CDN$ 38.36
  • List Price: CDN$ 47.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 9.59 (20%)
Usually ships within 2 to 4 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Politics of Responsibility Hardcover – Jun 9 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 38.36
CDN$ 13.37 CDN$ 4.56

2014 Books Gift Guide
Thug Kitchen, adapted from the wildly popular web site beloved by Gwyneth Paltrow ("This might be my favorite thing ever"), is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Hardcover: 184 pages
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press; 1 edition (June 9 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0252032977
  • ISBN-13: 978-0252032974
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,339,170 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"A very good job of demonstrating the unavoidability of the question of responsibility and its particular philosophical difficulties. It is often the case that philosophically sophisticated political theorists avoid the hot-button issues of current topics such as globalization, police brutality, and abortion; or, when contemporary issues are addressed, sophisticated analysis gives way to the standard slogans. One of the strengths of Lavin's work is that contemporary debates animate his philosophical discussion."--Jason Read, author of The Micro-Politics of Capital: Marx and the Prehistory of the Present


"[A] fascinating political discussion of a stalwart ethical concept. . . . Recommended."--Choice

Book Description

Politics cannot function without responsibility, but there have been serious disagreements about how responsibility is to be understood and huge controversies about how it is to be distributed, rewarded, legislated, and enforced. The liberal notions of personal responsibility that have dominated political thinking in the West for more than a century are rooted in the familiar territory of individual will and causal blame, but these theories have been assailed as no longer adequate to explain or address the political demands of a global social structure. Informed by Marx, Foucault, and Butler, Chad Lavin argues for a "postliberal" theory of responsibility, formulating responsibility as a process that is anchored in a persistent ability to respond, not reproach. Lavin works this formulation through discussions of contemporary political issues such as globalization, police brutality, and abortion. 

Rather than assigning individual blame, postliberal responsibility challenges the supposed autonomy of individual subjects by taking structural arguments into account. Lavin concludes that a liberal concept of responsibility gives rise to a moralistic and oppressive approach to social problems, while a postliberal approach highlights a shared responsibility for developing collective solutions to systemic problems. Postliberal responsibility not only suggests more generous and democratic responses to social ills, it also allows us to theorize a greater range of issues that demand political response.     


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
Powerful, engaging study Sept. 21 2008
By Iron Lion of Zion - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Forcefully argued and lucidly written, this work critiques the ideological structures and discourses that continue to flourish around the concept of "responsibility" and its alleged possessor, the autonomous individual of liberal, late-capitalistic society. Lavin's many examples and close studies are extremely provocative; ultimately, he's convincing in showing how what he calls a "postliberal" view of responsibility is better suited to understanding and extending the pluralistic range of democratic society. These days, when it seems as though one can't hear a political speech or read an op-ed without hearing about "personal responsibility," Lavin's thoughtful study and practical guidance are thoroughly refreshing; this slim work points the way forward for those still willing to take on the political and institutional conditions of democratic freedoms, without the tired prejudices associated with individualist ideology.


Feedback