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The Outrage


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Product Details

  • Actors: Paul Newman, Laurence Harvey, Claire Bloom, Edward G. Robinson, William Shatner
  • Directors: Martin Ritt
  • Writers: Michael Kanin, Akira Kurosawa, Fay Kanin, Ryûnosuke Akutagawa, Shinobu Hashimoto
  • Producers: Martin Ritt, A. Ronald Lubin, Michael Kanin
  • Format: Black & White, DVD-Video, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: NR
  • Studio: Warner
  • Release Date: Feb. 17 2009
  • Run Time: 96 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001KO1BBW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #30,343 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)


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Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

By R. Jackson on Sept. 26 2002
Format: VHS Tape
If I could have chosen "0" stars, I would have done so. This had to be Newman's worst!
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By Alan Breck on Sept. 17 2002
Format: VHS Tape
"The Outrage," while not quite an outrage, is, at least, a disappointment. A film with this cast (Paul Newman, Claire Bloom, Edward G. Robinson) and director (Martin Ritt) promises a better result. Much of the fault lies with Ritt. He shot the film with an odd combination of lenses and camera angles that, while adding to the atmosphere, make the flashback sequences appear distant and uninvolving. The question, in the end, is not "what happened?" but rather "who cares?"
The film succeeds best in the framing sequences featuring Robinson, in one of his best roles, as the con man who keeps score and philosophizes about human nature. James Wong Howe's exceptional black and white photography deserves special mention, and Newman's over-the-top Mexican bandit almost convinces.
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By UnsolvedFan on July 21 2002
Format: VHS Tape
I'm not sure I precisely understood this film, possibly because
major aspects of the plot are never fully explained. The acting
is tedious and confusing. Also, the colorized version is terrible. Stick with black and white.
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By A Customer on July 6 1999
Format: VHS Tape
Pay no attention to Maltin's dsimissive review: this is a fine film. The entire cast is in excellent form, with DaSilva's miner and Robinson's snake oil salesman particularly noteworthy. Newman's performance as the bandit is peculiar but fascinating, and often hilarious. An amusing and thought-provoking movie from the 60's, a decade that gave us some of our best films.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 20 reviews
28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
One of the better films of the 60's July 6 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
Pay no attention to Maltin's dsimissive review: this is a fine film. The entire cast is in excellent form, with DaSilva's miner and Robinson's snake oil salesman particularly noteworthy. Newman's performance as the bandit is peculiar but fascinating, and often hilarious. An amusing and thought-provoking movie from the 60's, a decade that gave us some of our best films.
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Waiting for the DVD version! April 7 2003
By LtCol Richard L. Jones (USAF-Retired) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
One of my all time favorites since it came out in the sixties. In my line of work, there has always been an axiom that in every controversy, there is my story, your story, and the truth. This film does the best job of presenting this age-old dilemma of searching for the truth through biased observers. Not only that, it is extremely entertaining as well, with a cast to die for, each one protraying their character four different ways within the same film. Newman, Bloom and Harvey are magnificent, doing exactly what each version requires. There is quite a bit of humor as well, and I suppose some reviewers were put off by that, wanting the work to be more serious. Well, this film is proof that a serious subject can be dealt with in an entertaining fashion. Wish they would release in DVD.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
I've Never Seen Rashomon March 1 2009
By David Baldwin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Unlike a lot of the reviewers I have no frame of reference in comparing this Western remake of Kurasawa's original so I have to judge the film on it's own terms. It's a good film that posits alot of interesting food for thought not the least that cowardice and vanity are sins comparable to rape and murder. That said it doesn't live up to it's potential. I attribute that to the hammy performances by the film's principals and Paul Newman is not exempt from criticism. His bandit seems to have been lifted note-for-note from Eli Wallach in "The Magnificent Seven" and not with good results. You could engender more empathy for Claire Bloom's rape victim if her performance wasn't so overwrought. Laurence Harvey, per usual, is the substance of wood. The best work here is delivered by the supporting actors who witnessed the events of the trial. Believe it or not, William Shatner as a disillusioned preacher gives an effectively understated account. Howard Da Silva as a prospector who gives key testmony at the trial and the inimitable Edward G. Robinson as a sarcastic snake oil salesman are also terrific. An interesting film that could have been more.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Four people tell four different stories of the same event Dec 7 2008
By Annie Van Auken - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Based on two of Akutagawa's writings ("Rashomon" and "In a Grove") and adapted for the screen by Akira Kurosawa, THE OUTRAGE is the story of a crime that's recounted by the three people involved, plus a fourth man who witnessed what happened. Their memories of an assault and murder vary widely; only one of them recalls the incidents accurately.

