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The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson [Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged] [MP3 CD]

Robert A. Caro , Grover Gardner , Inc. Brilliance Audio
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Book Description

May 1 2012 The Years of Lyndon Johnson (Book 4)
The Passage of Power follows Lyndon Johnson through both the most frustrating and the most triumphant periods of his career — 1958 to 1964. It is a time that would see him trade the extraordinary power he had created for himself as Senate Majority Leader for what became the wretched powerlessness of a Vice President in an administration that disdained and distrusted him. Yet it was, as well, the time in which the presidency, the goal he had always pursued, would be thrust upon him in the moment it took an assassin’s bullet to reach its mark. For the first time, we see the Kennedy assassination through Lyndon Johnson’s eyes. We watch Johnson step into the presidency, inheriting a staff fiercely loyal to his slain predecessor; a Congress determined to retain its power over the executive branch; and a nation in shock and mourning. We see how within weeks — grasping the reins of the presidency with supreme mastery — he propels through Congress essential legislation that at the time of Kennedy’s death seemed hopelessly logjammed and seizes on a dormant Kennedy program to create the revolutionary War on Poverty. Caro makes clear how the political genius with which Johnson had ruled the Senate now enabled him to make the presidency wholly his own. This was without doubt Johnson’s finest hour, before his aspirations and accomplishments were overshadowed and eroded by the trap of Vietnam. It is an epic story told with a depth of detail possible only through the peerless research that forms the foundation of Robert Caro’s work, confirming Nicholas von Hoffman’s verdict that “Caro has changed the art of political biography.”


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“Brilliant . . . Important . . . Remarkable . . . In sparkling detail, Caro shows Johnson’s genius for getting to people—friends, foes, and everyone in between—and how he used it to achieve his goals . . .With this fascinating and meticulous account Robert Caro has once again done America a great service.” 
—President Bill Clinton, The New York Times Book Review (front cover)


“By writing the best presidential biography the country has ever seen, Caro has forever changed the way we think, and read, American history . . . Although the amount of research Caro has done for these books is staggering, it’s his immense talent as a writer that has made his biography of Johnson one of America’s most amazing literary achievements . . . Caro’s chronicle is as absorbing as a political thriller . . . There’s not a wasted word, not a needless anecdote . . . Most impressively, Caro comes closer than any other historian could to explaining the famously complex LBJ . . . Caro’s portrayal of the president is as scrupulously fair as it is passionate and deeply felt . . . The series is a masterpiece, unlike any other work of American history published in the past. It’s true that there will never be another Lyndon B. Johnson, but there will never be another Robert A. Caro, either.” —Michael Schaub, NPR 

“A breathtakingly dramatic story about a pivotal moment in United States history [told] with consummate artistry and ardor . . . It showcases Mr. Caro’s masterly gifts as a writer: his propulsive sense of narrative, his talent for enabling readers to see and feel history in the making and his ability to situate his subjects’ actions within the context of their times . . . Caro manages to lend even much-chronicled events a punch of tactile immediacy . . . Johnson emerges as both a larger-than-life, Shakespearean personage—with epic ambition and epic flaws—and a more human-scale puzzle . . .  Mr. Caro uses his storytelling gifts to turn seemingly arcane legislative maneuvers into action-movie suspense, and he gives us unparalleled understanding of how Johnson used a crisis and his own political acumen to implement his agenda with stunning speed. Taken together the installments of Mr. Caro’s monumental life of Johnson form a revealing prism by which to view the better part of a century in American life and politics.” 
—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times 
 
“A great work of history . . . A great biography . . . Caro has summoned Lyndon Johnson to vivid, intimate life.” —Newsweek 
 
“Making ordinary politics and policymaking riveting and revealing is what makes Caro a genius. Combined with his penetrating insight and fanatical research, Caro’s Churchill-like prose elevates the life of a fairly influential president to stuff worthy of Shakespeare . . . Reading Caro’s books can feel like encountering the life of an American president for the first time . . . Caro’s judgment is solid, his prose inspiring, and his research breathtaking . . . Robert Caro stands alone as the unquestioned master of the contemporary American political biography.” 
—Jordan Michael Smith, The Boston Globe
 
“A meditation on power as profound as Machiavelli’s.” —Lara Marlowe, Irish Times
 
“One of the most compelling political narratives of the past half-century . . . A vivid picture of how political power worked in the US during the middle of the 20th century at local, state and national level. . . This extraordinary work will remain essential reading for decades to come.” —Richard Lambert, Financial Times
 
