four Hundred Rabbits Paperback – Feb 14 2002

2.7 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Avon; Reprint edition (Feb. 14 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380731207
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380731206
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.3 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 45 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,628,567 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

About the Author

Elizabeth Peters earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. In 2003, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Malice Domestic Convention. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.


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I wish some university, somewhere, offered a course in survival. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
I’m shocked such easy dynamics for an adventure were squandered on drugs. This was as disinteresting as could be; a waste of setting. It is scarcely about Carol’s father. We wonder where he stood in the equation and whether a relationship were possible but that stood at a distant sideline. Every scene was about a boyfriend keen for marijuana. The single shred of belated adventure comes from pursuing cheesy villains. It had little to do with pyramids or México. It could occur anywhere.

If it were well-plotted or I cared for any character at all beyond the protagonist; perhaps I could have enjoyed this story. However as a writer, I couldn't deny it was awful and didn’t take the direction described. This was a stilted, YA-toned relationship novel. I love older settings. A novel of 1971 should show age. Old settings preserve worthwhile snapshots. Unsuccessfully, Barbara festoon her story with hip scenarios, forcing modern buzzwords into all dialogue. This might have been a health class pep talk film, rather than the Indiana Jones quest to which we thought we were sitting down.

I see merit in any worthwhile grain. I would praise this novel with stars everywhere they were due. Excepting happy closing moments and comical quips on the part of the intelligent Carol; there were slim scrapings. Extraneous narrating dragged on, even before reaching the family plotline advertised. The novel was unfocused, we can't stand Danny, and I loathe the topic of drugs. The motive revealed, for summoning Carol to México, was the most poorly made-up I’ve ever seen. This is an early effort. Don't introduce new readers with this. We know Barbara does much better. Even the happy picture of dear rabbits was overrun by narcotics. That term measures being drunk or drugged. Four-hundred rabbits is maximum inebriation.
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By A Customer on Aug. 28 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Elizabeth Peters is a great writer of mysteries. Most of her books have a terrific mixture of lighthearted style, tricky puzzles, exotic settings, and characters endowed with personality. I almost always enjoy their interactions. Four Hundred Rabbits was written in the early 70s, and the protagonist is still something of a stereotypical helpless woman--understandable for its time, but not so great when you compare her to the protagonists in Ms. Peters' later books (especially the Amelia Peabody mysteries). However, what really disappointed me was the shallowness of secondary characters, and the relationships among the characters. In 400 Rabbits, there's a murkiness in the relationships that doesn't feel mysterious, just not carefully thought out. The voices don't sound as real as usual.
Of course, I'm comparing thsi work to other works by the same author; I'd recommend you select one of Ms. Peters more recent mysteries, which are nearly note-perfect, over this. But by all means, pick something she's written; you're certain to be hooked.
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Format: Paperback
This book starts out slow, and I had to get through the first couple of chapters to get to the interesting part. A young college student and her boyfriend journey to Mexico to find the woman's father. The father left when she was a child and has not communicated with her since. He seems to be ambivalent about seeing her again and his household is a strange one. The boyfriend strikes up a friendship with Ivan, the son of Carol's father's paramour, and the trip seems to disintegrate from there. His previously mild drug habit becomes worse and a strange man seems to be following Carol.
There are a few unexplained plot points and loose ends here, and the language is a bit dated, but this is an entertaining book, good for the beach.
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Format: Paperback
This book starts out slow, and I had to get through the first couple of chapters to get to the interesting part. A young college student and her boyfriend journey to Mexico to find the woman's father. The father left when she was a child and has not communicated with her since. He seems to be ambivalent about seeing her again and his household is a strange one. The boyfriend strikes up a friendship with Ivan, the son of Carol's father's paramour, and the trip seems to disintegrate from there. His previously mild drug habit becomes worse and a strange man seems to be following Carol.
There are a few unexplained plot points and loose ends here, and the language is a bit dated, but this is an entertaining book, good for the beach.
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