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The Okinawa Program: How the World's Longest-Lived People Achieve Everlasting Health--And How You Can Too Paperback – Mar 12 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Harmony; 1 edition (March 12 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0609807501
  • ISBN-13: 978-0609807507
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.5 x 3.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 590 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #85,448 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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First Sentence
In Ogimi, a pleasant small village typical of northern Okinawa, a stone welcome marker stands near the beach. Read the first page
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By "uchinanchu" on April 1 2002
Format: Hardcover
This letter is in response to some misunderstandings from a couple of previous reviewers about levels and types of fat in the Okinawa diet. Before I get into my comments on the Okinawa diet I would like to say that I am a professional nurse/educator/nutrition researcher from Okinawa (born and raised) who also spent some time in the United States (California). My comments regarding the Okinawa diet are based on my professional experience involved in nutrition and other health education/research.I have worked with (or know) many nutritional researchers in Okinawa and am familiar with the nutritional research literature on diet and longevity as well. I think I can understand why some American reviewers have mistaken the Okinawa diet as �ghigh fat�h, as we like to use vegetable oil in most of our stir-fry cooking (called champuru) and there has been increasing fat intake in Okinawa and the rest of post-war Japan which has resulted in large generational differences. Here are the facts according to nutritional authorities in Okinawa and Japan:
1)The Okinawa diet itself (1998) contained 31% total energy from fat, 52.9% carbohydrate and 16% protein (Japan National Nutrition Survey 1998). Compared to mainland Japan this is higher in fat (26.3% vs 31%) but compared to America it is still lower. (According to USDA Food Consumption Surveys total fat intake has fallen from 40% to 33% between 1977 and 1994).
2)Total Fat is NOT really that much of an issue as there are �ggood fats�h and �gbad fats�h . As Dr. Walter Willet�fs (Harvard University) 1994 article in Science titled:�hWhat Should We Eat?�h shows, the 1960�fs Greeks consumed even more fat (40% total) than we do now in Okinawa, but still had low cardiovascular mortality because they were consuming the �ggood fats�h (ie.
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By A Customer on April 17 2003
Format: Paperback
The recommendations of the Okinwa Program repeat information that has been available for a long time. The benefits of low-fat, low-calorie diets, exercise, and reducing stress are well known. This is just one more book for the already overloaded shelf of self-help books. It might be interesting to compare life-expectancy of Okinawans BEFORE World War II with this data, as it necessarily excludes members of the same generation who died of malnutrition, illness, accident, or war-time incidents before that time.
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Format: Hardcover
One of the major "findings" in this book was that Okinawans consumed very little saturated fat (meaning fat containing saturated fatty acid [SFA]), and this was supposed to be a major benefit. The main oil used in cooking was said to be canola oil. Since canola oil is a recent invention, becoming common only in the last 20 years in Canada and the USA, it could hardly have been a benefit to Okinawans who are now very old.
My co-workers at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, Mignon S. Adams and David C. Geliebter, spent a month in Okinawa recently, with special attention on food. They did not see any canola oil in use. The common oils were peanut (16% SFA), soybean (15% SFA), rapeseed (1% SFA) and lard (44% SFA). Data are mostly from Mary C. Enig, Know Your Fats, Bethesda Press, 2000.
The Okinawans also eat significant amounts of pork and moderate amounts of chicken, both of which contain considerable SFAs. There is no unbiased evidence that SFAs are unhealthful (Taubes G, Science 2001:291:2536-2545).
This was confirmed by Stephen C. Byrnes, who lives in Honolulu, HI, and has friends raised in Okinawa. They ate fish, rice and vegetables, but pork and lard "...have always been the mainstay of this people's diet". Sally Fallon and Mary C. Enig quoted an Okinawan professor who wrote that the Okinawan diet was "greasy and good".
****
The glycemic index table was incomplete, missing all the good foods that have very low glycemic indices that diabetics can eat, such as nuts, cheese, fats, oils, and meat. Diabetics have been punished for decades by being handed tables such as this where they might assume that foods not included should not be eaten.
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Format: Hardcover
This book claims to be an accurate presentation of the "Okinawan Diet," but the elements of that supposed diet are a far cry from reality. I live in Hawaii where there is a large Okinawan community (including first, second, third, etc., generations) and I have many friends who were raised in Okinawa. Believe me: Their diet is anything but "low-fat" as this book claims.
Okinawans are known for their preference for fatty pork and they principally use lard in their cooking--nothing low fat here I can assure you. They do eat vegetables, rice, fish, and those delicious purple potatoes, but the mainstay of Okinawan cuisine is pork.
This book is simply a politically correct re-writing of the actual evidence done by the Spin Doctors of modern nutrition. You're better off getting Fallon & Enig's book "Nourishing Traditions," or Allan and Lutz' book "Life Without Bread."
CAVEAT EMPTOR!
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Format: Hardcover
The authors write that each day, the average Okinawan eats seven servings of fruits and vegetables, seven servings of grains, and two servings of tofu. Fish is eaten two or three times per week. During the first week, the "Everlasting Health" menu includes 5 servings of fish, 7 servings of poultry, pork, beef, and 12 servings of dairy. ...
Okinawans eat just two-three servings of fish each week, and little or no milk, dairy or meat. Midway through the book, a the authors include a mention of Okinawan "power foods" containing protective phytochemicals. This list of antioxidant-rich foods includes tofu, miso, carrots, tea, goya melon, konbu (dried kelp), cabbage, nori (dried seaweed), bean sprouts, raw soybeans, sweet potatoes, and peppers. Unfortunately, the authors did not have the vision or the culinary expertise to include these foods in their "Four Weeks to Everlasting Health" diet.
With diet, it's not what you eat, but what you don't eat that becomes the critical factor towards achieving and maintaining good health.
Seems to me that the authors missed the critical points of their important work and their conclusions, based upon their suggested menus are less than pathetic.
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