Quantity:1

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

The Sea Hawk; Symphony in F-Sh


Price: CDN$ 22.12 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
15 new from CDN$ 13.80 5 used from CDN$ 15.36

Artists to Watch
Artists to Watch
Be the first to hear about the hottest emerging artists. Featuring ten new artists each month, Artists to Watch will help you stay in the know when it comes to up-and-coming artists. See all of this month's picks

Product Details

  • Performer: Korngold
  • Composer: Korngold
  • Audio CD (Aug. 1 2008)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Del
  • ASIN: B000007O71
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

1. The Sea Hawk
2. I. Moderato Ma Energico
3. II. Scherzo: Allegro Molto
4. III. Adagio: Lento
5. IV. Finale: Allegro

Product Description

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
As an Erich Wolfgang Korngold (EWK) film-score enthusiast, I bought the CD to listen only to the Sea Hawk "suite"; that the Symphony in F-Sharp came along with it didn't much matter. Boy, did I get a surprise! On a scale of five, the CD rates an average 3-1/2 stars (five for being recorded by a "regional" orchestra---more on this later; 3-1/2 for performance; and two for sound quality). The snippets from EWK's score for The Sea Hawk (1940) are laconic, suffer from inferior recording/ mixing, and have been recorded many times before. Aside from the hard-to-find "classic" versions on BMG conducted by Mr. Charles Gerhardt in the 70's--if you can find ANYTHING with Mr. Gerhardt conducting, buy it immediately!--the best modern recording is on Varese Sarabande with Mr. Varujan Kajian conducting the Utah Symphony (another "regional"). If you're just discovering EWK's film music, you'll definitely want to own all of these. The third movement of the Symphony is its best--particularity fortunate for film fans, since it offers what the last part of EWK's score for Elizabeth and Essex (1939) might have sounded like had Korngold scored it himself (a highly-recommended, modern recording of the film score is on Varese Sarabande with Mr. Carl Davis conducting the Munich Symphony). This movement is exceptionally beautiful, but uniquely presented in a touchingly-haunting, and dream-like manner that is in dramatic contrast to the sound-track music (which addresses how the Queen finally manages to isolate the head of the Essex problem). Would I buy this CD again if a Rottweiler ate it? You bet! In fact, I'd buy two copies, since The Oregon Symphony--like a number of other not-as-well-known, regional orchestras (both in the US and Europe)--has had the creative enlightenment, originality, and flat-out courage to help bring back EWK's music.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Pure kornGOLD... May 22 2006
By vmzfla - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
At the end of WWII Wolfgang Korngold retired from films and focused the remainder of his life(D.1957)on composing concert music. At that time of completion his massive late-romantic Symphony in F-Sharp was almost completely ignored, in favor of more fashionable chamber works(sparser orchestration)by others. Though ridiculed for his continual tonal writing the F Symphony became one of the gems of the post war era.

The opening dissonant chords however appear atonal until the clarinet introduces a haunting first subject theme, which in my opinion could have used further development. It seemingly being hatched in the middle of chaos and tense development. On a whole the first movement takes on a sinister forboding ambiance. One will feel alot more secure with the goose bump heroic theme brought forth by the horns following a lively tarantella. This scherzo is orchestrated to great effect and is one of my favorite all-time symphonic movements. In the adagio, taking cues from his mentor, Mahler; Korngold provides a overpowering solemn, somber furneral march. This derived from the death march of his 1939 score "The Private Lives of Elisabeth and Essex". There are three different climaxes that form the tragic mood. The finale is a joyous rondo using a dance like main theme borrowed from his score to "Kings Row" and recapitulated material from the earlier movements. This all making for an emotional musical rollercoaster ride of a symphony. For certain Korngold never foregoes his film music roots. You can say the whole package is movie music without a movie. Create your own fantasy, immerse youself in his symphonic bath. Included is a short suite from the best swashbuckler ever,"The Sea Hawk" which I think should have followed the symphony as an encore, rather than precede it.

