The Sky Is Falling: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 20.65
  • List Price: CDN$ 32.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 12.30 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Sky Is Falling: A Novel Hardcover – Aug 7 2010


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 20.65
CDN$ 6.59 CDN$ 6.21

Join Amazon Student in Canada


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Allen Publishers; Canadian First edition (Aug. 7 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0887626130
  • ISBN-13: 978-0887626135
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.7 x 3.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 567 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #311,444 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Earl L Fogel on Jan. 21 2012
Format: Hardcover
The Sky Is Falling is the story of a shy young student sharing a house with some rather odd fellow students in 1980s Vancouver. "Jane" is bright but insecure, agonizing over everything -- school work, her friends, her family, and pretty much everything else. Her friends and roommates are a hodge podge of peace activists, anarchists, feminists, and revolutionaries -- out to change the world but without a clue as to how to do it.

It's also the story of Jane twenty years later, still insecure, but now happily married, when one day she picks up the newspaper and sees one of her roommates, just released after 20 years in prison.

It's an engaging story, sometimes serious but more often laugh-out-loud funny, as Adderson manages to surprise the reader with hilarious events which are completely unexpected and yet make perfect sense, but only after you read them.

It's a great book and I'm sure you'll like it too.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The McSkis on Jan. 4 2011
Format: Hardcover
By the seventh page of this novel, I was completely hooked. I read this entire book in a single day, unable to stop myself. Adderson takes a million details and cohesively organizes them into a narrative that touches on many themes; youthful idealism and rebellion, awkward sexual discovery, and the differences between Jane's teenage persona and her current role as the mother of an adolescent.

Not only did I find the characters and the sense of place well-developed and emotionally compelling, but way that Jane's earlier perspective is almost completely couched in Chekhovian references makes for an interesting and unique narrative voice. An equal blend of humor and pathos, the heavy subject of nuclear weapons and the Cold War in the 1980's are set against the ironic faux-Russian identity thrust upon Jane by her comparatively Quixotic housemates. The novel also explores the idea that the fear of dying is worse than actually dying, and most characters, as is true with life, develop into unexpected but strangely appropriate incarnations of their former selves, underlying their degree of hypocrisy (or lack thereof).

Adderson takes her cues from the rich canon of 20th Century female CanLit writers (Atwood, Laurence, Munro) in that her goal beyond storytelling appears to be the preservation of Canadian history and culture through a female perspective. A highly recommended read for anyone looking for a poignant and well-written book that balances the dialogue between heart and mind.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AJM on Nov. 10 2010
Format: Hardcover
I've read Sitting Practice and A History of Forgetting, so I expected to like this book and I wasn't disappointed. Actually, I liked this one the best of all three. I loved the characters - they are so flawed but so sympathetic. I was never involved in the nuclear protest movement myself, but after reading this book I feel like I understand what would make it compelling, especially for a young person. And, as always with Adderson, the language is brilliant.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.


Feedback