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The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals Hardcover – Apr 11 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Press HC, The; 1st Edition edition (April 11 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594200823
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594200823
  • Product Dimensions: 23.9 x 16.3 x 3.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 726 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #116,998 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Brian Griffith TOP 500 REVIEWER on Sept. 24 2007
Format: Paperback
This is the most basic culinary detective book. In modern America, Michael Pollan wonders what to eat: "... imagine for a moment if we once again knew, strictly as a matter of course, these few unremarkable things: What it is we're eating. Where it came from. How it found it's way to our table. And what, in a true accounting, it really cost."

Of course most North Americans can't answer these questions in any self-satisfying way, so Pollan sets off on the case. He journeys through the belly of the food industry beast -- to the massive government-subsidized corn plantations of Iowa, the huge cattle feed lots and the slaughterhouses. He visits the plants where trainload after trainload of corn is refined into the chemical components of processed food, and then he takes his family to McDonalds.

Searching for alternatives to totally explore, Pollan visits large-scale organic plantations. He works for a spell on an organic family farm in Virginia, helping to slaughter the chickens for his next gourmet meal. And last he goes whole hog back to the hunter-gatherer days, searching for mushrooms and shooting a wild pig in the forests of Northern California.

The whole experience yields tons of great stories, and the kind of good common sense I can't resist quoting:

"A tension has always existed between the capitalist imperative to maximise efficiency at any cost and the moral imperatives of culture, which have historically served as a counterweight to the moral blindness of the market. This is another example of the cultural contradictions of capitalism -- the tendency over time for the economic impulse to erode the moral underpinnings of society. Mercy toward the animals in our care is one such cruelty." (p.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Charlie Russel on June 13 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is one of the most important and thought provoking books I've had the pleasure (however scary) to read in a long, long time. Pollan traces the roots of four meals down to their component parts. You will never look at "high fructose sweetener" the same again, and the sight of vast fields of corn now fills me with grave concern. But more importantly, it has helped me understand the real cost of the food I eat. In a way that the 100 mile diet alludes to, but this is a far more in-depth look at the food chain and the perils of mono-culture.

It is also an excellent read. Well written, thoroughly researched, and interesting. The audio version is very well read by Scott Brick. I found myself getting to my destination and then sitting in the car listening to the book instead of getting out. But I ended up buying the hardback as well to have and re-read.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Coach C TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 31 2007
Format: Paperback
Or an even better question is 'what is dinner made of?'. Michael Pollan brings to us his journey to find the 'perfect meal'. In the process of his search, he debunks several myths about the industrial agriculture that produces the majority of food at your local supermarket. One of the more revealing discoveries is that buying 'organic' is pretty much the same as your ordinary industrial agriculture, sometimes grown right next to the regular supermarket foods.

While Pollan does go on to describe a meal entirely hunted and gathered (mostly but not entirely actually), he concludes to eat this way in our modern world is virtually impossible. So, we basically have no choice other than to eat what is available in the supermarkets and 'organic' food stores which after all hasn't decreased the average lifespan. Ultimately, while corn-fed animals may not be as 'clean' as grass-fed animals, it won't make much difference in how long you live.

The book is very well-written and Pollan's research is extensive. His mix of documented research and first-hand accounts is what makes the book so credible and insightful.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Tom Tom on Dec 23 2008
Format: Paperback
The Omnivore's Dilemma is the product of a very talented investigative journalist (who also happens to be a good writer) tackling one of the most important issues facing N. American consumers - what's on their dinner plates.
The book isn't written as an "expose" of the food industry - Pollan isn't trying to grab you by your shirt collar and slap you around with information. And despite the lengthy discussion of the factory farm system, this isn't a vegetarian or vegan call to arms. Although he never actually states his position, it's fairly clear that Pollan is an omnivore who finds it defensible to eat animals raised on organic / natural farms who lived a good life and had a quick clean death. What he does not find defensible is eating animals - like the billions going through the factory farms - that did nothing but suffer for their entire existence before they reached our plates.

Pollan emphasizes several times the fact that it is incumbent upon the eater to truly look at, and make a conscious moral decision, about what he/she is eating. On page 312 he writes about the choice you have to make after you accept the evidence that an animal was tortured to get to your dinner table: You look away (and ignore the truth) - or you stop eating animals.

Aside from the moral problems associated with the factory farm system, Pollan is also great at discussing what is actually happening in this system. Listen to this description of the food given to cattle:
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Around to the other side of the building, tanker trucks back up to silo-shaped tanks into which they pump thousands of gallons of liquefied fat and protein supplements.
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