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The Paradise Snare: Star Wars (The Han Solo Trilogy) Paperback – May 5 1997


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The Paradise Snare: Star Wars (The Han Solo Trilogy) + Rebel Dawn: Star Wars (The Han Solo Trilogy) + The Hutt Gambit: Star Wars (The Han Solo Trilogy)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Spectra (May 5 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553574159
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553574159
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.2 x 17.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 45 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (147 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #10,103 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Library Journal

With the re-release of the Star Wars movies, interest in the books will likely increase. While many of the recent ones took the beloved characters into the future, this first book in the "Han Solo Trilogy" tells the story of the smuggler/pilot's childhood and teen years. Abandoned, then taken in by a Fagin-like thief/space pirate, and finally raised by an old female Wookiee, Han escapes into his first piloting job, where he falls in love for the first time and saves his girlfriend from enslavement. Crispin deftly weaves Han's early years into the Star WarsR storyline and provides details that shape his personality. This prequel belongs in Star WarsR sf collections.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the Author

A. C. Crispin is the creator and author of the StarBridge series and has written some of the most popular Star Trek novels yet published, including Yesterday's Son and its sequel Time for Yesterday. She is a frequent guest at science fiction conventions, and is eastern regional director of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. She lives in Maryland, USA. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Joe Sherry on July 1 2004
Format: Paperback
Han Solo is one of the most beloved characters in the Star Wars Universe, and he has been since the first film was released. With "The Paradise Snare", author A.C. Crispin brings us the first part of the story of a young Han Solo and shows us what made him into the rogue that we have come to love. Han starts out working (indentured, it seems) to a criminal named Garris Shrike. He finally wants out and there is no way that Shrike will let him. But, with the help and sacrifice of his wookiee friend, Dewlanna, Han is able to escape and find a job as a pilot on the planet Ylesia.
On the planet, Han is assigned a bodyguard, Muuurgh, who is as much guarding Han as guarding Ylesia against Han. Ylesia has a secret that relates to the spice mining it produces. It is supposedly a religious community which the pilgrims voluntarily work, but Han soon feels that something isn't quite right. He meets a pilgrim, #923 (we do later learn her name), and starts falling for her and wants to rescue her as well as rescue himself from the soon to be hopeless situation on Ylesia.
This book was much better than I expected. It succeeds at doing several things all at once. First, and most importantly, it is an entertaining story in its own right. Second, it starts giving hints and clues and examples of how Han Solo became the man he was in the movies. He distrusts religion and holds himself back from falling in love. He is friends with a wookiee. Why? The set up begins in "The Paradise Snare". Third, this book sets up more Han Solo novels in the future (two more books of this trilogy) and makes us wonder how a boy dreaming of being a soldier in the Empire grow up to fight in the Rebellion? Within the context of Star Wars, this was a good story.
-Joe Sherry
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By SkinLab on July 14 2004
Format: Paperback
On its own merits "The Paradise Snare" is average fiction. It's a very easy read that I was able to cruise through in just a few sittings. It doesn't get hung up with flowery language or "big words". This works to its benefit as it's a very fast read and gives us great insight into Han Solo's earlier years. You can see where the author is going with Solo and how he initially starts the novel a naive (compared to the mature solo; he's still sharper than the average 17 year old), sensitive (Solo cries throughout the first chapter) young man and by the final chapters he's well on his way to the arrogant sarcastic scoundrel we all love.
I recommend it to any Star Wars fan, in fact I'm in the middle of "Hut Gambit" book two in the series (equally as good, if not better so far), however for those with little interest in the greatest space opera of all time, the book lacks the depth and sophistication of better written sci-fi.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JediMack on June 18 2003
Format: Paperback
This is arguably my favorite Star Wars series of books. Paradise Snare takes you from Han's "Charles Dickens" beginning and why he understands Wookie speak to introduce his first love. This trilogy is also the logic beginning of the "classic" SW - Luke skywalker era, as oposed to the "prequel" era and the NJO era.
If you have already read some NJO and Prequel stuff, start your journey through the "classic period here!
For those who are disappointed with the "prequel" stories and the NJO books, the Classic star Wars starts here and ends with vision of the future.
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Format: Paperback
Have you ever wondered about Han Solo's past? Why is he such a loner? Why does he have such a cavalier attitude? Why can't he trust anyone?
All of these questions and more are answered in the Han Solo Trilogy by A.C. Crispin. Unlike the prior Han Solo Trilogy by Brian Daley, this trio of books delves deeper into Han Solo's past, revealing things like how Solo became a pilot, how he met Chewbacca, and more.
The first book in A.C. Crispin's trilogy is The Paradise Snare. In this book, we meet Han Solo when he is three years old, orphaned and homeless. Rescued by a ruthless Fagan-like character, Garris Shrike, Han is forced to beg and steal to appease his benefactor. He dreams of attending the Imperial Academy and becoming an officer in the Imperial Navy. However, he realizes he must escape Shrike is he ever hopes to achieve his goal. With help from a trusted friend he manages to escape, though not completely unscathed, and heads to the planet Ylesia, where he hopes to find a job as a pilot. The planet is toted as a religious paradise, but as Han continues to discover, things aren't always what they seem.
Having read other A.C. Crispin novels, I had hopes for this series. Although the author had never written novels featuring Star Wars characters before, A.C. Crispin is an accomplished science fiction writer, producing books in the Star Trek and V series. Paradise Snare was no disappointment. I found that Crispin had a full grasp of Han's character from the first page to the last. The book revealed a great deal about the reckless, carefree, cavalier Han Solo we meet in Star Wars: A New Hope. Han Solo fans will be greatly pleased by this novel. I, for one, can't wait to read the next novel in the series, The Hutt Gambit!
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Format: Paperback
This is truly one of the best Star Wars books I have ever read, and I'd place it right at the top alongside Timmothy Zahn and Aaron Allston. I started reading this book late at night, stayed up till two in the morning, and immediately finished it when i woke up the next day. Though many Star Wars books have been great reads, I can barely recall any that have had this kind of "must read" effect on me.
Within the first few pages, Crispin nails Han Solo's character and draws us into his world of pickpocket gangs, scams, and later spice smuggling and piloting. Han is so well written that you could imagine a younger Harrison Ford delivering the lines. Throughout the course of the novel, Crispin gives us the set up for some of Han's ideologies later in life: his reason for saving Chewbacca, his disdain for hokey religions, his inability to tell later Leia he loves her, and much more. For fans of continuity, take note: in the early chapters Crispin blends in two events, one from a Zahn novel and the other from "Tales of the Bounty Hunters". See if you can find them!
The supporting characters are written just as convincingly, and the reader really grows attached to them over the course of the novel. For a new alien race, Muuurgh the Togarian is nicely introduced and integrated. He never feels out of place, and becomes a sort of predecessor to Chewbacca without becoming a "clone" of him. While Muuurgh honors a life debt similiar to Chewbacca, he is unique because he has other motivations besides watching Han, which is to find his lost mate. The other new character is Bria, Han's love interest. Bria is also not a Leia "clone.
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