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The Quest of the Folk: Antimodernism and Cultural Selection in Twentieth-Century Nova Scotia Paperback – Aug 29 1994


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 392 pages
  • Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press (Aug. 29 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0773512489
  • ISBN-13: 978-0773512481
  • Product Dimensions: 21.8 x 15.3 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #918,865 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"A compelling and innovative book .... McKay writes with a felicitous style, and his penetrating and hard-nosed critical stance promises to make this one of the more controversial works to emerge in Canadian history in recent years, particularly as it relates to the careers of the demigods of Nova Scotia's folk essence, Helen Creighton and Mary Black." Colin Howell, Department of History, St Mary's University. "A magnificent piece of analysis bristling with insights. The Quest of the Folk is some of the best cultural history that has been produced in this country." Keith Walden, Department of History, Trent University.

About the Author

Ian McKay is professor of history, Queen's University, and the author of For a Working-Class Culture in Canada: A Selection of Colin McKay's Writing on Sociology and Political Economy, 1897-1939.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Edinburgh Reader on Sept. 2 2001
Format: Hardcover
Essential reading for anyone studying anything about Nova Scotia. Work past your assumptions of 'Canada's Ocean Playground' and the people who live there. Clear, concise and often amusing writing elevates this book way beyond dry academic study.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a great book about the cultural prejudices and historical misconceptions that shaped the false, but widely accepted, popular notion that Nova Scotia is the Scotland of the new world. Folklorists of an early era fashioned an image of "the folk" in Nova Scotia that politicians then and now have contrived to foster and perpetuate. A fascinating account, well researched and written. It is frequently attacked by those with a stake in the popular view.
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Amazon.com: 1 review
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
No Great Tartan Sept. 2 2001
By Edinburgh Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Essential reading for anyone studying anything about Nova Scotia. Work past your assumptions of 'Canada's Ocean Playground' and the people who live there. Clear, concise and often amusing writing elevates this book way beyond dry academic study.


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