Martin Ritt directs and James Wong Howe is cinematographer of a most unusual western. With a fine script and superb cast-- this one is a standout!

Paul Newman's next significant picture after "Outrage" was HARPER (1966).
Laurence Harvey may be best-remembered for his portrayal of Raymond Shaw in THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE (1962).
Claire Bloom co-starred with Richard Burton in Martin Ritt's classic THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD (1965).
Edward G. Robinson is excellent as king of poker players Lancey Howard in THE CINCINNATI KID (1965).
William Shatner's finest screen work was in Roger Corman's racially-charged THE INTRUDER (1962).

Parenthetical number preceding title is a 1 to 10 viewer poll rating found at a film resource website.

(6.2) The Outrage (1962) - Paul Newman/Laurence Harvey/Claire Bloom/Edward G. Robinson/William Shatner/Howard Da Silva/Albert Salmi/Thomas Chalmers/Paul Fix
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Superb! Rashomon Re-make June 1 2014
By (Mr.) Rene Pineda - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The screenplay, actors, music, photography, the Old Southwest location, is absolutely superb! The screenplay expands the story and adds more detail to each persona. Newman, the bandido Carrasco, speaks English and Spanish which is common, and pulls the 'race card' at his trial. Edward G. Robinson, the 'Con Man', scoffs, mocks and laughs every time he hears a new version. In the final scenes, Claire Bloom's brilliant performance puts us in the mood of a live Broadway play by Tennessee Williams. Notice the expressions of The Prospector, Howard Da Silva, when the Con Man finds him out. William Shatner's part, The Preacher, is minimal. Laurence Harvey's character, The Husband, expresses loathsomeness, scorn and disdain for his wife verbally and on his face. The camerawork, ethereal ( notice the blur when Carrasco is sick and falls off his horse and the scene around the dead man), close ups, long shots, overhead, upward spiral, and the location in the Arizona desert and scenes by the waterfall are so picturesque. One can see James Wong Howe's camera influence from 'Rashomon'. The musical compositions and orchestrations of Alex North are wonderful ! There are only a few sections in the film where music is played, which is effective in maintaining the silence and solitude of the desert. Festive Mexican dance music, with harp, flutes, tambourine, drums, violins, starts when Carrasco takes a siesta under a giant cactus as the couple passes by. The music continues as Carrasco gallops after them through the giant cactus desert and is reminiscent of "The Cisco Kid". Later, a lovely theme for the wife that modulates into an eerie, spooky theme, dark harmonies orchestrated with bass clarinet and low alto flutes when she is accosted at the waterfall by Carrasco on his heavily breathing horse, which puts emphasis on the lecherous looks he gives to his victim. Also, the haunting sound effects and surrealistic photography when she plunges into the river. Hollywood can not be 100% politically correct and please everyone. Even though this film may seem 'politically incorrect', it is not. There are many Mexicans that do look like Paul Newman we call 'rubio', meaning 'fair'. Anthony Quinn already got an Oscar as a Mexican revolutionary, "Zapatista", in Viva Zapata (with Marlon Brando playing Zapata). Why would Quinn take a role like 'Carrasco' ? If you really want to keep it real, how about the bandido in "Treasure of Sierra Madre'', Mexican actor Alfonso ( "We don't need any stinking badges" ) Bedoya to play the role? The Apaches complained about 'Geronimo' being played by Cherokee actor Wes Studi. Give me a break! There must be 'box office attractions' to play the roles. Great cast. To me, casting is everything. Edward G. Robinson is at his best. I really enjoy Newman's performance with his 'Wallace Beery like raspy voice' and how the screen writers are historically 'politically correct' when Carrasco mentions the way Mexicans, 'greasers', are looked down upon by 'gringo's and how they took away his territory, and would be found guilty of alleged past, present and future crimes anyway. I know the post civil war history of my family from the Old Southwest. (Many settlers from Spain and Old Mexico lost their Spanish land grants and were then treated like Negro slaves.)
The most recent edition of 'Rashomon' has a commentary that takes us through each step of the story, purpose of camera angles, effects, etc. Also, interviews with the cameraman, set director and others in the making of it. I have watched 'Rashomon' and 'Outrage' several times. Each time I see something new. I recommend others do the same. I absolutely love this film and will place it with my other favorites of all time, such as Casablanca, Rashomon, Seven Samurai, and the 'original' Around The World In 80 Days by Michael Todd.
Some films that were neglected like Orson Wells' "Touch of Evil", is now considered one of his best (Charlton Heston is a Mexican in this one). I hope you enjoy this film as much as I do and that someday "Outrage" will have a commentary and interview with William Shatner in the making and give this film the credit and recognition it deserves. Thanks for reading this.- RP

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