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The Samurai's Daughter Hardcover – Feb 20 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Canada / Fiction (Feb. 20 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0066212901
  • ISBN-13: 978-0066212906
  • Product Dimensions: 23.7 x 16.1 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 581 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,851,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
Unlike other reviewers, I enjoyed Rei's experience of returning to America after living so long in Japan. We see Japan through her Americanized eyes and then we see San Francisco filtered through her Japanese experience.
I agree with other reviewers: This series is best read from beginning to end. But if you've been following Rei Shimura and have come to care about the heroine, this volume offers background into the heroine's life and how she has been formed into a unique individual -- someone who grew up in the US but lives comfortably in Japan.
The plot was a little far-fetched and there is some reliance on coincidence. Most readers will smell a rat as soon as they meet the character who turns out to be the villain, although the connection won't seem at all obvious. However, I didn't mind and didn't question the plot or the motive until I put the book down, after a long and satisfying read.
And Rei's alliance with Hugh should lead to more adventures. As others have noted, the author is at
her best when she's writing about Japan. However, beginning with The Bride's Kimono, I suspect the author wants to write more about the US. And I'll look forward to the next volume in the series, no matter where it takes place.
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Format: Hardcover
I started reading this book only because my husband had it. I am a Japanese woman living in the US, and I found the author, Sujata Massey adequately depicting modern Japanese culture and psyche in this book. I thought the book was very entertaining as well, but the motive of the killing in this case was too bizarre for my taste. This is the least favorite of my husband among her other books. I have read latest two books of the series and I wish I had read in order. Still, it is easy to follow the big picture of what is going on with the main character, Rei's life.
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By A Customer on Dec 10 2003
Format: Hardcover
I just finished this latest addition to Sujata Massey's Rei Shimura mystery series. I thought it rivaled her other novels, and even bettered a few of them.
A change of setting was a new twist Massey gave the reader in this book, splitting Rei's time between her hometown of San Francisco, and her beloved, adopted home in Tokyo. I thought this split helped character development - the reader got to know Rei and her background even more than in previous novels. Her love life has finally stablized with on-again, off-again beau, Scottish man Hugh Glendinning.
While Rei is visiting her parents in SF, she is working on a family history document. Hugh is a central character as he navigates his way through a class action lawsuit against former WWII slave laborers. As her involment in both projects grow, Rei comes to understand her own roots even more fully.
If you've never read one of Massey's books before, this will be a treat (and go grab the others, too!). If you are looking for guns, violence, and hard language, look elsewhere. Massey's lack of these things makes her novels a haven for me! If you have enjoyed her novels before, this one, I believe, will not be a disappointment.
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Format: Hardcover
This latest in the delightful Rei Shimura series finds our intrepid Japanese-American once again up to her delicate neck in mystery and mayhem--with a bit of intrigue and a lot of love interest thrown in.
Stuck with her parents in their San Francisco homestead, Rei is in turn pleased to be spoiled, and chafing under the bit to get back to her privacy in Japan. But she has a strange house guest, a native Japanese student, to contend with--as well as the ardent courtship of her long-time boyfriend, the sexy Scots lawyer Hugh Glendinning.
While contending with the usual East-West contradictions of her everyday life, Rei is contenting herself with researching and writing her family's history. But she uncovers more than she bargained for when it turns out that her grandfather actually tutored Emperor Hirohito--and may have been part of a right-wing Japanese political group that fostered the ultimate events of World War II. Now Rei has to face the Japan of the War, and contrast it with the modern-day Japan, her much-beloved adopted country--and the country of her father.
Add to that the top-secret case that Hugh is working on, which concerns reparations for Japanese war crimes, and one gets an idea of Rei's state of mind. For the first time, she becomes distant from her father and her family as she searches her soul for who she really is.
The answer is there, and always has been, for the enchanted reader to see--and when Rei ultimately finds herself, there is a wonderful treat in store for her and for us.
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Format: Hardcover
I feel the same way about this series that many reviewers seem to: a lot of what makes these books interesting is their glimpses into modern-day life in Japan. So, there is a significant loss when instead a novel (this one) takes place primarily in San Francisco. However, the mystery was still intriguing and I did learn interesting tidbits about Japanese culture through this book. I just hope the setting returns to Japan & stays there!
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