“Unrivaled . . . Caro does not merely recount. He beckons. Single sentences turn into winding, brimming paragraphs, clauses upon clauses tugging at the reader, layering the scenery with character intrigue and the plot with historical import. The result is irresistible . . . Passage covers with all the artistry and intrigue of a great novel events that are seared in the nation’s memory. In an era defined by fragmented media markets, instantaneous communication, gadflies and chattering suits, Caro stands not merely apart, but alone.” 
—William Howell, San Francisco Chronicle 
 
“The greatest political biography ever written . . . The most sweeping historical tour de force since Gibbons’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire . . . Caro has imprinted himself into history. His work is now the benchmark of political biography.” —Paul Sheehan, Sydney Morning Herald
 
“Riveting . . . Masterful . . . An insightful account of what it means and what it takes to occupy the Oval Office.” —Steve Paul, The Kansas City Star
 
“Robert Caro is the essential chronicler of these times: And these times should never be forgotten.” —Joel Connelly, Seattle Post-Intelligencer
 
“Caro’s masterpiece of biography . . . His strength as a biographer is his ability to probe Johnson’s mind and motivations . . . Riveting . . . A roller-coaster tale.” 
The Economist
 
“The latest in what is almost without question the greatest political biography in modern times . . . Nobody goes deeper, works harder or produces more penetrating insights than [Caro].” —Patrick Beach, Austin American-Statesman
 
“The politicians’ political book of choice . . . An encyclopedia of dirty tricks that would make Machiavelli seem naïve.” —Michael Burleigh, London Literary Review
 
“Majestic . . . The reporting is copious, the writing elegant and energetic, the sentences frequently rushing forward themselves like mighty rivers. Four books, and nearly four decades, into this vast project, Caro’s commitment to excellence has not wavered or even slackened; the reader can feel the sheer force of his effort on every page.” —Ronald Brownstein, Democracy 
 
“By dramatizing the capacities and limitations of the most talented politician of the postwar era, Caro aims to make readers shrewder citizens . . . As a student of power, Caro is a Machiavelli for democrats, who instead of addressing the prince, addresses the people.” —Thomas Meaney, The Nation
 
“Astonishing and unprecedented . . . a work of real literature, among the best nonfiction works ever . . . His books . . . argue that things happen because certain people with power want them to happen . . . It is not inconceivable to think that, without the presence of LBJ and the influence on him of his character and his experiences, none [of the civil rights bills] would have won Congressional approval . . . More than operatic, Caro’s Johnson books deserve another adjective, one that matches his genius, his sensitivity and his ambition: Shakespearean.” 
—Patrick T. Reardon 
 
“The best biography I’ve ever read . . . Incredibly well-written, with the tension and drama of a compulsive thriller, and the style of an elegant novel. Caro’s books aren’t just about politics, or just about Lyndon Johnson. His books are about America, its culture, its history, and its society. Above all, Caro’s books are about power, how to achieve it and make it multiply; how to use power and how to lose it.” —Michael Crick, UK Channel 4 News 
 
“My book of the year, by a landslide majority, was The Passage of Power. The adjective ‘Shakespearean’ is overused and mostly undeserved but not in this case. LBJ emerges from this biography as a fully rounded tragic hero: cowardly and brave, petty and magnificent, vindictive and noble, a man of vaunting ambition and profound insecurities. Caro marries profound psychological insight with a brilliant eye for the drama of the times.” —Robert Harris, The Guardian (London)

“Caro is a genius at delineating character, and not just that of the deliciously complicated LBJ. He investigates, among other larger-than-life figures, the Kennedy brothers, the powerful and unbending Harry Byrd of Virginia, and the clownlike but devoted Bobby Baker . . . Caro’s use of strong image and repetition, almost hypnotic in combination, is breathtakingly effective. Caro is a great historian, but if the purpose of art is to stimulate thought and arouse emotion, he is also a great artist.” —Rosemary Michaud, Charleston Post and Courier
 
“A portrait of executive leadership so evocative as to be tactile.” 
—Robert Draper, Wall Street Journal
 
“The only superstar biographer in the world . . . Caro’s [books] transform biography into something new, a tour de force of structured political opinion writing . . . A single theme emerges: the insidious ways that clever politicians can gather and abuse power—sometimes for good, sometimes for evil—in a modern democratic society.”  —Levi Asher, Literary Kicks
 
“One of the greatest biographies in the history of American letters.” 
—Bob Hoover, Cleveland Plain Dealer
 
“As riveting as a thriller . . . The next book will crown an achievement in presidential biography unmatched among presidential histories.” 
—David Hendricks, Houston Chronicle
 --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Robert A. Caro has twice won the Pulitzer Prize, twice won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and has also won virtually every other major literary honor, including the National Book Award, the Gold Medal in Biography from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the Francis Parkman Prize, awarded by the Society of American Historians to the book that “exemplifies the union of the historian and the artist.” In 2010, President Obama presented him with the National Humanities Medal. Caro lives in New York City with his wife, Ina, an historian and writer.