Delos gives us good expansive sound characteristic for this kind of music. DePriest and his Oregon Symphony seem comptetent enough. A note: Korngold's daughter Kathrin joins the strings for this 1997 recording. Excellent liner notes by Brendon Carroll author of Korngold's bio the "Last Prodigy" adds to the authenticity.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
All Korngold lovers.... Oct. 12 2013
By Gooey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
All Korngold lovers should give a listen to this disc. Everything you could want--the basic energy and soaring thrills beautifully achieved by a first-class sounding orchestra--is just the baseline of these spectacular performances. Atop all that, Depreist layers a sensuousness Korngold lovers have always known was there but seldom heard it so fully realized as it is here. Of course it doesn't displace your favorite, whichever that may be; it just adds pleasures you might have missed to the pile. After all, who'd ever own just one Korngold disc?
15 of 23 people found the following review helpful
Prefer Korngold more layed back? Then this CD is for you! May 16 1999
By William F. Flanigan Jr. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
As an Erich Wolfgang Korngold (EWK) film-score enthusiast, I bought the CD to listen only to the Sea Hawk "suite"; that the Symphony in F-Sharp came along with it didn't much matter. Boy, did I get a surprise! On a scale of five, the CD rates an average 3-1/2 stars (five for being recorded by a "regional" orchestra---more on this later; 3-1/2 for performance; and two for sound quality). The snippets from EWK's score for The Sea Hawk (1940) are laconic, suffer from inferior recording/ mixing, and have been recorded many times before. Aside from the hard-to-find "classic" versions on BMG conducted by Mr. Charles Gerhardt in the 70's--if you can find ANYTHING with Mr. Gerhardt conducting, buy it immediately!--the best modern recording is on Varese Sarabande with Mr. Varujan Kajian conducting the Utah Symphony (another "regional"). If you're just discovering EWK's film music, you'll definitely want to own all of these. The third movement of the Symphony is its best--particularity fortunate for film fans, since it offers what the last part of EWK's score for Elizabeth and Essex (1939) might have sounded like had Korngold scored it himself (a highly-recommended, modern recording of the film score is on Varese Sarabande with Mr. Carl Davis conducting the Munich Symphony). This movement is exceptionally beautiful, but uniquely presented in a touchingly-haunting, and dream-like manner that is in dramatic contrast to the sound-track music (which addresses how the Queen finally manages to isolate the head of the Essex problem). Would I buy this CD again if a Rottweiler ate it? You bet! In fact, I'd buy two copies, since The Oregon Symphony--like a number of other not-as-well-known, regional orchestras (both in the US and Europe)--has had the creative enlightenment, originality, and flat-out courage to help bring back EWK's music.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A warm, very convincing account of the Korngold Symphony Aug. 15 2012
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The Korngold Symphony in F sharp (the composer didn't specify major or minor key in the title) has amassed two high-profile recordings over the years, under Franz Welser-Most (EMI) and Andre Previn (DG) - a nice outcome for a work that received three feeble European performances in the early Fifties and none at all in the U.S. until 1984. Korngold was the most pedigreed of Hollywood composers, an emigre form Hitler's austria who was considered a child prodigy to rival or even surpass, Mozart. Hollywood gave him a second life, but it ended his career as a serious composer. He returned to non-film composing after a severe heart attack in 1947, and although there was a premiere under Furtwangler, of all people, the remaining years before he died in 1957 were obscure.

Like most postwar listeners, I discovered Korngold through the one-man revival of his classic MGM scores under Charles Gerhardt, a record producer for RCA who had considerable podium skills. Excerpts from The Sea Hawk figured on Gerhardt's first thrilling lP of Korngold's music, and i must say that James DePreist's version is pallid and almost dawdling by comparison. But this augury isn't reliable. The main work, the Symphony in F sharp, is done very well, with real feeling and alertness to the score's lush beauty and haunting shadows.

In his polemical program notes, Brendan Carroll (Korngold's biographer and family friend) tries to argue that the symphony rose triumphantly from the "desert" of orchestral music after WW II, defying the dominance of Schoenberg and serialism. Exaggeration aside, the work is very appealing, especially here, because dePreist is not as dry as Welser-Most and more easy-going and modest than Previn. Ingenious as the music is, its idiom remains decidedly Hollywood, but with ambitions. That criticism damned Korngold's attempts at a late serious career as far as the "More gold, less corn" crowd was concerned. But late Romanticism now transcends the calendar, and the late dates of the Korngold Violin Cto. and Symphony hardly matter; they are both lovely and belong beautifully in our imaginary Vienna in the golden era between Johann and Richard Strauss.

Delos adds to the sweep of the music with CinemaScope sound, and the Oregon Sym., founded in 1896, plays very well for DePreist, who is credited with reviving the orchestra during his long tenure, from 1980 to 2003, as music director, stands as one of the rare African-American conductors of note. In Portland and also in Sweden he has carved a career and released a number of excellent recordings. This is a notable one, even if the big splash made by Previn and Welser-Most is replaced with music-making that is more natural and subdued.

P.s. 2013 - I now think that the Albrecht recording of the symphony on PentaTone surpasses this one for energy, orchestral execution, and recorded sound.


Feedback