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In The Night Kitchen Paperback – Jan 25 1996


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Paperback, Jan 25 1996
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Frequently Bought Together

In The Night Kitchen + Where The Wild Things Are
Price For Both: CDN$ 17.99


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Programs and Genres (Jan. 25 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064434362
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064434362
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 0.3 x 27.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 172 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #15,256 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

When asked, Maurice Sendak insisted that he was not a comics artist, but an illustrator. However, it's hard to not notice comics aspects in works like In the Night Kitchen. The child of the story is depicted floating from panel to panel as he drifts through the fantastic dream world of the bakers' kitchen. Sendak's use of multiple panels and integrated hand-lettered text is an interesting contrast to his more traditional children's books containing single-page illustrations such as his wildly popular Where the Wild Things Are. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Maurice Sendak received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are. He also received the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Medal for illustration, the only American ever awarded this international honor; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award from the American Library Association; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts. In 2003 Sendak received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.


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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
My three year old son has heard this story at least once a week since he was born. He is not tired of it yet. Neither am I.
The illustrations are reminiscent of 1960s children's advertisements, and are positively gorgeous! The cityscape made of kitchen containers and cooking utensils stimulates children's imagination and makes for a dreamy, innocent background to the charming story.
Some parents will no doubt fixate on the fact that Mickey is naked and has a penis (gasp!). If you are the parent of a little boy this should not shock you. If you are not the parent of a little boy, you are surely aware that boys do in fact have these things. I cannot understand why this one aspect of the book creates such controversy.
The cadences of the story are fun, and children are likely to take up chanting "Milk in the batter! Milk in the batter!" as they become familiar with the story. My son loves to say the words with me as I read, and the marching rhythm of the story makes it easy for him to remember.
It's a fun, silly book sure to become a favorite in your child's library.
As a sidenote, The Nutshell Kids collection has a video version of this, which is very good.
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Format: Hardcover
My three year old son has heard this story at least once a week since he was born. He is not tired of it yet. Neither am I.
The illustrations are reminiscent of 1960s children's advertisements, and are positively gorgeous! The cityscape made of kitchen containers and cooking utensils stimulates children's imagination and makes for a dreamy, innocent background to the charming story.
Some parents will no doubt fixate on the fact that Mickey is naked and has a penis (gasp!). If you are the parent of a little boy this should not shock you. If you are not the parent of a little boy, you are surely aware that boys do in fact have these things. I cannot understand why this one aspect of the book creates such controversy.
The cadences of the story are fun, and children are likely to take up chanting "Milk in the batter! Milk in the batter!" as they become familiar with the story. My son loves to say the words with me as I read, and the marching rhythm of the story makes it easy for him to remember.
It's a fun, silly book sure to become a favorite in your child's library.
As a sidenote, The Nutshell Kids collection has a video version of this, which is very good.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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By A Customer on June 14 2003
Format: Hardcover
I didn't want to give this book five stars. I fought against it, because I don't particularly enjoy the book. The illustrations aren't that attractive to me and it took me a while to get used to the rhythm of the words.
Having said that, I give this book five stars because my daughter LOVES this book. I sometimes have to hide it at night because I'm so tired of reading the "Mickey" book. Apparently Sendak knows an awful lot about what children like and how their minds work, because my daughter seldom tires of the story. (Her favorite part is when Mickey takes the measuring cup and goes up and up over the Milky Way.)
I'm honestly a little surprised over the "nekkid" controversy. It's not like the boy is drawn in explicit detail! My daughter's seen boy babies getting their diapers changed, so the concept of a penis is HARDLY frightening/startling/damaging to her. Geez, lighten up people!
Also, for those who were complaining about the concept of cake for breakfast, why don't we consider how many American children get French toast, pancakes, donuts, poptarts, or sugar-coated cereals for breakfast? Hardly nutritionally superior to cake, so I'm not lying in bed at night obsessing about the poor nutritional messages this book is sending to my child. :-)
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By Cher on Feb. 20 2003
Format: Hardcover
I discovered this book by accident a few months ago, and picked it up when I noticed that it was a Caldecott Honor Medal winner. I read through it and found it confusing, yet interesting.
My three-year-old goes through 2-3 week periods in which he has a favorite story that must be read every night at the end of our reading time. Lately, it's been "Where the Wild Things Are." So, tonight, I decided to begin the evening with "In the Night Kitchen." My son was transfixed by this story. He immediately wanted me to read it again. To the logical, adult mind it makes no sense. It didn't surprise me at all to read that previous reviewers were reminded of a drug trip. But from my child's point of view, it was a fantastic story. His eyes never left the pages, and he frequently nodded or exclaimed, wide-eyed, with mouth open. I found the rythym and cadence of the words, and it flowed very well.
If you find the book odd, just think of the words to the countless nursery rhymes that you've recited and loved so many times over the years. There are quite a few that make no sense at all! At least, not to grownups:)
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By A Customer on Jan. 17 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is a crazy childrens book about a boy named Mickey, who we first meet attempting to go to sleep in his bed. However, a racket below his room prevents him from falling asleep. After asserting himself and yelling at whoever is making the noises to keep quite, he falls out of bed. He falls through the dark of his house, out of his pajamas, and ends up falling right into a bowl of cake batter in the night kitchen (a dream inspired city, with buildings made of food products), where three fat bakers make the "morning cake." The bakers mistake Mickey for milk, and mix him into the batter along with other ingrediants. After thoughouly stirring him in the cake, the bakers put the bowl of batter in the oven. Luckily, Mickey pops out and jumps into a pile of bread dough. He fashions an airplane with it, and takes off determined to get the bakers milk. It just so happens that one of the buildings is a giant milk bottle. Mickey dives in, and pours some real milk into the cake below him. With everything straightened out, Mickey jumps off the milk bottle and floats back into his pajamas and into bed, where he finally falls asleep.
This is a weird story that may seem strange to adults, but all kids seem to love. On the whole, if you're tired of reading the same old story to your kids each night, this is the book for you.
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