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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book! Aug. 8 2012
By Maxisback TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
This latest in Robt. Caro's series on LBJ is a wonderful, must-read book. I couldn't put it down -- a first for me. Having lived in the US during the Kennedy White House years, it was like reliving JFK's assination all over again. This may be the best of Caro's books on LBJ, and I eagerly await his next one. You don't have to be an LBJ fan to enjoy this one!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome May 27 2012
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Reads like a political thriller. Great prose. It was well worth the 10 year wait. Hope the last part is not too far down the road!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Let me begin this way: I love Robert Caro. I believe that Caro is the best political biographer alive today, and that he's even better than David McCullough, who is a titan. And, I'm already counting the days until his fifth (and reportedly, final, though you never know with Caro) book about Lyndon Johnson's life finds its way to bookstores.

With that said, I found The Passage of Power disappointing in some ways. It wasn't wanting for research and context (as usual, Caro shone). Caro did a great job of undermining many of the prevailing myths about the Kennedys, particularly Bobby, and Caro's brutalization of toadish hack-ademic Arthur Schlesinger was both complete and admirable. Caro accurately captured the challenges and choices political staff face when their patron falls from power (I can speak knowingly of this because I have walked in those shoes myself), and also did a good job of conveying the blinding speed with which Johnson grabbed the reins or power and spurred the horse of executive office to a gallop. Where the book disappointed was in maintaining the drama of Johnson's efforts to get movement on civil rights and his budget passed. Now, this isn't necessarily Caro's fault: it's his role to recapitulate the doings and identify the lessons in wielding power, not to inject phony drama into the narrative for the sake of his readers. But you knew - you just knew - that once Lyndon started working over the Senate's octogenarians, that he would get his way, which is why reading the chapters devoted to these matters was a tough-ish slog. If anything, Caro created this problem himself in Master of the Senate; no reader could finish that book and not know that Johnson with or against the Senate, Johnson was unstoppable, no matter the circumstances or the odds.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Go Where the Power Takes You" Oct. 31 2012
By Ian Gordon Malcomson HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
Talk about a man with a self-centered vision and the determination to make it happen! Lyndon Baines Johnson is one of those political characters whose ambition for political power in post-war America knew no limits. Pulling himself up, as he claimed, by the bootstraps from the humblest of beginnings to become America's thirty-fifth president is a story worth reading, especially when the author is the sharp-minded, analytical biographer, Robert Caro. His research allows him to address the critical question of how Johnson, a relatively obscure Texas congressman from Hill country, back in the forties, was able to make it all the way to the White House, with such enormous odds stacked against him. In this volume, Caro looks at the evolving world of this consummate politician as he took on a run for the presidency, the Kennedys, his southern base, historical change, and his own mortality and sense of destiny and came out a winner. What distills from this in-depth examination is a man who became skilled at manipulating, bullying, holding grudges, and adapting to circumstances beyond his immediate control. When compared with his arch-nemeses, the Kennedy brothers, in their pursuit of power, LBJ looks no better or worse. All three of these men were good apprentices in the trade of Machiavellian politics that encouraged its adherents to always use disarming tactics and strategies that would gain them short- and long-term advantage. Johnson, like Kennedy, knew how to charm and eat crow as the need arose. In effect, they needed each other to cement their place in history. As vice-president, Johnson reluctantly chose to become JFK's doormat in order to keep alive the notion that he could very well succeed him and create his own cherished legacy. Like in the other two earlier volumes, this one is loaded with anecdotal evidence that goes behind the scenes at conventions, private meetings, and cabinet sessions to get at the truth.
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Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Infuriatingly drawn-out version of LBJ's political life. The facts (too many of them) are all-but-drowned in commas, ellipses, dashes and other impedimenta. LBJ was an important U.S. President, able to implement important programs advocated by his assassinated predecessor, the glamorous JFK, whose power to enact much of his agenda was blocked by a hostile congress.
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