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The Outrage


Price: CDN$ 46.48
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Product Details

  • Actors: Paul Newman, Laurence Harvey, Claire Bloom, Edward G. Robinson, William Shatner
  • Directors: Martin Ritt
  • Writers: Akira Kurosawa, Fay Kanin, Michael Kanin, Rynosuke Akutagawa, Shinobu Hashimoto
  • Format: Black & White, DVD-Video, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: NR
  • Studio: Warner Bros. Home Video
  • Release Date: Feb. 17 2009
  • Run Time: 96 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001KO1BBW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #62,253 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Amazon.ca

This underrated 1964 film directed by Martin Ritt (Sounder, Norma Rae) features Paul Newman in a story influenced by the classic multiple-perspective film Rashomon, with an American spin. Newman (The Hustler, Hud) plays a Mexican bandit in the Old West accused of raping a frontier woman (Claire Bloom), but conflicting stories from the bandit, the woman, her husband, and others soon complicate matters and make finding the truth elusive. Newman has fun with his daring, over-the-top portrayal, and Ritt's socially conscious streak is in evidence here as he investigates whether the truth is left up to whoever defines it. The Outrage is a chance both to see a terrific cast of classic actors and yet another prime example of the influence of great international films. --Robert Lane

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Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 6 1999
Format: VHS Tape
Pay no attention to Maltin's dsimissive review: this is a fine film. The entire cast is in excellent form, with DaSilva's miner and Robinson's snake oil salesman particularly noteworthy. Newman's performance as the bandit is peculiar but fascinating, and often hilarious. An amusing and thought-provoking movie from the 60's, a decade that gave us some of our best films.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alan Breck on Sept. 17 2002
Format: VHS Tape
"The Outrage," while not quite an outrage, is, at least, a disappointment. A film with this cast (Paul Newman, Claire Bloom, Edward G. Robinson) and director (Martin Ritt) promises a better result. Much of the fault lies with Ritt. He shot the film with an odd combination of lenses and camera angles that, while adding to the atmosphere, make the flashback sequences appear distant and uninvolving. The question, in the end, is not "what happened?" but rather "who cares?"
The film succeeds best in the framing sequences featuring Robinson, in one of his best roles, as the con man who keeps score and philosophizes about human nature. James Wong Howe's exceptional black and white photography deserves special mention, and Newman's over-the-top Mexican bandit almost convinces.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By UnsolvedFan on July 21 2002
Format: VHS Tape
I'm not sure I precisely understood this film, possibly because
major aspects of the plot are never fully explained. The acting
is tedious and confusing. Also, the colorized version is terrible. Stick with black and white.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Jackson on Sept. 26 2002
Format: VHS Tape
If I could have chosen "0" stars, I would have done so. This had to be Newman's worst!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 23 reviews
28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
One of the better films of the 60's July 6 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
Pay no attention to Maltin's dsimissive review: this is a fine film. The entire cast is in excellent form, with DaSilva's miner and Robinson's snake oil salesman particularly noteworthy. Newman's performance as the bandit is peculiar but fascinating, and often hilarious. An amusing and thought-provoking movie from the 60's, a decade that gave us some of our best films.
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Waiting for the DVD version! April 7 2003
By LtCol Richard L. Jones (USAF-Retired) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
One of my all time favorites since it came out in the sixties. In my line of work, there has always been an axiom that in every controversy, there is my story, your story, and the truth. This film does the best job of presenting this age-old dilemma of searching for the truth through biased observers. Not only that, it is extremely entertaining as well, with a cast to die for, each one protraying their character four different ways within the same film. Newman, Bloom and Harvey are magnificent, doing exactly what each version requires. There is quite a bit of humor as well, and I suppose some reviewers were put off by that, wanting the work to be more serious. Well, this film is proof that a serious subject can be dealt with in an entertaining fashion. Wish they would release in DVD.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
I've Never Seen Rashomon March 1 2009
By David Baldwin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Unlike a lot of the reviewers I have no frame of reference in comparing this Western remake of Kurasawa's original so I have to judge the film on it's own terms. It's a good film that posits alot of interesting food for thought not the least that cowardice and vanity are sins comparable to rape and murder. That said it doesn't live up to it's potential. I attribute that to the hammy performances by the film's principals and Paul Newman is not exempt from criticism. His bandit seems to have been lifted note-for-note from Eli Wallach in "The Magnificent Seven" and not with good results. You could engender more empathy for Claire Bloom's rape victim if her performance wasn't so overwrought. Laurence Harvey, per usual, is the substance of wood. The best work here is delivered by the supporting actors who witnessed the events of the trial. Believe it or not, William Shatner as a disillusioned preacher gives an effectively understated account. Howard Da Silva as a prospector who gives key testmony at the trial and the inimitable Edward G. Robinson as a sarcastic snake oil salesman are also terrific. An interesting film that could have been more.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Four people tell four different stories of the same event Dec 7 2008
By Annie Van Auken - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Based on two of Akutagawa's writings ("Rashomon" and "In a Grove") and adapted for the screen by Akira Kurosawa, THE OUTRAGE is the story of a crime that's recounted by the three people involved, plus a fourth man who witnessed what happened. Their memories of an assault and murder vary widely; only one of them recalls the incidents accurately.

Martin Ritt directs and James Wong Howe is cinematographer of a most unusual western. With a fine script and superb cast-- this one is a standout!

Paul Newman's next significant picture after "Outrage" was HARPER (1966).
Laurence Harvey may be best-remembered for his portrayal of Raymond Shaw in THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE (1962).
Claire Bloom co-starred with Richard Burton in Martin Ritt's classic THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD (1965).
Edward G. Robinson is excellent as king of poker players Lancey Howard in THE CINCINNATI KID (1965).
William Shatner's finest screen work was in Roger Corman's racially-charged THE INTRUDER (1962).

Parenthetical number preceding title is a 1 to 10 viewer poll rating found at a film resource website.

(6.2) The Outrage (1962) - Paul Newman/Laurence Harvey/Claire Bloom/Edward G. Robinson/William Shatner/Howard Da Silva/Albert Salmi/Thomas Chalmers/Paul Fix
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Excellent acting; entertaining, compelling drama Nov. 8 2010
By E. Beckstrom - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Rendition of Akira Kurosawa's masterpiece, Rashomon (1958), set in the American old west. Paul Newman so immerses himself in the role of the outlaw that he is practically unrecognizable; I literally forgot I was watching Newman act. He completely eliminates all pretentions and makes his performance invisible - a significant achievement for any actor. His mannerisms and gestures are simply fun and fascinating to watch. Edward G. Robinson chews up his lines as the cackling, cynical huckster (if this were a Greek tragedy, he would be an ironic chorus) - simply grand. William Shatner is very good as the quietly disillusioned preacher. Shatner is especially good at conveying pain and sorrow through his eyes. If you have ever seen Star Trek II or III, Boston Legal, The Twilight Zone, or even The Horror at 30,000 Feet, for that matter, you know what I mean. Claire Bloom is also very good, as is Howard Da Silva.

This is indeed a film that relies as much on performance as it does on dialogue. The latter is also pretty consistently very good, with a few moments of true greatness. The cinematography of the legendary James Wong Howe is beautiful, as are the backdrops of this mostly-soundstage film. It is a little rough around the edges, but for fans of any of the aforementioned actors, of classic (if not classical) Hollywood cinema, and of challenging dramas in general, The Outrage is a must see.


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