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The Red Pony Mass Market Paperback – Feb 1 1993

2.9 out of 5 stars 140 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (Feb. 1 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140177361
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140177367
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 0.8 x 19 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 45 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars 140 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #30,833 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product Description

Review

Steinbeck is to be judged by the highest standards New York Herald Tribune --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

John Steinbeck, born in Salinas, California, in 1902, grew up in a fertile agricultural valley, about twenty-five miles from the Pacific Coast. Both the valley and the coast would serve as settings for some of his best fiction. In 1919 he went to Stanford University, where he intermittently enrolled in literature and writing courses until he left in 1925 without taking a degree. During the next five years he supported himself as a laborer and journalist in New York City, all the time working on his first novel, Cup of Gold (1929).

After marriage and a move to Pacific Grove, he published two California books, The Pastures of Heaven (1932) and To a God Unknown (1933), and worked on short stories later collected in The Long Valley (1938). Popular success and financial security came only with Tortilla Flat (1935), stories about Monterey’s paisanos. A ceaseless experimenter throughout his career, Steinbeck changed courses regularly. Three powerful novels of the late 1930s focused on the California laboring class: In Dubious Battle (1936), Of Mice and Men (1937), and the book considered by many his finest, The Grapes of Wrath (1939). The Grapes of Wrath won both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize in 1939.

Early in the 1940s, Steinbeck became a filmmaker with The Forgotten Village (1941) and a serious student of marine biology with Sea of Cortez (1941). He devoted his services to the war, writing Bombs Away (1942) and the controversial play-novelette The Moon is Down (1942).Cannery Row (1945), The Wayward Bus (1948), another experimental drama, Burning Bright(1950), and The Log from the Sea of Cortez (1951) preceded publication of the monumental East of Eden (1952), an ambitious saga of the Salinas Valley and his own family’s history.

The last decades of his life were spent in New York City and Sag Harbor with his third wife, with whom he traveled widely. Later books include Sweet Thursday (1954), The Short Reign of Pippin IV: A Fabrication (1957), Once There Was a War (1958), The Winter of Our Discontent (1961),Travels with Charley in Search of America (1962), America and Americans (1966), and the posthumously published Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters (1969), Viva Zapata!(1975), The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights (1976), and Working Days: The Journals of The Grapes of Wrath (1989).

Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1962, and, in 1964, he was presented with the United States Medal of Freedom by President Lyndon B. Johnson. Steinbeck died in New York in 1968. Today, more than thirty years after his death, he remains one of America's greatest writers and cultural figures. 

John Seelye was a graduate research professor of American literature at the University of Florida. He is the author of The True Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain at the Movies, Prophetic Waters: The River in Early American Literature, Beautiful Machine: Rivers and the Early Republic, Memory's Nation: The Place of Plymouth Rock, and War Games: Richard Harding Davis and the New Imperialism. He also served as the consulting editor for Penguin Classics in American literature. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


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At daybreak Billy Buck emerged from the bunkhouse and stood for a moment on the porch looking up at the sky. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book for the literary depth. There was wonderful development of each character. There was also descriptions of the scene, its weather, flora, relationships; so much so, that I felt I was there.

Each of these four chapters was actually a separate short story. The relationship between each chapter was one of character and scene. There was no plot relationship between these chapters. The Red Pony could have been developed into a marvelously captivating book; however, it is simply four short, unrelated stories, each one unfinished. This is a literary example of – “What could have been?” The presentation of these stories as a single book is not a blemish on Steinbeck’s writing legacy, but it is an example of poor marketing judgment.
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Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed this book for the literary depth. There was wonderful development of each character. There was also descriptions of the scene, its weather, flora, relationships; so much so, that I felt I was there.

Each of these four chapters was actually a separate short story. The relationship between each chapter was one of character and scene. There was no plot relationship between these chapters. The Red Pony could have been developed into a marvelously captivating book; however, it is simply four short, unrelated stories, each one unfinished. This is a literary example of – “What could have been?” The presentation of these stories as a single book is not a blemish on Steinbeck’s writing legacy, but it is an example of poor marketing judgment.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I enjoyed this book for the literary depth. There was wonderful development of each character. There was also descriptions of the scene, its weather, flora, relationships; so much so, that I felt I was there.

Each of these four chapters was actually a separate short story. The relationship between each chapter was one of character and scene. There was no plot relationship between these chapters. The Red Pony could have been developed into a marvelously captivating book; however, it is simply four short, unrelated stories, each one unfinished. This is a literary example of – “What could have been?” The presentation of these stories as a single book is not a blemish on Steinbeck’s writing legacy, but it is an example of poor marketing judgment.
1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book for the literary depth. There was wonderful development of each character. There was also descriptions of the scene, its weather, flora, relationships; so much so, that I felt I was there.

Each of these four chapters was actually a separate short story. The relationship between each chapter was one of character and scene. There was no plot relationship between these chapters. The Red Pony could have been developed into a marvelously captivating book; however, it is simply four short, unrelated stories, each one unfinished. This is a literary example of – “What could have been?” The presentation of these stories as a single book is not a blemish on Steinbeck’s writing legacy, but it is an example of poor marketing judgment.
1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I enjoyed this book for the literary depth. There was wonderful development of each character. There was also descriptions of the scene, its weather, flora, relationships; so much so, that I felt I was there.

Each of these four chapters was actually a separate short story. The relationship between each chapter was one of character and scene. There was no plot relationship between these chapters. The Red Pony could have been developed into a marvelously captivating book; however, it is simply four short, unrelated stories, each one unfinished. This is a literary example of – “What could have been?” The presentation of these stories as a single book is not a blemish on Steinbeck’s writing legacy, but it is an example of poor marketing judgment.
1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
the Red Pony review

A quality piece. Truly literary art at its best. Recommended for all readers willing to tackle it.

Though I wouldn't force it upon pre-highschool or highschool readers; as is apparently vogue these days. They're not going to get it.

John Steinbeck's novella, originally copyrighted 1933. This piece now known as The Red Pony has four(4) titled parts: 1) The Gift 2) The Great Mountains 3) The Promise 4) The Leader of the People.

In "The Gift", the book's only 4 characters are introduced. Son, Jody, gets a red pony; and it dies.

In "The Great Mountains", life is sandwiched between opposite mountain ranges and Jody wonders about what's past them. The old worthless gypsy steals off into them with Carl's resource, an old worthless nag awaiting a bullet and its turn to be cashed in at the butcher's glue factory.

In "The Promise", Jody gets his dead red pony replaced with a fine black colt, but at what price? Once again, surrogate father, BillyBuck, flounders in Jody's eyes.

In "The Leader of the People", me becomes We. The process "westering" is hope. Jody forgoes killing fat mice with Mutt&Smasher, the ranchyard dogs, in deference to selfless service unto his ailing Grandfather. Jody to his mom, "Can I have a lemon to make a lemonade for Grandfather? ... No ma'am. I don't want one [a lemonade also; just one; for Grandfather only; to help him feel better.]"

The book only has 4 characters throughout. Jody Tiflin (son), Carl Tiflin(father), Mrs.Tiflin(mother), BillyBuck (ranchhand). Cameo characters are the aging Gitano; a neighbor rancher Jess Taylor, and a maternal side tiflin Grandfather.

Upon beginning this read, you might be fooled thinking its a bit weak on plot.
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